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Full text of "Pacific Oil Reporter (1902-1903)"

CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 



Call No. 



2007 120M550 5 

California Slate Library 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. I. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., NOVEMBER 7, 1902. 



Price 10 Cents. 




\ 

) 




Goods 

Manufactured 
By the 



OIL WELL 
SUPPLY CO. 



U&ee&e 



Of 

Pittsburgh, 

Penna. 



g^feS* 



FOR 



Drilling & Operating Oil & Gas Wells 

Are known and used throughout the world, because they are 
The Best That Can Be Made. 



Business Established 1S6I 

Have Ten Fully Equipped Manufacturing Plants 



Special Attention is Invited to the Superiority of their 

Boilers, Engines, Drilling Tools, Etc. 



SOLE AGENTS 

READING IRON CO.'S 
IRON CASING, 
TUBING, DRIVE and 
LINE PIPE 






Stocks oj these Goods are carried 
by Dealers at 

Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, 
Bakersfield, 
McKittrick, 
Coalinga, Etc. 



?e 






- 






THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




BOSTON CASING 



<£> LINE PIPE 



<b> DRIVE PIPE 




b> TUBING 

As Manufactured by the 

NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through 5 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vot. 4. No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., FRIDAY, NOVI-.MBER 7, 190a. 



Pricb, Ten i'bnts. 



GENERAL W. H. H. HART. 



He Is Reported to Have Succeeded in Land- 
ing His Oil Enterprise. 



Several Companies Organized and Money Raised for 

the Purpose of Constructing Pipe-Lines, Tanks, 

Steamers and to Build Up Foreign Trade. 



General VV. H. H. Hart has not 
returned yet from New York, 
where an intended business trip 
of a few weeks has lengthened 
into a stay of nearly four months. 

General Hart's mission was two- 
fold, the first being to perfect 
plans for the establishment of an 
immense iron-ore reduction plant, 
the ore to be obtained from an im- 
mense mountanous deposit in 
Madera county, to which a railroad 
was to be constructed. 

The second enterprise was the 
consolidation of a number of pro- 
ducing oil companies, the product 
of which was to be largely used 
for smelting the ore, which pro- 
cess would require a very large 
supply of oil daily. In addition 
to this, much oil would be refined 
by a new process, and much of it 
would be shipped abroad, or used 
on the Pacific coast for fuel pur- 
poses. 

That General Hart has not en- 
tirely succeeded in accomplishiug 
his mission is evidenced by his 
continued stay in the East. If his 
mission was accomplished he 
would return to San Francisco im- 
mediately, as his presence here on 
other matters is greatly desired. 

That he has succeeded in a great 
measure is indicated by the state- 
ments of those interested with him 
in the success of his various 
gigantic schemes, and by his own 
words. 

In a recent interview he is 
quoted as follows: 

"The Oil Securities company has 
just been chartered under the laws of 
Arizona with a capitalization of $20,000,- 
000, divided into $1 shares, fully paid 
and non- assessable. AU the capital 
stock is placed in the treasury, and is 
divided as follows: $10,000,000 common, 
$5,000,000 first preferred, $5,000,000 
second preferred. The company if or- 
ganized along the lines of the Northern 
Securities company and is to be a hold- 
ing company for oil companies in any 
part of the United States. The stock 
would have been issued in $100 shares 
but, as most of the companies to be ab- 
sorbed have shares with a par value of 
$1, it was deemed simplest to make this 
stock of the same par value. The $5,- 
000,000 of first preferred is sold at par. 
Interest on it is guaranteed at 6 per cent 
from January I, 1903, and all of it is 
underwritten. The second preferred 
bears 6 per cent cumulative interest, is 
to be issued in exchange for the stock of 
the companies absorbed, and no proper- 
ties will be taken in unless they are 
producing or have developed suffi- 
cient oil to pay 6 per cent on all stock 
issued for the same. The $10,000,000 
of common stock is held in reserve for 
the purchase of other territory and fu- 
ture development. 

big PIPE-tiNE PROJBCT. 

" In connection with the Oil Securi- 
ties company another company to build 
a pipe-line has been organized with 
a capital of $5,000,000. The pipe-line 



is to extend along the cast and west 
sides of the San Joaquin valley anil run 
to deep water. This company will issue 
$5,000,000 6 per cent 20 year bonds to 
build the lines. An agreement has been 
made by a syndicate of capitalists to 
take the bonds at a price that is private. 
The Oil Securities company is to sign a 
contract to ship all its oil production 
through these pipe-lines for the next 
twenty years, and soon as that contract 
is signed the entire capital stock of the 



coast of 1,200,000 barrels for foreign 
shipment annually for twenty-one 
This represents about half of our pro- 
duction. We have a shipping rate of 
$-> 4<> per ton for refined and $2 per ton 
foi crude to China and all ports in the 
Pacific nigher to San Francisco. 

PROPICRTU-S TO UK TAKICN IN. 

" The properties so far arranged for 
that will be taken into the Oil Secuiities 
company consist of 1,200 acres in the 
Kern River district of California, 16,000 
acreson the west aide. Including bold- 
ings in the Sunset, Midway and McKit- 
trick fields, 640 acres in the Coalinga 
district, and 12,000 acres in Alaska. The 
production developed at presenton these 
properties is 200,000 barrels per month. 

" The stock and bonds of the various 
corporations are being taken by New 
York, California and English capitalists. 
I kuow several of the people who are 
hacking the proposition, and to the best 
of my knowledge Mr. Morgan is not in- 
terested. The main offices of the com- 
pany will be in New York and San Fran- 
cisco. There is sufficient market for the 
half of our product, which is not already 
practically contracted for in the foreign 
trade, on the Pacific coast. Taking into 
account the industries there that will use 
petroleum instead of coal if they can get 
a uniform crude, the present production 



California's Oil and Asphalt Production. 

The following table shows the amount and value of California's 
oil and asphalt production from the years 1887 to 1901 inclusive, as 
compiled from the bulletin recently issued by State Mineralogist 1 
Lewis E. Aubray. The figures are those of Charles G. Yale, the 
statistician of the United States Mint. 





Oil,. 


Asphalt. 


Ybar. 






Value 






Value 




Barrels. 


Value. 


per 
barrel. 


Tons. 


Value. 


per 
ton. 


1887.... 


678,572 


$1,357,144 


$2.00 


4,000 


$16,000 


t$4-00 


1888 


690.333 


1,380,666 


2.00 


3,100 


39.500 


12.74 


1889.. .. 


303,220 


368,048 


1. 21 


3,000 


30,000 


10.00 


1890. . . . 


307,360 


384,200 


1-25 


3,000 


30,000 


10.00 


1891 


323,600 


401,264 


I.24 


4,000 


40,000 


10.00 


1892 


385.049 


56t,333 


1-45 


7,550 


75.500 


10.00 


1893.... 


470,179 


608,092 


1.29 


9.150 


161,250 


17.62 


1894.... 


783.078 


1,064,521 


i-35 


11,698 


233.800 


19.98 


1895.... 


1.245,339 


1,000,235 


.88 


25.525 


170,500 


6.67 


1896 


1,257,780 


1. 180,793 


■93 


20,914 


362,590 


17.24 


i8 9 7--" 


1,911,569 


1,918,269 


1. 00 


22,697 


404.350 


13.40 


1898 


2,249,088 


2,376,420 


105 


25.690 


482,175 


18.77 


1899.... 


2.677.875 


2,660,793 


■99 


15,060 


308,130 


20.45 


1900. . . . 


4,329,950 


4,152,928 


.98 


12,575 


253.950 


20.19 


1901 


7.910,315 


$2,961,102 


$ -37 


21,634 


$113,219 


$14.47 


Totals . 


25-323.3°7 


$22,375,808 


J$.88 


I89.593 


$2,920,964 


$15-41 


1902* .. . 


12,500,000 


$2,500,000 


$0.20 


26,000 


$338,000 


$13.00 


* Estim 


ated. t Aver. 


ige price. 











Pipe-Line company is to be turned over 
to the Oil Securities company. The 
fixed rate to be charged for each barrel 
of oil handled by the pipe-line, based 
on present production, is sufficient to 
pay the interest on the bonds and pro- 
vide a sinking fund for the redemption 
of the bonds at the end of the twenty 
years as well as paying operating ex- 
penses. The excess of profits over that 
goes to the Oil Securities company, 
which will have the pipe lines free of 
debt at the end of twenty years. 

"The third company organized by the 
Oil Securities company is the Refining 
company, capitalized at $5,000,000, and 
divided into $100 shares. Of the stock 49 
percent is to go to the Oil Securites com- 
pany, 2 per cent to be held in voting 
trust certificates, and 49 percent to pat- 
entees and to provide money to complete 
the plants. We have the best system of 
refining oils ever discovered. Under it 
we can refine oil at 25 percent of what 
the Standard Oil company has to pay. 

"Our object is not to fight the Stand- 
ard, but simply to take out the light oils 
so as to better crude petroleum for fuel 
purposes with the object of submitting 
crude oil residuum for coal in all parts of 
the world where it can successfully com- 
pete with coal. We will establish a uni- 
form grade of crude that can be handled 
with absolute safety. For this fuel we 
have an assured market on the Pacific 



is not sufficient to supply 40 percent of 
the demand." 

From unofficial but reliable sources we 
have learned that John W. Gates, the 
Chicago and New York multi-million- 
aire, and Mr. Eddy, of Flint, Eddy & 
Co., the great ship-owners, are leaders in 
the combine. 



WESTER N UNIO N OIL CO. 

A Report Current that Its Prop- 
erty Has Been Sold. 

A report has gained currency 
in Santa Barbara to the effect that 
the interests of the Western Union 
Oil company in the oil territory 
in the north of Santa Barbara 
county may change hands within 
a short time. It is stated upon 
what seems to be pretty good 
authority that an option was 
signed less than a week ago for 
the property indicated, and that 
the figure named in the option is 
close to $1,750,000. The story is 
that the matter of the signing of 
this option came to the public 
through statements from both 
sides of the deal, from one of the 



holders of the Western Union and 
from one of the intending pur- 
chasers. In case the matter is 
correctly reported and a sale takes 
place, the transaction will be the 
largest ever known in that county 
and one of the biggest deals in 
the history of southern California. 

The wells are located upon the 
Carreaga ranch in the I,os Alamos 
valley. There are about ten wells 
under pumps, each producing 
something like 225 barrels of oil 
per day. The territory is proved 
in the most thorough way, and it 
is probable that no well will be 
sunk within a long distance of 
the present wells that will not 
prove remunerative. The market 
lor the oil produced is excellent 
and the present company has 
provided itself with pipe-lines and 
storage tanks. The cost of de- 
veloping the field has been borne 
by comparatively few men, who 
have invested something like 
$200,000. The wells range in 
depth from 1,500 to 1,900 feet. 

That there is a deep interest in 
the northern part of Santa Bar- 
bara county is to be seen in the 
number of people visiting it with 
the purpose of obtaining leases 
upon whit they believe to be rich 
territory contiguous to the West- 
ern Union field. Mr. Treadwell, 
the well-known operator of the 
Kern field, has just paid a visit to 
the territory around the Western 
Union property, and it is thought 
that he made his visit to expert 
the field for E. H. Harriman. 
Frank Garbutt, identified with the 
Union Oil company of California, 
has leased several pieces in the 
north of the county and has pur- 
chased the Hobbs tanks. It is 
stated that $90 per acre was the 
price of this land. One of the im- 
portant pieces credited to Mr. 
Garbutt as leased to him is the 
Hartnell rancho here. 



TO ADV ANCE PRICES. 

Buyer Raises Price from Ten to 
Fifteen Cents. 

One of the largest independent 
producers in the Kern River field 
has lately been offered 15 cents 
per barrel for all the oil it can 
produce over and above the 
amount demanded by its existing 
contracts. The noticeable feature 
of this offer is this, that last July 
the same company was offered 10 
cents by the same firm. 

The advance is not great when 
looked at in the light of the early 
opinions, but it is, nevertheless, a 
substantial and gratifying in- 
crease. It discloses two facts: 
One, that there is a decided tend- 
ency toward better prices; the 
other, that the forces which have 
kept oil down are either losing 
their hold upon the market or 
have secured the results sought in 
the movement to depress rates. 

On all sides it is stated that the 
"feeling is better." Confidence 
seems about to be restored and 
the wild scramble to get rid of the 
product for fear that no sale 
ever could be made, is at an end. 
Producers are both better esta- 
blished and are recovering from 
the folly of letting go at ruinous 
rates. The wisdom of refraining 
from giving good oil away has 
again gained the ascendency. — 
Bakersfield Californian. 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



IN HARD LINES. 



MisreppeseDtation Used to Bol- 
ster Up the Combine. 

The Associated Oil company is 
in hard lines. 

The continued kicking of dis- 
satisfied stockholders is becoming 
exceedingly bothersome. Instead 
of lessening, the dissatisfaction is 
increasing. 

Apparently the Combine is 
making use of all kinds prom- 
ises and misrepresentations in 
order to bolster itself up in the 
estimation of stockholders and 
allay the prevalent spirit of unrest. 

On Monday morning the Ex- 
aminer had the following, presum- 
ably furnished from the office of 
the Combine: 

The Union Trust company has agreed 
to float a loan of $5, 000,000 on behalf of 
the Associated Oil companies. The 
bonds are to run for twenty years at 
5 per cent per annum. This fuel oil 
syndicate was organized within the past 
two years and is said to control So per 
cent of the wells in the Kern River dis- 
trict and 90 per cent of the oil proper- 
ties in the McKittrick section. Joseph 
Chanslor of Los Angeles is president 
and W. S. Porter of this city manager of 
the property. A. J. Hechtrhan, Frank 
H. Buck and other prominent capitalists 
are interested in the syndicate. 

Neither the Hellmans, who are to float 
the loan, nor Manager W. S. Porter of 
the company will discuss the matter. 
Other people in the oil syndicate, how- 
ever, state that most of the borrowed 
money will be used in building tank 
steamers and in erecting storage reser- 
voirs in Honolulu, Seattle, Taconia, 
Portland and other places to which oil 
shipments are to be made. The syndi- 
cate at one time contemplated the con- 
struction of a pipe-line either north to 
a point on the bay of San Francisco or 
west to Port Harford on San Luis Obispo 
bay. Any scheme of this character has 
practically been abandoned and use will 
be ma e of the Standard Oil company's 
pipe-line, which will soon be completed 
from Kern county to Point Richmond. 

The Standard oil people operate on 
this coast under the name of the Pacific 
Coast Oil company and it is the latter 
which owns the pipe-hue mentioned. 
There is plenty of ground for believing 
the Associated Oil companies and the 
Standard people are to work hand in 
glove in exploiting the shipment of oil 
in tank steamers and its sale in all coun- 
tries tributary to the Pacific Ocean ports. 

There is not a word of truth in 
the above. 

The bonds are not yet printed. 

The Combine does not control 
50 percent of the product of the 
Kern River and the McKittrick 
fields. Its claim of 80 and 90 per- 
cent is absurdly false. 

The Union Trust company has 
not agreed to float the bonds, and it 
is extremely improbable if any re- 
putable concern will agree to float 
them or even try to float them on 
the ground that the bonds are a 
good investment. 

That the money, if raised, will 
be used for tank steamers to and 
storage at Honolulu, Tacoma, and 
elsewhere is equally absurd. The 
Hawaiian Islands have bought 
their oil for years to come, and the 
Standard already has secured a 
foothold at Tacoma and other 
northern points that nothing can 
dislodge. 

The worst feature in this batch 
6'f misrepresentations is the state- 
ment that the Associated will 
make use of the Standard's pipe- 
line from Bakersfield to Point 
Richmond. 

The Associated has no more 
idea of being able to use the 
Standard's pipe-line than the devil 
has of tooting Gabriel's horn. 

The Combine has secured con- 
tracts for the delivery of, some say 
as high as, 20,000,000 barrels of 
crude oil in the next five years, 



the average price at the wells be- 
ing about 20 cents or less. 

These contracts have been se- 
cured by bidding against the 
Standard, and the only way the 
Combine can make any money is 
to secure a very material reduc- 
tion in transportation rates. This 
they cannot get from the railroads, 
and it is not likely the Standard 
will assist those in business who 
are competing with them by the 
methods employed by the Asso- 
ciated. 

As a matter of fact both the 
Standard and the Union exult 
over every big contract the Com- 
bine makes, as that only brings 
the finish of the Combine nearer 
and makes their wind-up a matter 
of less time. 

If the Combine has sold 20,000,- 
000 barrels of oil to be delivered 
in five years that means that it has 
practically mortgaged its property 
already to the amount of $4,000,- 
000. 

It also means that when the 
Combine will be taxing the oil re- 
sources of its property to the ut- 
most in order to fulfill these con- 
tracts, and is selling oil at 20 cents 
a barrel, the other companies will 
be having a ready sale for their 
oil at 50 cents or more a barrel. 

It further means that if the 
Combine throws up its hands in 
despair, and is unable to fulfill its 
contracts, that it will have people 
to deal with, like the Spreckles, 
who will make it pretty warm for 
some of the Combine's officials in 
a financial way. 

The Associated has not obtained 
the right to use the Standard's 
line, nor will it obtain that right. 

If the Combine does not furnish 
its promised oil it will have a lot 
of trouble on its hands. 

It cannot furnish that promised 
oil at a profit unless it gets cheap- 
er transportation. 

It cannot float its bonds when 
they are offered for sale. 

Unless it gets several million 
dollars it cannot build a pipe-line 
and sufficient tankage. 

It looks very much as if the 
Combine was " up against it," and 
all because it knocked the price of 
oil down to 10 cents in order to 
" force the producers in." 



and lower decks, and it is finished 
beautifully. Here are the quar- 
ters of the captain, mates, engin- 
neer and cook, while the kitchen 
will occupy a compartment by 
itself, and the dining-room an- 
other. There are also several 
bath-rooms in the cabin. Under 
the forward forecastle deck are 
the quarters for the crew, con- 
sisting of six iron berths and lock- 
ers, with bath-rooms adjoining. 
The pump-room is aft and the 
boiler-room forward. 

For machinery the craft has a 
Scotch boiler of twenty-eight tons, 
iixii feet. There are two fur- 
naces and two condensers, also a 
complete electric plant, with gen- 
erators and switchboard. She has 
a patent towing machine, also 
patent towing bitts, by which no 
strain comes on the vessel, while 
she is being towed when the 
hawser suddenly tightens, as it 
often does. There is a steam 
hoisting engine forward for the 
cargoes. 

As the barge is designed espe- 
cially for the Oriental oil carrying 
trade she is equipped with sixteen 
oil tanks with a capacity of 1,450,- 
000 gallons. She is also con- 
structed so as to carry oil for fuel, 
and has large tanks on both sides 
of her hull capable of carrying 
20,000 gallons. 

New Coal Field. 

The Randsburg Coal and Power 
company, which is operating the 
the coal mine five miles from Gar- 
lock, has made excellent progress 
and is down 145 feet with a $y 2 - 
foot ledge of what is claimed to 
be the best coal ever discovered in 



A MODERN IDEA. 



The New Oil Carrier of the 
Standard Oil Co. 

A new departure has been made 
in the construction of oil-carrying 
barge No. 93, recently built at 
Bath, Me., for the Standard Oil 
company. She has four hollow 
steel masts, while the foremast is 
somewhat larger in circumference 
than the others, being built to 
serve in the dual capacity of mast 
and smokestack. For this reason 
great caution was taken in step- 
ping it, so as to prevent any acci- 
dent at sea in a storm, and its 
connection with the boiler has 
been tested rigorously. The masts 
are all ninety-five feet in length. 

The decks are of steel. The 
wheel-house is aft, while the pilot- 
house is forward, on the forecastle 
deck. Both are elegantly equipped 
for the convenience of their occu- 
pants. The latter is finished in 
hard wood and furnished in the 
style of a rich man's library. A 
steam steering gear has been 
placed 011 the craft, so that the 
work of the helmsman will be 
easy. 

The cabin is between the main 



the State. The ledge is widening 
and it is expected that it will de- 
velop into a 12 or 15-foot ledge. 

The company in question is pre- 
paring to generate power on an 
extensive scale, and already it 
has three dynamos at the mine 
and three at Garlock. The poles 
for wires are also in place for the 
entire distance. 

The coal, it is said, will make an 
excellent quality of coke, and if 
this be true the deposit in connec- 
tion with the iron deposits in the 
San Emedio company will prove 
invaluable. 



Oil Displaces Coal. 

Oil is to be used as a fuel in the 
big refineries of the Standard Oil 
Company in New York, in the 
yards in Green Point and at Eong 
Island City. Oil fuel will be sup- 
plied to the furnaces underneath 
the stills by a device invented by 
Herbert M. Pratt, one of the mil- 
lionaire stockholders of the com- 
pany. For years the use of oil 
has been contemplated, but now, 
for the first time, the system will 
be given a test on a large scale. 
It is anticipated that thousands of 
gallons of oil will be consumed 
daily in this manner if the device 
proves successful. The use of oil 
is brought about by the shortage 
of coal. 

To Whom It May Concern. 

Boulder, Colo., Oct. 6, 1902. 
This is to certify that O. H. Jones, the 
oil locator of Los Angeles, Cal., located 
a well for the Otero Oil and Gas com- 
pany in the Boulder, Colo., oil fields in 
May, 1902; that the same was drilled in- 
to oil September 3, at a depth of 1,765 
feet; that since September 3 we have 
been pumping 100 barrels per day. This 
was not near any other producing well. 
F. J. CRETCHER, Director. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables»best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy -jS/s-'m., 55^-in. and 
4j£-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

lit North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL IN MEXICO. 



The Mexican Petroleum Com- 
pany to Bxpend Vast Sum». 

Development of Mexican oil 
properties is proceeding on a scale 
not fully understood in this coun- 
try. Los Angeles capitalists are 
interested. B. I.. Doheny, of Los 
Angeles, president of the Mexican 
Petroleum company, recently gave 
out a summary of the develop- 
ments in progress by his company 
in Mexico, and which are expected 
to cost over half a million dollars. 
They are as follows: 

Steel tankage, with a storage 
capacity of 4,000,000 gallons of 
oil, to cost >y.i,ooo; the building 
of nine kilometers of standard 
gauge railroad, at a cost of $90,- 
000; warehouse supplies, $90,000; 
an asphaltum refinery with a ca- 
pacity of 1,200 barrels daily; an 
electric plant to supply light and 
power, to cost $23,000; a cooper- 
age plant that will furnish 5,000 
staves daily, at a cost of $15,000; 
a machine shop complete in every 
particular and particularly adapt- 
ed for the building of oil well ma- 
chinery, and that will cost $12,250; 
a blacksmith shop that will have a 
steam hammer and all other mod- 
ern fittings for repairs as well as 
for new work and will cost $6,000; 
a planing and saw-mill of the most 
modern pattern to cost $6,500; an 
ice and cold storage plant to sup- 
ply 2,500 pounds of ice daily, and 
500 gallons of distilled water, and 
give 2,000 square feet of space for 
storing meats, fruits, vegetables, 
and other articles of food, for the 
use of the employees of the com- 
pany, and to cost $6,250, an air 
compressor, complete for handling 
building steel and working the 
drilling plant, will be put up at 
cost of $10,833; buildings, includ- 
ing offices, stores, residences, and 
bunk-houses, to cost $10,125. The 
company has just purchased in 
Texas a car load of mules with 
wagons and harness at a cost of 
$8,475. The company has given 
out a contract for one million 
brick to be made on the company's 
property, ready for building pur- 
poses, at a cost of $12,500. A pipe- 
line for water, fourteen miles lopg, 
with four-inch pipe, will be laid, 
and will cost $62,500. All these 
works are under way, or will be 
under way, as soon as the material 
reaches the ground, which must 
be very shortly, and will be put in 
operation at El Ebano. 



A BELT LINE. 



Point Richmond to Have Ade- 
quate Railroad Facilities- 
William S. Tevis, H. C. Breeden, 
D. G. Scofield, C. E. Worden, E. 
S. Pilsbury and others have incor- 



porated a company and are ready 
to begin building a belt railroad at 
Point Richmond, the present Santa 
Fe terminus in Contra Costa 
county. The belt-road will be 
about twenty miles long and W. 
S. Tevis is the official head of the 
company. 

The Standard Oil company is 
completing a big refining plant in 
the Point Richmond district, and 
the pipe-line from Bakersfield will 
also have its terminus there. From 
its property, the Standard Oil com- 
pany has a spur track out to the 
Santa Fe main line. The spur 
track also connects with a branch 
line the Southern Pacific has built 
into the Point Richmond district 
from San Pablo on its main line. 
Just north of the Standard Oil 
property, the Southern Pacific has 
eighty-seven acres which it will 
shortly convert into a big terminal. 

The proposed belt-road will start 
from the Standard Oil company's 
end of the spur track and run in 
a semicircle as far north as San 
Pablo point. The route will be by 
way of Castro and Molate points. 
At the three points mentioned 
docks are to be constructed. The 
Southern Pacific and Standard Oil 
will have docks of their own. 

The new belt-line will in no way 
interfere with a large system of 
freight tracks the Southern Pacific 
is to lay on its property in the 
near future. 



A HOME-MADE I5URM !R 



OIL ANALYSIS. 



Calif or ia Oils the Subject of 
Scientific Inquiry. 

The oils of California are receiv- 
ing elaborate study from the de- 
partment of chemistry of the Uni- 
versity of California. The inves- 
tigations deal with the chemical 
properties, economic possibilities, 
and relative qualities of petro- 
leums from various fields, as com- 
pared with oils from other States 
and countries. Professor Edmond 
O'Neill spent last summer in the 
Texas oil fields, and he plans an 
early visit to the wonderful de- 
posits at Baku and elsewhere in 
European Russia. 

Many chemical discoveries have 
been made in the chemical labora- 
tories at Berkeley. The smokeless 
powder used by the United States 
was the invention of W. C. Pey- 
ton, '87, a graduate of the college 
of chemistry. A valuable new ex- 
plosive was recently devised by E. 
A. Starke, a former assistant in 
chemistry. It was an assistant in 
the chemical laboratory, Adolph 
Sommer, who invented lucol and 
viscol, paint and leather oils, 
which have come to be of much 
commercial importance. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Oii, 
Reportse. 



Simple But Successful I 
Crude Oil an a I ucl. 
Benjamin P, 
ton, l>cl., lias installed n burner in 
his home with which hensea crude 
Texas oil as fuel. The barn 
about two feet in eircUmfei 
with many outlets tor the Ignition 
of the oil. In a stable at the rear 
of Mr. Shaw's lirmie the barrel of 
oil, containing about fifty gallons, 
is placed. It is connected with the 
burner by a pipe that conveys the 
liquid fuel. So far Mr. Shaw has 
experienced no annoyance from 
odors arising from the burning 
oil. Its general results are said to 
be as satisfactory as a coal fire, 
and it is much more economical. 
The barrel of oil costs less than 
four cents a gallon, and the burner 
consumes about half a gallon an 
hour. It is installed beneath a 
hot-water heater, which thorough- 
ly heats the "fifteen rooms in the 
house evenly and comfortably. 



In New Mexico. 

I., has given notice 

to por- 
Aineri- 
companj 

of oil land in 
inty, New Mexico. 

The PaUJic Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 
Parrott Build 

San Francisco, ( 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
t it 'ii. Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

IP ANTES incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds underwrit- 
ten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GOLD! 

Never Goes Begging 

It is always at par. You don't have to seek a market or 
discount your goods. You are not subject to the dictation 
or control of the trusts. Fort hese and many other reasons 
a good gold property is one of the best investments, and 
stock in a company having a gold property of proven 
merit, managed by men of honesty and mining ability, 
offers to the poor man one of the best avenues to 
independence. Such a proposition is the 

Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owning the Hudson group of mines in the Big Bug Dis- 



trict, Arizona, surrounded by rich 
producing mines. To continue 
development a block of treasury 
stock is now being sold at 

Send for particulars. 



10 



CENTS 

PER SHARB 

Par Value $1.00 
Full Paid, 
Nou-Assessable. 



W. G. YOUNG & CO., II 



seal 
gents 



628-630 Laughlin BIdg. 
BANK REFERENCES Los Angeles, Cal. 



READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



IS THE B EST 



R. H. HEBRON CO. 



411 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



6 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners* Association- 

W. B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $250 

Six Months * 5° 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies IOC 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32*33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a sfiiBi-fltitee of good faith; 

No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal., 
as second-class matter. 

FRIDAY . . . NOVEMBER 7, 1902 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



With this number the Pacific 
Oil Reporter 
A New Volume enters upon its 
fourth year. 
This is the only oil journal pub- 
lished on the Pacific coast, and in 
fact is the only oil journal pub- 
lished this side of the Pennsyl- 
vania oil fields, the two others 
published on the Atlantic sea- 
board being the National Oil Re- 
porter of New York, devoted prin- 
cipally to booming the sale of 
stocks of companies which have 
more or less the nature of fake 
schemes; the other oil journal be- 
ing the Petroleum Gazette, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., which is a monthly 
publication. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter 
commences its fourth year under 
most favorable auspices. 

By careful attention to the pro- 
gress of the development of the 
different oil fields on the Pacific 
coast this paper has become the 
source of authoritative information 
not only as to actual field work 
but as to the standing of various 
oil companies. 

The circulation has increased 
until it is read in every state of 
the Union, and goes abroad to 
foreign countries where interest is 
being manifested by capitalists in 
the opportunities presented by 
the California oil industry for 
profitable investment. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter 
has its own complete printing 
plant which enables it to meet the 
peculiar wants of an oil journal 
and of the oil men especially as 
regards job printing, circular and 
prospectus work. On its shelves, 
carefully indexed, are maps and 
half-tone cuts of all the fields, 
showing the properties of all the 
large producing companies, and 
representing considerable capital 
and labor. 

Our facilities for obtaining full 
and correct oil news are unsur- 
passed, and the increasing patron- 



age given the paper is substantial 
evidence that our attempts to meet 
the requirements of the oil public 
are appreciated. 



It is given out from authoritative 
sources that 
A Big Mortgage the Assoc- 
iated Oil 
companies have contracted to de- 
liver twenty million barrels of oil 
within the next five years. The 
price is understood to be 20 cents 
a barrel, although it is strongly 
asserted that this quotation is too 
high. 

Granting it to be correct the 
Associated has agreed to furnish 
twenty million barrels of crude oil 
in the next five years for the sum 
of four million dollars. 

This means that it has in reality 
mortgaged its property for that, 
amount, equal to the amount of 
the mortage the Associated de- 
sires to float for the purpose of 
building pipe-lines, storage, etc. 

While the Associated will be 
exhausting its oil supply the 
price of oil generally will be 
steadily advancing; and while 
this company will be taxing its re- 
sources to the utmost to supply 
this vast amount of crude oil at 
20 cents, the other companies will 
be receiving at the lowest calcu- 
lation 50 cents a barrel. 

The prospect for future divi 
dends to the stockholders of the 
Associated looks worse than ever. 
The officers however continue 
cheerfully to draw down $90,000 
in salaries. 



The figures given in the table on 
the third page 
Figures Teach of this issue 
a Lesson ought to teach 

an important 
lesson to oil and asphalt pro- 
ducers. 

Read the list of prevailing prices 
in oil and asphalt from 1887 down 
to 1902 and note how they have 
steadily lowered. 

As regards oil the money re- 
ceived in 1902 for 12,500,000 bar- 
rels will not equal the amount re- 
ceived in 1899 for 2,677,875 bar- 
rels. 

The conditions to-day are pro- 
portionately the same as they 
were then. 

In 1899 the production was as 
much greater than the consump- 
tion as it is to-day. No railroads, 
steamship companies, or great 
manufacturing concerns were us- 
ing oil. The supply was greater 
than the demand, just as it is now. 
Yet in 1899, when the production 
was not one-sixth what it is to- 
day the amount of money re- 
ceived for the oil by the pro- 
ducers was greater than that re- 
ceived in 1902. 

1899— 1,667,87s barrels 12,660,793 

1902 — 12,500,000 barrels 12,500,000 

This is a nice contrast, isn't it? 
Whose fault is it? 
Ask B. F. Brooks, the sales man- 
ager of the Associated Oil com- 



panies, if he knows where the 
blame should rest. 

In two years this tate will be 
required to produce at least 20,- 
000,000 barrels of oil a year, and 
each year will see these require- 
ments increased until the oil re- 
sources of the different California 
fields will be taxed to the utmost, 
just as they are to-day of the East- 
ern fields. 

This senseless competition to 
sell oil at ruinously low figures 
should stop. 

This oil that is now being of- 
fered at 20 cents and less is worth 
at the wells at least 50 cents. 

The Standard knows it, and is 
buying up all the oil it can store. 
In the Kern River field alone the 
Standard has seventy-five tanks, 
holding over 3,000,000 barrels full 
of oil that has been offered the 
company, some of it as low as 10 
cents. 

Every barrel of that oil is to- 
day worth 50 cents. 

The time will come, and that 
sooner than is expected, when our 
oil fields will be taxed to the ut- 
most. 

Keep your oil in the ground, 
rather than sell it at present 
rates. You are making money by 
holding it. In two years the value 
of oil will have trebled, and you 
will reap the benefit. 



EASTERN IGNORANCE. 



Wilful op Ignorant Misrepresent- 
ations of Our OH Industry. 

Dr. C. T. Deane, secretary of the 
California Petroleum Miner's As- 
sociation, has received a letter 
from New Haven, Conn., asking if 
an enclosed editorial from a New 
Haven paper is true, and that the 
California railroad companies have 
decided to discontinue the use of 
oil as fuel. 

The editorial is as follows: 

"ANOTHER STORY. 

" The worst wipe oil has re- 
ceived lately is in the statement 
that after making a test of oil as 
fuel on its passenger locomotives 
for ten months, the Southern Pa- 
cific railroad has decided to return 
to the use of bituminous coal, and 
its mines at Carbonado have re- 
ceived orders to begin shipping 
25,000 tons a month. It is re- 
ported that oil was not a success 
on the passenger locomotives for 



two reasons: One, that it deposited 
a coating on the flues, which had 
to be removed every day, or it 
kept the heat from the water, 
causing a great waste of fuel. The 
other was that the intense heat 
produced by the oil cracked and 
split the boiler sheets." 

Dr. Deane, in reply to the let- 
ter, wrote the following: 
" San Francisco, Cal., Nov. 4, 1902. 

" Mr. Geo. McKendrick, 
" Railroad Office Bldg., 
" New Haven, Conn. 

" My Dear Sir: 

" The slip enclosed by you 
and headed ' Another Story ' is 
one issue of falsehoods from be- 
ginning to end. Crude fuel oil at 
one dollar a barrel (42 gallons) is 
equal to coal at three and a half 
dollars per ton. There are about 
300 steam boilers using crude oil 
now in San Francisco. Most of 
them have been using it for two 
years past. I have not heard of a 
single one returning to coal, but 
on the contrary those using oil 
say they would not use coal 
again even if they could get it as 
cheap as oil. The Southern Pa- 
cific company is using oil now on 
about 200 locomotives and placing 
their tankage all along their lines 
for the purpose of using it exclu- 
sively. The Santa Fe Railroad is 
using oil exclusively on 21.6 of its 
295 locomotives in service on its 
Pacific branch. The general man- 
ager writes me as follows: 'We 
propose to and in fact are at the 
present using oil fuel exclusively.' 
The railroads of California will use 
in the year 1903 between eight 
and nine million barrels of oil. I 
enclose you Bulletin No. 2 from this 
Association, which will inform you 
of the use of oil in marine boilers, 
as well as those on land. The ar- 
ticle you quote is no doubt sug- 
gested by some of the coal barons 
of the East. We don't have to tell 
any lies about oil. It is the fuel 
of the 20th century, and in fifty 
years now we will look back on 
the use of coal as we do now on 
the use of a stage coach. It is 
more economical, cleaner and safer 
both for land and sea than coal. 
The above information is official. 
" Yours very truly, 
" (Signed) C. T. Deane, 

" Secretary." 



'More Oil-Burners. 

George J. Willey, general man- 
ager of the L,a Conner, Wash., 
Trading and Transportation com- 
pany, announces that his com- 
pany has decided to substitute oil 
for coal in generating power for 
the operation of its fleet of eight 
Puget sound steamers. A Cali- 
fornia oil company expects to put 
in tanks and supply stations in 
Seattle. 





MAY BE HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

From Nov. i, 1899, to Nov. 1, 1900 $6.00 

From Nov. 1, 1900, to Nov. i, 1901 6.00 

From Nov. i, 1901, to Nov. i, 1902 5.00 


Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 


These volumes are strongly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
oil industry on the Pacific coast. 


Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal* 





PACIPIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 

Recent Developments Which Have Made OH One of the 
Greatest Industries In the Far West- 



ALAS 

Marcus Anderson of San Fran- 
cisco has secured several oil claims 
on Cook Inlet, Alaska. He has 
commenced development work, 
and two weeks ago was able to se- 
cure a tub of crude oil of seeming- 
ly high grade. He shipped this 
oil by steamer to San Erancisco, 
where it will be refined, for the 
purpose of showing just what 
grades of oil can be expected from 
the Cook Inlet fields. Anderson 
has offers of financial assistance 
from California, with which to de- 
velop his properties as soon as he 
is ready. This news is brought 
by R. C. Edmonds, who for four 
years has been mining on Cook 
Inlet. He says that oil in good 
quantities is being drawn from 
several wells in that section. He 
has been over large areas during 
the past four years, findinc. oil in- 
dications in nearly every locality. 
As far as they have been exam- 
ined, the oil fields extend about 
thirty miles inland from Cook In- 
let. Numerons locations have been 
made, but the development is in 
its infancy. 

FRESNO. 

It is reported on good authority 
that oil has been struck on the 
plains eight miles west of Huron. 
Many who are conversant with 
the character of the plains in that 



locality have been predicting this 
for years. It looks as though pros- 
pecting for oil on the Huron plains 
will become quite general before 
long now. 

KERN 

At the Keru River oil fields 
there are now standing seventy- 
five huge tanks, having an aver- 
age capacity of 35,000 barrels, 
filled with oil, erected and owned 
by the Standard Oil company 
alone. 

The Union Oil company has let 
the contract for the excavation of 
a mammoth reservoir on the Clare- 
mont tract. This reservoir will be 
about 250 feet in diameter, with 
proportionate depth, and holds 
about 250,000 barrels. 

The Peerless company has de- 
cided to renew development on a 
large scale, and is about to begin 
a large water well for the pur- 
poses of drilling. It is said that 
it has agreed to furnish the 
Standard a much greater quan- 
tity of oil than it is now supply- 
ing, and to secure the production 
will sink other wells. 

H. W. McCray, who has been 
engaged for some weeks in secur- 
ing transportation contracts for 
the proposed Midland Pacific, was 
in San Francisco last week, and 
reported an encouraging condition 



of affairs, and a good prospect for 
the early construction of the road. 
It is reported that an early change 
will occur in the list of those who 
are promoting the enterprise. 

The California Combined Oil 
company has lately acquired pos- 
session of the property formerly 
owned by the (".ray Gander Oil 
company. The property is lo- 
cated on section 7, 2828, not far 
distant from the Ed son. The plans 
of the new company are to begin 
drilling as soon as the necessary 
preparations can be made and to 
complete one of the wells com- 
menced by the Gray Gander. 

The Pacific Oil company, with 
headquarters at Indianapolis, has 
acquired the interestsof the Royal 
Sunset on section 35, 12-24. There 
are now two wells on the prop- 
erty, one of which has been 
drilled a year. 1 he other was 
more recently finished, and has 
not been perforated, but flows 
from between the casings. It is 
presumed to be a better well than 
No. 1, which will do fifty barrels 
a day with the cap off. This prop 
erty lies in a direct line between 
the big wells around the J. B. B., 
and those in the neighborhood of 
the Monarch. 

LOS ANGELBS. 
The Whittier-Fillmore Oil com- 
pany, operating on what is known 
as the Tubbs-Evans tract, has its 
well down 2,100 feet. For 200 feet 
the drill has been in oil sand, not 
all of which has been filled with 
oil. The company plans to go as 
deep as possible, as the sand is 
known to be both deep and rich. 

ORANGE. 

Well No. §5 on Puente lease has 



been put on the pump, and is pit 
ducing 150 barrels of oil a day. 

Brea Canyon Oil company will 
commence another well soon. 

Iowa Oil company, which re- 
cently resumed drilling on its land 
south of Olinda, has abandoned 
its well for good. 

Fullerton Consolidated Oil com- 
pany has sold its entire output to 
the Standard Oil company for five 
years and will sink several more 
wells at once. 

Santa Fe company has com- 
menced work on its thirty-ninth 
well. It is located in the hill back 
of Fullerton Oil company's prop- 
erties and due south of No. 36, 
which is now drilling with every 
prospect of being a good producer. 

Drilling is being prosecuted on 
the Iowa Oil company's land as 
fast as the hole can be put down, 
working day and night, with the 
very best indications. We fully 
expect one of the best wells in the 
Fullerton field, as there has not 
been an oil expert on the ground 
but who has pronounced the in- 
dications excellent; and now that 
we have attained the depth we 
have, with our present indications, 
we are more confident than ever. 

"There is not a drop of oil for 
sale in the Fullerton oil field." 
This statement is made by a pro- 
ducer of this territory who de- 
clared that half of the operators 
were just able to keep up with the 
requirements of contracts, and 
that was all. The Standard has 
had agents in the field, and now 
practically takes care of the entire 
output of light oil, and would 
take more if it could get it. The 
Santa Fe, Fullerton Oil and sev- 



THE 



ELK HORN 
CONSOLIDATED 

OIL COMPANY 



J. G. JURY, President J. M. BOTTS, Vice-President 

H. B. WORCESTER, Secretary and Treasurer 



Capitalization, $2,500,000 1 Present Selling Price of 
Par Value of Shares, $1.00 f Stock = = = - 30 Cents 



Owns 1,400 Acres of Oil Land in Sunset, 
Midway and McKittrick Districts. 



Main Office, 470, 471 and 472 PARROTT BUILDING 



San Francisco, Cal. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



eral others have been selling to 
that corporation for some time. 

Negotiations for valuable hold- 
ings in the Fullerton field are 
again pending. Although great 
secrecy is maintained, enough has 
leaked out to establish the fact 
that a syndicate backed by Los 
Angeles and Eastern capital is 
after some of the undeveloped 
property in this district. The syn- 
dicate, which is still working in 
the dark, has had experts exam- 
ining certain corners of the field, 
and is satisfied that it has discov- 
ered a corner where very light oil 
could be developed. Through of- 
ficers of the Fullerton Oil com- 
pany some leases are sad to have 
been closed, the property being in 
a corner of the territory that has 
always been regarded as out of 
the oil belt. Negotiations are now 
pending for additional territory, 
and when options have been ob- 
tained the syndicate will begin 
drilling. — Fullerton Tribune. 

The ready market for light oil, 
especially the Fullerton product, 
has been the incentive for pros- 
pecting. At present the pro- 
ducers of refining oil are receiv- 
ing from $1.40 to $1.70 a barrel 
from the Standard, and the market 
is practically unlimited. One of 
the most successful producers of 
the light gravity liquid in the 
State is the Santa Fe company, 
which is making a good thing out 
of the oil business. This com- 
pany is producing thousands of 
barrels of light oil a month in the 
Fullerton district, and is selling 
part of the output to the Standard 
at close to $1.50 a barrel. Part 
of the oil it is using in its engines 
is purchased in the Kern river 



field at very near 20 cents a bar- 
rel. The Standard now has agents 
in this and other fields closing 
contracts for all of the light oil it 
can secure. It now takes about all 
of the product of the Santa Paula 
and Newhall fields, but is after 
more. With such a market, it is 
not surprising that capitalists will 
take risks in pioneering in sec- 
tions where there are indications 
that light oil will be struck. — Full- 
erton Tribune. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The liquid asphalt well of the 
Columbian Asphalt company, at 
Carpinteria, is past i.too feet and 
everything working smoothly. 

The well of the Crescent Oil 
company, on Ortega hill, Sum- 
merland, is past 600 feet and work 
progressing satisfactorily. Drill- 
ing operations are necessarily slow 
on this well, as the formation 
stands at a very abrupt angle, and 
unceasing watchfulness and care- 
ful drilling are the price of a 
straight hole. 

C. W. Ayers, a well-known oil 
operator of this city and Los An 
geles, states that his chemists have 
discovered products in the crude 
oil of Summerland not before 
known to exist. What these are 
Mr. Ayers does not state, but be- 
low Summerland he has had twen- 
ty men at work for thirty days 
building a refinery, where these 
recently discovered products are 
to be refined. This new refinery 
will probably be ready by the mid- 
dle of the month to handle 500 
barrels per day. Later, probably 
by December 1, this capacity will 
be increased 50 per cent. The 
refinery is the property of the 



Columbian Oil and Asphalt com- 
pany. 

SAN BENITO. 

Everything is in readiness at 
the oil rig of the Ladd Oil com- 
pany on the Croxon rauch, and 
operations will begin as soon as 
the drillers arrive and a day and 
night shift will be put on. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO. 

The two tanks to be erected at 
San Luis Obispo are to be located 
opposite the roundhouse in the 
hillside. Work on the excava- 
tions has been in progress for 
some time, but is not yet entirely 
completed. The heighth of each 
tank is completed at 30 feet, with 
a diameter of 115 feet, and will 
contain over a million gallons of 
fuel. To fill these large recep- 
tacles will require 330 carloads of 
oil. 

SAN MATEO. 

The Knapp refinery has now 
but one still in place with a capa- 
city of 40 barrels of crude oil 
daily. As the main oil well from 
which the supply is at present 
derived is badly choked up, and 
will not be cleared out for some 
days while the tools are employed 
on a new well, the present capa- 
city will not be immediately in- 
creased. It is the intention of 
Mr. Knapp to put in another still 
which will treble the present ca- 
pacity of the refinery. As new 
wells are opened up, and the oil 
supply increases, the capacity of 
the refinery will be correspond- 
ingly increased. 

STANISLA0S. 
At an adjourned annual meet- 
ing of the stockholders of the Mt. 
Oso Oil company, held at Gray- 



son last week, there were elected 
for directors for the ensuing year 
Messrs. A. Hewel, Fred Bartch, 
Chas. Elfers, John Elfers, S. W. 
Howard, Ed. Brush and Mat. 
Weisser. The stockholders in- 
structed the directors to collect 
irotn all delinquents, or in lieu of 
payment to tccept surrender of 
stock; failing both, the delin- 
quents are to be sued for the 
amounts due. It developed that 
4i additional shares of stock have 
been subscribed for, representing 
$3,280. The board of directors or- 
ganized by electing Fred. Bartch, 
president, and A. Hewel, vice- 
president. J. R. McDonald, Jr., 
was elected Secretary and the 
First National Bank of Modesto, 
treasurer. The new well is down 
600 feet, but the drill has been 
"lost" and ' fishing" has been in 
progress for a fortnight. On Tues- 
day the prospects were favorable 
for recovering it. Failing, how- 
ever, the driller will start a new 
well. He is to bore to a depth of 
1,500 feet, if necessary, or no pay, 
and is to receive $5,100 if he puts 
a well down to that depth. The 
well is in the Coast range. 

TEHAMA. 

It is understood that the South- 
ern Pacific company will build 
another monster oil tank at Red 
Bluff by the side of the one now 
nearly finished, on the land just 
north of Brewery creek, the work 
to be commenced next spring. 
The two tanks they now have 
here will hold, the smaller one 
1,260,000 and the large one 2,310,- 
000 gallons. The third tank will 
be also of 55,000 barrel capacity, 
and the three will afford storage 
for nearly 6,000,000 gallons. 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that buys the oil and pays #1.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes THE HIGHEST GRADE gaso- 
line, BENZINE AND KEROSENE OF ANY REFINERY ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 



$89 buys 100 Shares in each of four companies, or 
400 shares lull-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment. 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
337 percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 450 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
900,000 shares held in trust by us. 



The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

"There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52 Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade forilluminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity that has ever come to this State slip into compantively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because they did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
any speculative venture, but in actually proven lands, which can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $5,000 per acre, and which in a few 
years will be worth five times that price." 



Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three. Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates 900,000 shares. 
We act as trustee foi this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will be taken up and the pooled 
stock of the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus if three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
payer the investment would still yield 12 1£ percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that ' 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 



THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HAI/FMOON BAY OIL FIELDS. One com- 
pany is pumping 52 gravity oil, selling it at $1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1,150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well ; third company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset, 
and land holdings, drilling rig, and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 

INDEX. 

Facts Worth Reading , Costly Advertising 

Investigations Why Some Corporations Fail 

Trust Fund Our Plan 

Debentures A Word About Our Business 

Experienced Management A Good Thing to Do 

A Word of Caution Satisfied Stockholders 

Our Invariable Rule The Percent of Failures 

No Man Always Knows A Refinery 

I,oans to Customers Maps and Photographs 

Our Profits Ten Reasons Why 

The Big Four The Price of Oil 

Directors of The Oil Companies Press Notes 

Reports Upon The Property Faithin Oil 

Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 



THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL OIL PROPOSITION: 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade oil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 

Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



BIG GAS ENGINES. 



America Bnckwiird in Giih En- 
gine Development. 
Id a paper read before the en- 
gineering section of the British 
association at the recent meeting 
at Belfast. Mr. H. A. Humphrey 
traced the development of gas en- 
gines and the remarkable progress 
that has been made, especially 
within the last few yeats. En- 
gines of 1,200 and 1,500 horse- 
power are already in use, but 
larger ones are now being con- 
structed and certain manufacturers 
are prepared to build them up to 
5,000 horse-power. Exclusive of 
engines ot less than 200 horse- 
power, there have been so far 
supplied in Great Britain 17,600 
horse-power of Crossley and 
Fremium engines, while of the 
Continental manufacturers, the 
Koerting brothers, or their li- 
censees, have built 32 with a total 
of 44,500 horse-power (averaging 
1,390 horse-power per eugine), 
the Societe, John Cockerill 59, 
with an aggregate of 32,950 horse- 
power, (averaging 558 horse- 
power), the Gasmotoren Fabrik 
Deutz, 51, with a total of 20,655 
horse-power, and the Deutsche 
Rraftgas Gesellschaft, 28, giving 
16,900 hoise-power. America has 
been more backward in gas en- 
gine development, but the West- 
inghouse company has made en- 
gines of 1,500 horse-power, and is 
prepared to build them of 3,000 
horse-power, either horizontal or 
vertical, while the Snow Steam 
Pump Works, which has only re- 
cently entered this field, has al- 
ready put in successful use six 
engines of 1,000 horse-power each, 
and is now constructing two gas 
engine gas compressors of 4,000 
horse-power each, the first of 
which is expected to be in opera- 
tion in November, 1902, and the 
second in January, 1903. Mr. 
Humphrey described the principal 
types of gas engines, and discussed 
the lines upon which develop- 
ment is progressing. 



A New Under-Reamer. 

The National Supply company 
of Los Angeles, Bakersfield and 
McKittrick, are bringing out a 
new under-reamer, called the 
National. This is the simplest 
under-reamer that has yet been 
devised, and a half dozen cf them 
have been put in operation in 
the Los Angeles field, and a ship- 
ment of two was recently made to 
Mexico. 

It may not be generally known 
that the National Supply com- 
pany are the only concern on the 
Pacific coast dealing in oil well 
tools and supplies who control 
their own plant for the manufac- 
ture of drilling and fishing tools. 
Such is the case, however, and for 
this reason they are able to give 
better satisfaction to those in need 
of drilling or fishing tools than 
could possibly be the case if the 
tools had been ordered from the 
East. Send for a circular of their 
new under reamer to 117 North 
Main street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Made Quick Time. 

The steamer Nevadan, burning 
oil, arrived at Honolulu a day 
ahead of time on her last trip from 
San Francisco, making over 300 
miles a day. She made the trip 
from San Francisco in seven days 



and three lion: is a good 

deal fs-ter thau any of her line 
hitherto made it. 
In a dispatch trt.ni Sydnej 
S. \\\, the correspondent of the 
Dailj at the British 

tank steamer Clam, Captain 
Evans, belonging to the Shell 
Transport and Trading company, 
has arrived there from Batoum, 
Kuasia. The Clam lists oil for 
fuel, anil she made a record voy- 
age. The use of oil increased her 
i by half a knot an hour. 
Her daily consumption was eigh- 
teen tons of oil, as against a for- 
mer consumption of twenty six 
tons of coal. The crew of the 
Clam is at present one-third 
smaller than it was when she 
burned coal. 



Difference in Profits. 

The oil men say that if the As- 
sociated is up against it now, the 
present is nothing as compared 
to the pickle they will be in after 
the first of the year when their 
Spreckles' contracts commence. 
These require the delivery of oil 
at the rate of 700 barrels a day. 
Think of it! All this oil at 54 
cents a barrel! Exhausting their 
oil supply at a profit of about 2 
cents a barrel! The railroad gets 
42 cents a barrel for hauling and 
its profit per day on the 700-bar- 
rel contract will be $140 as against 
$14 for the Associated. 

If the Combine officers do not 
look out they will not be able to 
count up enough profits to pay 
themselves $90,000 a year in 
salaries. 



Oil Trust in Asia. 

The London Ironmonger an- 
nounces the formation of an 
Asiatic petroleum trust with a 
capital of $10,000,000. The new 
corporation comprises the Shell 
Transport and Trading company's 
tank fleet and Texas properties 
and the vessels and oriental wells 
belonging to the Royal Dutch 
Indian Petroleum company of 
of Amsterdam. It is announced 
that the new combine will 
concern itself exclusively with 
the sale of oil in the far East and 
of benzine in Europe, operating 
under the name of the Asiatic 
Petroleum company of London. 



A New Departure. 

Preparations have been made 
for fitting all the steamers of the 
Pacific Mail Steamship company 
to burn oil. Nine of the vessels 
are now in the trade between San 
Francisco and Panama, and three 
others are on the run to Asiatic 
ports. According to the plan it 
is proposed to establish oil supply 
stations at Panama, at Honolulu 
and at one of the Japanese ports. 
The station at Panama may be 
supplied from the wells in Peru 
and the one in the Orient, from 
Russia. 

The Deepest Well. 

The deepest hole made by man 
in the United States is owned by 
the West Elizabeth Gas company 
in Allegheny county, Pa., where 
a total depth was obtained of 5,535 
feet, considerably more than a 
mile. The temperature of this 
well was taken some time ago as 
follows: Five hundred feet from 
the surface, 57 Fahrenheit; 5,000 
feet down, 120 Fahrenheit; at 
5,400 feet, 127 . 



OIL-BURNING STEAMER. 



Liquid Fuel n Success on an 
\ilnntlc Liner. 
I the lirst time in the history 
of Atlantic navigation a passenger 
liner has crossed the ocean with 
oil for fuel, under one of her boil- 
ers. The Red Star steamship Ken- 
sington, Captain J. B. Hill, accom- 
plished this feat. The Kensington 
sailed from Antwerp on October 
25 and reached her pier Tuesday 
evening, bringing 133 cabin and 
666 steerage passengers. 

Chief Engineer Perris reported 
to Supervising Engineer John Car- 
negie of the International Naviga- 
tion company, that crude kerosene 
oil had been burned continuously 
Instead of coal under the single- 
ended boiler of the ship. The test 
was apparently a success. 

': Whether oil has affected the 
boiler, or tubes, we cannot tell," 
said Carnegie to-night, "as we have 
not yet made an inspection. 



Has Struck Oil. 

Last Saturday morning word 
was received by the Pinal Oil and 
Development company from the 
well which the company is put- 
ting down a mile and a half north 
of the Western Union company's 
holdings in the Carreaga oil field, 
that there was eighty feet of oil 
in the well and that it was time to 
send down a c se of champagne to 
the men at the well. When the 
well had reached a depth of 1,270 
feet it was determined to continue 
it with eight-inch drive pipe, the 



pipe used before having been 
11 and five-eighths casing. 
During the few days that work 
iiscontinued. awaiting the 
arrival of the eight-inch pipe, it 
"und on resuming operations 
that eighty feet of oil had accumu- 
lated in the well. The strike was 
a complete surprise as it was not 
known that oil sand had been 
reached. The oil is 21 gravity, 
which is the same as that found 
in the wells belonging to the West- 
ern Union Co. A further test was 
made at the Betteravia sugar fac- 
tory which was most satisfactory. 
Drilling will proceed at once. 
When the oil sand is penetrated 
the exact nature of the find will 
be made known. The strike in 
this well demonstrates that the 
Carreaga field is larger than at 
first supposed. 



Scrippers Lose Again. 

The Supreme Court of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia has overruled a 
motion for a rehearing made by 
the Cosmos Exploration Company 
and the Riverside Oil Company 
of California, in their case against 
the Secretary of the Interior, in- 
volving large oil land interests in 
the Kern River district. 

The company sought to have 
the courts declare these lands va- 
cant and open to settlement. The 
court held that such action is dis- 
cretionary with the Interior De- 
partment, and not subject to con- 
trol by the court. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FOROIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Kig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal.. Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench 



For carrying and placing 
bits in drilling stem boxes 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 

MANOFACTORED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 




PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

Largest Supply of Fishing Tools I No other company has all the odd 
in California Kept for Rent. sizes as we have. 



Phone, Black 1071, 



BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

Oil stocks continue to advance on the 
Los Angeles Stock Exchange and the 
volume of business apparently increases 
in proportion. During the past week 
thousands of shares uf the better known 
oil stocks appeared on the market at 
prices slightly in advance of the closing 
quotations of a week ago. The most ac- 
tive traders have been Central, Colum- 
bia, Reed Crude and Union, although 
considerable trading was distributed 
among a number of the other listed oils. 
Central has remained about stationary 
at 60 cents, although no offerings were 
made at the close of the week's business 
at less than 62. During the early part 
of the week Columbia was traded in at 
15 cents and later advanced to 15 X A, and 
closed strong at i6j£, under brisk bid- 
ding at the end of the week's trading. 
Reed Crude registered 25 cents during 
the early trading, and made a strong 
finish at 25% at the close, many large 
blocks having changed hands. Union 
sold in quantity at I55, coming in for a 
strong finish on Saturday at $56.50 un- 
der the influence of active bidding. 

Trading in the unlisted oils was slug- 
gish, and few changes were made in the 
prices either way. 

The decline of Verde King was one of 
the most notable features of the list of 
mining securities. This stock has been 
holding fairly firm at about 27 cents, 
sliding off to 20 cents toward the end of 
the week. Butte Lode advanced about a 
dollar a share, and exhibited a good de- 
mand at $29.50, with none offered. Small 
blocks of Bisbee West have gone over 
the board at from 12 to 13 cents. Under 
the influence of favorable reports on re- 
cent development work Hudson Gold 
Mining company's stock was very active 
at 5 cents during the early days of the 
week, and advanced to 9 cents bid on 
Saturday. 

Shares of the various banks continue 
to command such high premiums that 
little or no trading is possible. 

The usual inactivity prevailed among 
the miscellaneous securities. 



New Use of Oil. 

Charles H. Kuenzel, of San 
Francisco, has invented a dry gas 
which he claims is a mixture of 
15 per cent of crude oil with 85 
per cent of air. The mixing is 
effected at a high temperature 
and by pressure and the resulting 
gas is dry and non-explosive. Re- 
fined oil is used in making this 
gas. 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, Novembers: 
HANFORD. 

2 at $90 00 $ 180 00 

HOME OIL. 

500 at 2 80 -. 1,400 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

4 000 at 05 200 00 

1,500 at 04 6000 

1,000 at 04(C) 4000 

JUNCTION. 



1, 100 at 
100 at 



200 at 
900 at 
500 at 

1,000 at 

50 at 

100 at 
100 at 



500 at 
100 at 



100 at 



10. 
II. 



MONTE CRISTO. 
I 10 (B 10) . 



A Transportation Co. 

The Union Transportation com- 
pany corporation, allied with the 
Union Oil company, has incor- 
porated in Los ADgeles with a 
capital stock of $3,000,000, divided 
into 30,000 snares, fu ly sub- 
scribed. The directors are Lyman 
Stewart, Frederick H. Rlndga, W. 
L. Stewart, W. F. Botsford and J. 
S. Torrance, all of Los Angeles. 
Each of the directors owns one 
share ot stock, the remainder be- 
ing held by the Union Oil com 
pany. ' 

Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 
Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



oTA (B 30) 

1 07K 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

13 

PEERLESS. 

825 

REED CRUDE. 

26 

27 

STERLING. 

155(C) 

I 55 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 
1 32% 



no 00 
11 00 



220 00 
967 50 
537 50 



130 00 
412 50 



26 00 

27 00 



775 00 
155 00 



132 5o 



11,752 Shares 



Amount $5,384.00 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L- CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. BWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building. Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Building, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold ■ 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, S. F. 



JOSEPH BY TOPLITZ, 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA. STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 385 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Home," paying monthly dividends of J% cents per share. 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"United Tonopah" 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Lightner," paying monthly dividends of 5 cents per share, 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Write to the undersigned for information regarding Oil and 
Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, returning 10 
percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSBPH B. TOPLITZ 

330 Pine Street, Sao Francisco, Cat. 



Palm Packers 



SO Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write «J. D. Johnston, 

Newport, R. I. 



Annual Meeting. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCK- 
holders of the Flashlight Oil Company will 
be held at the office of the company, 1122 Guerro 
street, San Francisco, on Wednesday, November 
12, 1902, at 7 o'clock, p. M., for the purpose of 
electing a board of directors for the ensuing 
year and for the transaction of such other busi- 
ness, as may arise. F. R. TURTON, 
Secretary. 




FOR 



Packing 

Oil and Gas 
Wells. 



The Most Successful, 
Durable and Cheapest 
Packer on the Market. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Wall Packer. Bottom Hole. 



Larkln & Co., 

BUTLER, PA. 



Opinion on Oil Ter- 
ritory and Proper 
Location given be- 
fore Drilling. Ad- 
vice on Value of 
Stock, Oil Lands 
and Prospects . . . 



Prices Reasonable 
Best of References 



W. E. YOULE 

CONTRACTOR and 
OIL EXPERT : : 

ARBUCKLE, 

Colusa County, 

California. 

nrjo 

CALIFORNIA COLORADO 
UTAH 



Standard Rigs Fur- 
nished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. 
Contract Drilling 
for Oil 



Twenty-five Years 
Experience in Cali- 
fornia Fields . . . . 



r/\ClfiC Oil. KKhUKTh* 



OIL FOR HAWAII. 



The Mataon Navigation Com- 
pany Loada the Marlon Chljcoot. 

Another large enterprise is to 
be established on the Alameda 
side ot the estuary. The Maison 
Navigation company has leased a 
dock from the Southern Pacific 
company near the shipyards and 
will erect a complete oil-loading 
plant on the property. The oil is 
to be shipped to Hawaii alfd other 
points. A vessel is being loaded 
with crude oil direct Irom the 
tank. Through a ten-inch pipe 
the oil is being forced into the 
hold. The plan Is a new one, 
says the Alameda Encinal, and 
by means of it a vessel carrying 
i5,coo to 20,000 barrels of oil can 
be loaded within a day. The 
three-masted brigantine Marion 
Chilcoot, the vessel into which 
the oil is being run, is owned by 
the Matson Navigation company, 
Captain A. P. Nelson command- 
ing. Attached to the vessel is a 
ten-inch canvas hose. This curves 
over the side of the boat and con- 
nects with the steel pipe leading 
to the tank. The pipe is so ar- 
ranged that it can either be at- 
tached to the tank or to oil cars. 
The vessel h<s capacity of 18,000 
barrels. 

The Marion Chilcoot was for- 
merly a sugar boat. She was only 
recently transformed into an oil 
carrier. The hull of the vessel 
is divided into twelve oil tanks 
and two cofferdams. Each tank is 
made of steel, and so separated 
from every other tanfc that, should 
the oil get afire in one compart- 
ment, it would not affect the oil in 
the other tanks The oil, which 
is a high grade of crude oil from 
Kern county, will be taken to 
Honolulu to be used as fuel. 



face dries quickly. Roads that 
are traveled much are packed 
smooth and hard, and the rain 
seen x to be an immediate benefit. 
Altogether it may be said that 
the oiled street is satisfactory in 
all kinds of weather. It is dust- 
less on dry or windy days and 
mudles-s on rainy days. The city 
will be justified in oiling other 
streets. 

Great Gas Well. 
The greatest gas well ever struck 
in Pennsylvania is now sending 
into the air more than 20,000 cu- 
I bic feet of gas every twenty-four 
: hours. It is defying all efforts to 
[bring it under control. The well 
is on the Peter Kerr farm, a short 
distance south of Worthington. 
The gas escaping, it is estimated, 
would supply a city of 10,000 in- 
habitants. In the eleven days that 
have elapsed si> ce the sand was 
struck more than 220.000,000 cu- 
bic feet of gas it is believed, have 
gone to waste. 



Opportunities in a Lifetime A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. t. 

219 Crocker Building 



SPINDLETOP. 



Facts and Figures About the 
Beaumont Field. 

The United States Geological 
Survey says that only 280 Spindle- 
top wells show a yield of oil suffi- 
cient to be considered of com- 
mercial importance. The oil is 
unsuited for the production of 
illuminating; oil, and it is doubt- 
ful if it can be made to yield a 
good lubricating oil. Whether it 
can be successfully used in metal- 
lurgical processes is unsettled. Its 
value for asphalt and as a gas oil 
is undetermined. 

The average maximum flow of 
162 wells is from 10,000 to 12,000 
barrels daily. 

The value of well material, 
tanks, tank cars, pipe-lines, etc.. 
is $7,640,000. 

From January 1, 1901 to May 1, 
1902, the total production was 
11,688 000. 

On May t, 1902, there were 52 
abandoned wells, 240 producing 
wells, and 60 wells drilling. 



For Oiled Roads. 

Another point in favor of oiled 
roads is demonstrated by the 
rains. A contrast is afforded in 
several parts of Santa Barbara 
and in every case the oiled road 
is in better condition during and 
after the rain than the road that 
has not been oiled. The water 
does not penetrate so deeply, the 
roadbed is not cut, and the sur- 



Over 2,000. 

The oil companies, good, bad 
and indifferent, incorporated in 
the United States during the pres- 
ent year will probably number 
over 2,000. 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters * 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Us<; Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smilh 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Association uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smilh 
Premiers. 

De-criptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge. 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
10 Montfcemery St. San Francisco 

Branch Stores: 
Spokane, t,os Angeles and Portland. 



Headquarters Sciool, Govcnaeit and 
Oil Lands in California. 

School land* may he taken f> 'acre* 

LaoO* at>ouod in Nil coumtts in State They ic- 

• juire no cunoition' at to residence on land or 

lion, and carrv nil minerals i.ti.1 tlepotHa. 

• inly |i Jjanictr. F«iv ta ■> hnve 
been made in all the California oil dlMru tv Now 
U fOW Dpi rtiitnn -., ' ' :«nd* itr adapted to 
Farming. Ratchmfi. rtmbcf l.anda ant! arc the 
"■fe»t and Cheapest Speculation m Hie Ontted 

-lump for Land Book and Cin 
Pine pfu\en oil lands to offer. Correspondence 
aollcileu F.fttahhshed 1885. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



If You are going Hast call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, or Dollar lor 

Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 
B. O. MCCORMICK. T. H. GOODMAN, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United States and 

aiiB^a— ■■■■■•— Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



/ 1YGNET PBTROLKUM CO 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. I* Fair, president, BliUW Pax- 
ton, vice-pres? Jent, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McEIroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Farrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
ft2.850.ooo; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summertand fields, 
with 30 producing wells. Officers and directors' 
P V Schermerborn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
cipal office. Potomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital $500,000 

Treasury stock $300,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley 

Leased 6000 acres asphaltum land in Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Falkenberg, president; M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawson, R P Chase, Col E J 
Ensign. 

Ofhces: 475-76 Parrott Building, 853 Market 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



A. ZELLERBACI. & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

41b, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the LArgen stock. Our price* are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main, 1188. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 



San Francisco, Cal 



The Star Drilling Machine 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests range from shallow water wells to a Hurt of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 

1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes In one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

'"" The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used In every State and Terri 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds et- 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

Deaoriptive catalogue mailed free. AKRON. OHIO. 




PACTFrC OIL, REPORTEk 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GHt=Edged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coallnga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

ACRES MO ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. • 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected. Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 



Stock Nonassessable. 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 




LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. IO 



AGENCIES 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon . | Seattle, Washington 

B. R, ELDREDGE, Sales Agent o. D. COLVIN, Sales Agent 



American Steel & Wire Co, 



CHICAGO NEW YORK WORCESTER DENVER SAN FRANCISCO 

Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 

American Steel Wire Pumping Line 

American Steel Wire Tubing Line 

American Steel Wire Sand L'ne 
Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 



GEO. H. ISMON 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE 

8 AND 10 PINE STREET 

FACTORY 

16th and Folsom Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO, California 




CMS. C. MOORE & CO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



ww ft ^UniKAWlUKOrUK 

rMineers complete power plants 

****^*** VV* ** Machinery of the Highest Grade 




Geipel Steam Traps 

Always Closed when Steam 

is in the Brass Pipe. Always 

Open when Water is in the 

Brass Pipe. 

Guaranteed Positive in its 

Action. 




Main Office 

San Francisco, Cal. 

32 First Street 



Branch Offices 
NEW YORK 1303 Havemeyer Bldfe 
LOS ANGELES 103 S. Broadway 
SEATTLE 218 Second Ave. So 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., NOVEMBER 14, 1902. 



Price 10 Cents. 



OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 

PITTSB U R G H , PA, 

MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING REQUIRBD 

To Drill, Equip and Operate OIL, GAS and WATER WELLS 
BOILERS, ENGINES, DRILLING and FISHING TOOLS 
MANILA & WIRE ROPE, CASING* TUBING, DRIVE & LINE PIPE 

COMBINATION OUTFITS 

INTERCHANGEABLE FROM STANDARD CABLE DRILLING TO THE 
HYDRAULIC ROTARY SYSTEM, SHIFT MADE IN A FEW MOMENTS 
FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER. 

CABLE SYSTEM FOR HARD ROCK FORMATIONS, HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
FOR QUICKSAND 5» CLAY, COMBINATION OUTFITS for any condition. 



/ 





IMPERIAL WORKS, Oil City, Pa., one of the OIL WELL SUPPLY CO.'S numerous ManTg Plants. 



THE COLUMBIA STEEL DRILLER. 



THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




|| BOSTON CASING 



<£> LINE PIPE 



<b> DRIVE PIPE 




b> TUBING 

As Manufactured by the 

NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through* 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., FRIDAY HER 14, 1902. 



Prick, Tkn \ hnts. 



SUNSET AND MIDWAY FIELDS. 



Great Opportunities Presented in These 
Fields for the Judicious Invest- 
ment of Capital. 



The Early Construction of a Railroad to the Coast 

Assures Abundant Transportation Facilities — 

Strong Companies Organized for Active 

Development Work. 



The Occidental Oil company 
was incorporated on May 1, 1900, 
under the laws of West Virginia, 
incorporrted under these liws in 



will assuredly enter rich, produc- 
ing oil sand at no exceedingly great 
depth, the average well in these 
districts being in the neighbor- 



proved to be a good producer, the 
oil gushing over the pipe at the 
rate of 500 barrels a day on the 
start, the oil being collected in 
hastily constructed earthern reser- 
voirs. This flow continued un- 
interruptedly until the well be- 
came clogged with sand from the 
gas pressure from below wblcb 
forced the sand up the pipe, thus 
obstructing the flow of oil. This 
was fortunate as on account of 
the lack of transportation facili- 
ties the marketing of the oil from 
the point where the well was lo- 
cated would have been impossible 
or at least very expensive. This 
well was located in Sunset district 
in section 2, township 12, range 
24. 

The second well of the Occi- 



Abovit a month ago the pres- 
sure of gas was su trong that the 
well "broke loose, the oil being 
forced up on the outside of the 
casing, making its control a matter 
of great difficulty, but piO' 
better than could be proved in 
any other way the immensity of 
the subterranean oil depc sit exist- 
ing below. 

Having proved beyond doubt 
the tidiness of its holdings, and 
having an acreage so vast that no 
company could develop it in a 
century, the Occidental Oil com- 
pany proceeded to set in motion a 
plan for the organization of a 
number of sub-companies, which, 
separately or collectively, might 
in the future develop this acreage 
and place the product advanta- 
geously upon the market. 

During the last year and a half 




Flowing 

order to make the stock absolutely 
non-assessable. 

On its incorporation the com- 
pany had a very large acreage of 
land in Sunset, Midway and Mc- 
Kittrick districts, and since that 
time has secured much more; so 
at present the company has about 
11,000 acres of exceedingly valu- 
able land, much of which is al- 
ready proven, and of the re- 
mainder all or nearly all is regarded 
to bi good land, In which the drill 



Well No. 2 of the Occidental Oil 
hood of 1,000 feet. Many of the 
most productive of these wells 
have reached the oil sand at from 
700 to 800 feet. 

Having secured its land, and 
become incorporated, and having 
sold a sufficient number of shares 
the company proceeded to prove 
its land which at that time was 
out of the proven oil belt. 

The first well was completed 
about December 1, 1900, at a 
depth of about 800 feet, and 



Company, in Sunset Oil District, C 
dental company was located not 
far from well No. 1, and was com- 
pleted in the early spring of 1901, 
at about the same depth. This 
well proved to be superior to well 
No. 1, there being even a heavier 
flow of oil. The half-tone picture 
on this page shows the oil flowing 
naturally from this well In a 
steady stream, which flowed con- 
tinuously until the well was with 
difficulty capped, ?iid placed un- 
der control. 



ALIFORNIA. 

a number of oil companies have 
been incorporated, and located on 
the land originally obtained by 
the Occidental. Among these can 
be mentioned the Inter Nos and 
the Occidental El Rey, both of 
which have wells equal to those of 
the parent company. 

Tne latest sub-company of the 
Occidental is the Elk Horn Con- 
solidated Oil company, organized 
on February 26, 1902, under the 
laws of Arizona, which makes the 
stock non-assessable. The com- 
pany is capitalized for $2,500,000, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



with shares at $i each. The offi- 
cers are well-known and highly 
respected as California business 
and professional men, and who 
have made successes of the various 
enterprises they have undertaken 
and represent. They are J. G. 
Jury, President; H. B. Worcester, 
Secretary and Treasurer; J. M. 
Botts, C. H. Wicks, L. E. Gobel, 
A. Salyer, Dr. W. W. East.nan, 
Directors. 

The land held by this company, 
comprising 1,400 acres, is not lo- 
cated in one solid body, but con- 
sists of a dozen or more pieces, 
carefully selected from the hold- 
ings of the Occidental, and lo- 
lated, all of them, in what is be- 
lieved to be the oil belt, which has 
been proved to run in an unbroken 
line from Sunset on the southeast 
to McKittrick on the northwest, 
and comprises lands in Sunset, 
Midway, and McKittrick. Much 
of this land is already proven by 
the wells of other companies lo- 
cated in adjoining sections, and 
the Elk Horn company itself has 
already one well which has just 
entered the oil sand. This well, 
the first of the Elk Horn's wells, 
is located in section 25, and will 
prove to be the equal of any well 
in the Sunset district, 

At present the lack of trans- 
portation facilities is the only 
drawback to this district. But it 
is absolutely certain that before 
the close of 1903 a railroad, and 
perhaps a pipe-line also, will be 
completed from the district west- 
ward to the coast at San Luis 
Obispo county. The line of the 
road is already surveyed. Con- 
tracts for oil amounting to over 
5,000 barrels a day have been 
made by the producers with the 
railroad company, and it is con- 
fidently asserted that in the early 
spring actual construction will 
commence. Soma of the most in- 
fluential, wealthy, and exper- 
ienced railroad men in the State, 
notably E, P. Vining, are the main 
promoters of this rdilroad enter- 
prise, which insures its successful 
and early completion. The dis- 
tance from Bakersfield to the 
coast is only 140 miles, and from 
Sunset only 100 miles. 

On one account the lack of trans- 
portation facilities in Sunset has 
been and is an advantage especial- 
ly to investors. 

The minute that actual con- 
struction work on the new road 
commences, and transportation fa- 
cilities and an oil market are as- 
sured, then the stocks of success- 
ful companies in this field will be 
in demand, and present prices will 
increase very rapidly. This field 
is the equal in every respeet, and 
is superior in many respects to the 
Kern River field. In another year 
the demand for oil wijl be almost 
double what it is at present, and 
the price of oil will increase pro- 
portionately. It is to the Sunset 
field that consumers will largely 
look for the supply to meet the 
increased demand for oil, and pro- 
ducing companies will be in a po- 
sition from the start to sell oil at 
a profit, which will enable them to 
declare satisfactory dividends to 
stockholders. 

It is on this account that the 
Sunset and Midway fields to-day 
are regarded as presenting excep- 
tionable opportunities for judi- 
cious and profitable investment. 



AN OIL LAW-SUIT. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



The I ten Nos Oil Company the 
Defendants in the Case. 

In the case of Herman Thomp- 
son vs. the Inter Nos Oil and De- 
velopment company, James Wil- 
son and John Doe, a petition for a 
change of venue to San Francisco 
has been filed by the defendants. 
The Californian says: The case is 
one wherein the plaintiff sued to 
recover wages alleged to be due 
him for drilling and work per- 
formed on the company's property. 
The defendants ask that the case 
be transferred to San Francisco 
upon the ground that the office of 
the Inter Nos Oil and Develop- 
ment company is in San Francisco, 
and all its books and records, 
which are necessary evidence in 
the case, are there; that the resi- 
dence of the defendant, James A. 
Wilson, is also in San Francisco- 
and that the testimony of several 
residents of San Francisco is neces- 
sary for the proper trial of the 
case. 

The Inter Nos company has 
also filed an answer denying that 
it is indebted to the plaintiff for 
any sum, and alleging that the 
latter performed his work in so 
unskillful a manner as to cause 
the loss of some $900 worth of 
tools, for which loss it has been 
sued by the Bishop Fishing Tool 
company, the ruin of its well, 
which had to be abandoned in 
consequence. It alleges that the 
plaintiff has caused a loss of $2,000, 
and asks for damages in the sum 
of $5,202, the actual loss in tools, 
time and material provided It is 
possible to clear the well and make 
use of it. 

The defendant, James A. Wil- 
son, has filed an answer in which 
he claims a chattel mortgage on 
all the property of the Inter Nos 
company, and asks that any judg- 
ment rendered against said com- 
pany be subject to his rights in 
the premises. 

BIG PU MPING P LANTS. 

Irrigation of Dixon Alfalfa Lands 
Conducted on a Large Scale. 
The completion of the irrigation 
plants of J. R. Bloom and Jas. Mil- 
lar recently permits Dixon to 
boast of two more of the largest 
pumping plants in a large section 
of the State. The new plant on 
the Bloom place has a capacity of 
1,800 gallons of water a minute, 
and the water is supplied by a 
10-inch bored well. Mr. Bloom's 
plant is composed of a 30-horse 
power gasoline engine and a 6-inch 
centrifugal pump. The plant will 
irrigate 60 acres of alfalfa. Mr. 
Bloom has prepared an extensive 
portion of the 60 acres he pro- 
poses to irrigate, and will have 
the remainder ready for next sea- 
son. Alfalfa yields abundantly 
under the process of irrigation, 
and promises to be one of the com- 
ing industries of this section. 

Jas. Millar's plant is located on 
his place seven miles southeast of 
Dixon, and is made up of a 25-horse 
power gasoline engine and a 5- 
inch pump, each of which is of 
the same type used in the Bloom 
plant. Mr. Millar's is also bored. 
The well was sunk in the bottom 
of one of the dry sloughs which 
traverse this portion of the coun- 
try and is a phenomenal water 
producer. Including the depth of 
the slough the well is but 34 feet 
deep, and the greatest capacity of 
the pump, 1,200 gallons a minute, 



fails to reduce the standing water- 
mark in the well more than three 
feet. Mr. Millar will irrigate a 
large area of alfalfa land also. 

There are few people who rea- 
lize the immense amount of water 
a 5 or 6-inch centrifugal pump will 
throw. The quantity may be bet- 
ter understood when it is said that 
the stream which flows from the 
Bloom plant is four inches deep 
and fourteen inches wide. — Dixon 
Tribune. 

The R. H. Herron Co. 

Great increase in the business 
of the San Francisco branch of 
the R. H. Herron company, dealers 
in oil well supplies, has neces- 
sitated the removal of the office of 
this firm from 411 Market street to 
509 Mission street, near First 
street, where much larger quarters 
than those occupied before en- 
ables Manager W. W. Nellis to 
handle much more expeditiously 
and satisfactorily the large busi- 
ness of the firm. Increasing ac- 
tivity in development work in 



northern and central California 
has marked the opening of the 
fall and winter season, and is due 
largely to the increasing demand 
for oil and the increase in its 
prices. 



Wanted 

5,000 burners by a California 
refinery for a. superior grade of 
stove distillate. Submit proposi- 
tions to P. O. Box 427, Bakers- 
field, Cal. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irii- 
gatio", Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds underwritten . 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter Cables==best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7^6-in., 5^-in. and 
4j|-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



100 Acres M *" *y «■ ■ «-*» 



San Mateo Co., Cal. 



On most favorable terms. Would also lease first-class Standard Rig 
to responsible company. 

THIS TRACT IS IN THE HEART OF THB FIELD 

Address chas. F. O'Brien, 

420 California Street Telephone B US h ess San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ENCOURAGING REPORT. 



Development Work Progressing at Summer- 
land and Carpinteria. 



Operations of the Crescent and Columbian Oil and 
Asphalt Company in Developing Oil and As- 
phalt—The New Refinery Completed. 



In a letter just received Mr. C. 
YV. Ayers, president of the Cres- 
cent and Columbian companies 
operating at Simimerlaud and 
Carpinteria, in Santa Barbara 
county, gives the following en- 
couraging account of operations 
in this promising held : 

In regard to our work will say 
that we are progressing very nice- 
ly. Our Crescent well on Ortega 
Hill is down 650 feet, with a 13^- 
inch hole. Cased out all surface 
water and annoyances at 574 feet, 
and are now drilling in firm blue 
oil shale. Much oil shows in the 
drillings, and the sand stratum 
just passed through would yield 
about the same amount of oil as 
the shallow wells of the field. We 
expect to go into the second sand 
stratum within the next 100 feet. 
These points are noted in the log 
of the well, so that pipe can be 
perforated and the oil let in when 
the well is completed. Our object 
being to get the deepest strata, we 
do not stop at the first or second 
sands. 

Our driller, Mr. J. B. Cook, is the 
most expert and painstaking ever 
in this territory, and it is to his skill 
and care that we owe our success 
in getting down 650 feet of 13%- 
inch hole successfully, a thing 
never before accomplished in this 
field. He encountered all the 
usual obstacles and hindrances in 
the way of boulders, heaving and 
quicksands and slippery sliding 
shale. It is these things that 
heretofore caused drillers to get 
their hole to a point at depths of 
300 and 400 feet. We are now 
prepared to go down successfully 
a distance of 2,000 feet, it neces- 
sary, to get the heavy deposits that 
all oil men believe will be reached 
within that distance from surface. 

No better indications were ever 
encountered in any well, than are 
showing now. 

At the rate hole is now being 
made we will be down 1,000 feet 
before Christmas. 

The price of oil has suddenly 
advanced 10 cents per barrel in 
this field, and another raise of as 
much more is predicted before 
January 1, 1903. 

At Carpinteria, the Columbian 
Oil, Asphalt and Refining com- 



pany is doing some extensive 
work. 

Its well No. 2, on Higgins 
land, is down 1,200 feet, and mak- 
ing so much gas, that steam pipes 
were laid from the boiler to ex- 
tinguish fire in case of accident. 
It was predicted that a heavy 
body of liquid asphaltum would 
be encountered at about this 
depth, and the gas flow, together 
with a gteat amount of oil show- 
ing in the drillings, makes it look 
as if it was within a few feet of 
the drill now. A string of eight- 
inch drive pipe is now being put 
in, to insure a deep hole if neces- 
sary. 

At the refinery, all is in readi- 
ness for business as soon as the 
barrel stock arrives to receive the 
product. Stock tanks are full of 
oil and more tanks being con- 
structed in readiness for output of 
well No. 2 as soon as brought in. 

Fires were put under the boiler, 
and preliminary tests made last 
week. As usual in new work 
some few alterations were found 
necessary, and these were done at 
once. This is one of the finest 
arranged and most complete re- 
fining plants of its capacity on the 
coast. Very truly yours, 

C. W. Aybrs. 



GOVERNMENT REPORT, 



Favorable Opinion of Our Oil 
Fields by Government Experts. 

The annual report of the Qnited 
States Geological Survey, of the 
mineral resources of California, 
just issued, has the following in 
regard to our oil resources: 

The production of California in 
1901 was 8,786,330 barrels, as com- 
pared with 4,324,484 barrels in 
T900. 

The State made a remarkable 
increase in its output of crude pe- 
troleum in the past year, a very 
large per centage of which came 
from the recently developed pools 
in Kern County. 

The petroleum produced in this 
county, as well as a great propor- 
tion of that produed in the other 
counties of southern California, is 
eminently a fuel petroleum. As 
such, it is peculiarly acceptable, 
owing to there being no readily 



accessible deposits of coal of com- 
mercial value in the State or in 
the near-by States. 

The cheapness of fuel has a di- 
rect bearing on the commercial 
supremacy ot every State or coun- 
try, as it is the direct source of 
light, heat and power. The im- 
portation of coal from British Co- 
lumbia, Australia, England, Wales 
and Japan, and from the State 
of Washington into California, 
amounting to nearly 2,000,000 
tons annually, at an outlay of 
not less than $12,000,000, must 
greatly decrease In the future. 
Especially does this seem true as 
the facilities for delivery ol 
petroleum by the pipe-line now 
under construction from the Kern 
field to San Francisco, will place 
this valuible liquid fuel at tide 
water with a guaranteed supply 
at such prices as will enable this 
locality to become a manufacturing 
center. 

The railroads of this State have 
been particularly benefited by the 
use of this liquid fuel in their loco- 
motives, for which it is admirably 



[adapted, and are at present tl: 
largest consumers. 

Tests linve proved that one 
pound of California petroleum 
used on a passenger locomotive 
evaporated 10.96 pounds of water 
from and 

with 7.14 pounds of water nuclei 
like 11s evaporated by 

one pound of Comax bituminous 
coal, or four barrels of oil did the 
work of one to 

rather below the results attained 
by other tests, which in many 
cases showed that from;, 1 ., to 
barrels of petroleum did the work 
of one ton of coal. 

To Whom It May Concern. 

Boulder, Colo., Oct. 0, T902. 
This is to certify that O. II Jones, the 
oil locator of Los Angeles, CrI., locnteil 
a well for the Otero Oil ami Gas com- 
pany in the Boulder, Colo., oil 6elds in 
May, 1902; that the same was drilled in- 
to oil September 1, at a depth of 1,765 
feet; that since September 3 wc have 
been pumping 100 barrels per day. This 
was not near any other producing well. 
F. J. CRETCHKR, Director. 



GOLD! 

Never Goes Begging 

It is always at par. You don't have to seek a market or 
discount your goods. You are not subject to the dictation 
or control of the trusts. Fort hese and many other reasons 
a good gold property is one of the best investments, and 
stock in a company having a gold property of proven 
merit, managed by men of honesty and mining ability, 
offers to the poor man one of the best avenues to 
Independence. Such a proposition is the 

Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owning the Hudson group of mines in the Big Bug Dis- 
trict-. Arizona. surronnHpH hv rirh ^ — ^ — _ -. — 



10 



trict, Arizona, surrounded by rich 
producing mines. To continue 
development a block of treasury 
stock Is now being sold at 

Send for particulars. 



W. G. YOUNG & CO., 



CENTS 

PER. SHARE 

Par Value |i. 00 
Full Paid, 
Non-Asaessable. 



Fiscal 
Agents 



628-630 Laughlin BIdg. 
BANK INFERENCES Los Angeles, Cal. 






The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



F I T L E FT S 1 Oil Well Supply Co/s 



DRILLING 

CABLES 



it/ 
ifc 



Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



B. H. HERRON CO. 

411 Market St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



6 - -- - - 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast, 
[indorsed By the California Petroleum 
, Miners' Association. 

W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and editorial rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $250 

Six Months l 5° 

Three Months , 1 00 

s ingle Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Monet should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Regi stered Letter, addressedto Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-31.33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal., 
as second-class matter. 

FRIDAY.. NOVEMBER 14,1902 



PACIFIC OlL REPORTER 



The present presents greater op- 
portunities for 
Chances for profitable invest- 
Investment ment in the oil 
industry of Cali- 
fornia than ever before. 

While the oil industry is to-day 
four years old, it is yet in its in- 
fancy. It is just old enough and 
strong enough to begin to take 
rapid and lengthy strides. 

Two years ago we consumed less 
than five million barrels of crude 
oil. Last year the consumption 
reached eight and a half millions. 
This year it will reach twelve and 
a half millions. Next year it will 
reach twenty millions. What the 
consumption will be four years 
hence we do not dare estimate. 
Many assert it will not be less 
than forty million barrels annually. 

Where wi'l all this oil come 
from ? 

The fields now supplying con- 
sumers will soon be taxed to the 
utmost, and it will be to the new 
fields, as yet unreached by trans- 
portation facilities, that consumers 
will eventually be obliged to rely 
upon. 

It is these new fields that to-day 
present magnificent opportunities 
for profitable investment. Land 
that to-day is miles from a railroad or 
a pipe-line, and which can be pur 
chasedfor a song, contains millions 
of barrels of oil in its subterranean 
reservoirs. This land in a few 
years will be worth hundreds if not 
thousands of dollars an acre. Just 
as to-day some men are million- 
aires who five years ago were 
worth nothing, so five years hence 
men who to-day have nothing ex- 
cept desert land worth $2.50 an 
acre will themselves possess great 
wealth. 

The stocks of oil companies 
which control thousands of acres 
of this desert land can be bought 
for a song, This stock will be 
worth some day, if the company is 
rightly managed, ten, yes, twenty 



times what it is worth to-day, and 
those who buy a few hundred dol- 
lars' worth of stock will find they 
have made an investment which 
has made them independent for 
life. Probably, for a year or two, 
perhaps longer, there will be no 
financial returns, either in divi- 
dends or in increase of the worth 
of the stock, but the result will 
surely exemplify the truth of the 
adage that " Patience has its own 
reward." 

Opportunities are presented to- 
day that should not be allowed to 
slip. Midway, Sunset, Coalinga, 
Half Moon Bay — these and other 
districts are to-day practically new 
and undeveloped fields. Wait 
awhile and see what these districts 
will do in a few years in the way 
of supplying the market with fuel 
and refining oil. 

It is these and districts like 
them that present chances for in- 
vestment to those who can afford 
to expend a few hundred or thou- 
sand dollars, and await the out- 



great saving in labor occurs in the stoke- 
hole, where three furnace tenders are 
able to do the work of a dozen coal stok- 
ers, with about one-tenth the effort and 
an incomparable degree of comfort and 
cleanliness. The economy of fuel-oil 
consumption is further exemplified in 
the reduced cost of steam production 
and bunker area for fuel storage and in 
an increased area in the ship's hold for 
cargo carrying. All of these factors en- 
ter into the problem of the earning capa- 
city of steam vessels, which is, after all, 
the chief consideration with their own- 
ers. — S. F. Chronicle. 



come. 



Fuel Oil on Atlantic Liners. 

Crude oil has nt last been introduced 
on the Atlantic liners as fuel for steam 
generation instead of coal. On her last 
voyage from Antwerp to New York the 
Red Star liner Kensington was equipped 
with fuel oil-burners in her boiler fur- 
naces, and she made the trip across the 
Atlantic successfully in ten days. Her 
chief engineer reports that the test was 
satisfactory. 

If the Kensington's furnaces are prop- 
erly equipped, and it is to be presumed 
that they are, the use of coal as a fuel 
on her will be permanently abandoned. 
The great saving in the fuel bill and the 
increased cargo space which the burn- 
ing of crude petroleum instead of coal 
permits aie advantages which the man- 
agers and stockholders of all Atlantic 
liners will not be slow in detecting. 

A large number of freight steamships 
operated on the Atlantic have been using 
fuel oil for steam generation with per- 
fect success for a long time. It is sur- 
prising that the passenger steamships 
have been so backward in imitating their 
example. Now that one of them has used 
it with success, others will probably fol- 
low. The greyhounds of the Atlantic 
are enormous coal consumers, and a great 
army of coal-passers and stokers is em- 
ployed on each one of them under con- 
ditions of extreme physical discomfort. 
The adoption of oil-burners in the fur- 
naces of the Mariposa and other steam- 
ships sailing from this port proved that 
the use of liquid fuel results in a great 
economy of labor, while it increases im- 
mensely the comfort of the men em- 
ployed in the stoke hole. These are con- 
siderations of considerable importance in 
the operations of all steam vessels. — S. 
F. Chronicle. 



Fuel Oil in Steam Vessels. 

A British tank steamer and oil-carrier 
and oil-burner has made a record voyage 
from Batoum, on the Black Sea, to Syd- 
ney, New South Wales. Three advan- 
tantages in the working of the vessel 
were obtained as a result of the voyage. 
She burned daily one-third less weight 
of oil than she was previously accus- 
tomed to burn of coal for the production 
of steam, made better speed by one-half 
a knot an hour and carried only two- 
thirds her former crew. 

The experiences of this tank steamer 
correspond with those of the steam ves- 
sels supplied with fuel-burning furnaces 
which are employed on this coast. The 



Oil and Gas Patents. 

The following recent patents re- 
lating to oil and gas and their pro- 
duction are reported expressly for 
the Pacific Oii, Reporter by J. 
M. Nesbit, patent attorney, Park 
building, Pittsburg, Pa., from 
whom printed copies may be pro- 
cured for 15 cents each: 

Machine or engine oiler, G. J. 
Kraushaar, Cleveland, Ohio; No. 
711,114. 

Tool for withdrawing casing 
from wells, Samue Bennison, Gal- 
veston, Texas; No. 711,378. 

Drill for oil or other wells, W. 
E. Johnston, Conoquessing, Pa.; 
No. 711,506. 

Steam boiler, R. M. Downie and 
D. A. Messner, Beaver Falls, Pa., 
assignors to the Keystone Driller 
company, same place; No. 711,- 

557- 

Pump for deep wells, A. J. 
Webster, M. W. Hall and W. E. 
Stadler, Bakersfield, Cal.; No. 
711,804. 

Adjustable grip elevator for 
casing or tubing, C. L, Smith, Oil 
City, Pa., assignor to Oil Well 
Supply company, Pittsburg, Pa.; 
No. 711,911. 

Hydrocarbon burner, F. L. Car- 
ter, Dorsey, Md.; No. 711,936. 

Hydrocarbon burner, C. R. 
Kittle and G. E. Harpham, Los 
Angeles, Cal.; No. 712,142. 

Power mechanism for pumping 
wells, J. J. Kwis, Findlay, O., as- 
signor to Adams brothers com- 
pany, same place; No. 712,314. 

Sand reel, Andrew Benson, 
Bradford, Pa.; No. 712,480. 

Antifriction devices for sucker 
reds, W. L. Black, Fort McKavett, 
Texas; Nos. 712,486, 712,487 and 
712,488. 

Drill for boring wells, A. C. 
Shuster, Bakersfield, Cal; No. 
712.734. 

Hydrocarbon burner, D. C. Wil- 
gus, San Francisco, Cal.; No. 712,- 
879. 

Antrifriction device for sucker 
rods and couplings, W. L- Black, 
Fort McKavett, Texas; No. 712,- 
901. 



Associated Bonds. 

The Union Trust company of 
San Francisco has been made 
trustee in an issue of the Asso- 
ciated Oil cempany's bonds for 
$5,000,000. There ure 5,too of 
these bonds of the value of $1,000 
par each. They run for twenty 
years, and interest at the rate of 
5 percent, payable in semi-annual 
coupons. It is probable that an 
attempt will be, made to issue $2,- 
500,000 of these bonds at once in 
order to pay for oil properties pur- 
chased by the Associated. 

While the Union Trust company 
is made trustee, this does not mean 
that the Union Trust company 
guarantees the worth of the bonds 
or the payment of principal and 
interest. 

It is rumored darkly that the 
Associated is trying to raise $20,- 
000,000 for two pipe-lines, storage 
facilities, refineries, tank steamers, 
and the purchase of a great quan- 
tity of new territory in the Coal- 
inga and other districts. 



Oil Delegates- 

The annual meeting or conven- 
tion of the California Miners' As- 
sociation will be held during the 
first three days of the coming 
weeks in this city. The following 
will be the delegates from the 
California Petroleum Miners' As- 
sociation: Hon. M. H. DeYoung, 
Arthur R. Briggs, G. X. Wendling, 
Geo. H. Ismon, Prof. E. P. Heald, 
E. A. Denicke, Dr. C. T. Deane, 
W. B. Winn. A paper on the 
" Oil Industry of California from 
a Commercial Standpoint" will be. 
read by Secretary Dr. C. T. Deane, 
representing the oil men. Other 
valuable papers and essays will 
be read. 



Alert May Burn Oil. 

It is reported that the revenue 
cutter Alert, now at Mare Island, 
will be fitted with oil-burning ap- 
paratus as an experiment, as the 
result of the recent favorable rer 
port made to the Government by 
Lieutenant Wenchell, who not 
only witnessed the experiments 
made on the steamer Mariposa, 
but made a trip in that vessel to 
Tahiti. The Alert will be the first 
of the Government vessels on this 
coast to discard coal for oil. 



Crude Oil for Hawaii. 

The ship Marion Chilcott sailed 
last Friday for Honolulu with 714,- 
000 gallons of crude oil, valued at 
at $22,100, as its cargo. The ves- 
sel also caried 17 drums distillate, 
valued at $207, destined to the 
same port. 



Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 



MAY BE HAD AS FOLLOWS! 

Prom Nov. i, 1899, to Nov. l, 1900 $6.00 

From Nov. I, 1900, to Nov. 1, 1901 6.00 

From Nov. I, 1901, to Nov. I, 1902 5,00 



These volumes are strongly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
oil industrv on the Pacific coast. 



Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries in the Far West. 



COLUSA. 

W. fi. Youle, who is drilling the 
Smith-Gorrill well, says the well 
is down i, 800 feet, with 5;- inch 
casing, the well at present being 
full of water. The amount of gas 
In the well is enormous, the gas 
pressure each day at intervals 
sending a column of water 150 
feet high. Work is now suspended, 
waiting the 5-inch . rive-pipe. 

FRESNO. 

They are now manufacturing 
gasoline, benzine. 52 distillate, ker- 
osene, stove distillate, neutral oils, 
green oils and all the different 
grades of asphalt, and they expect 
to be making several different 
grades of lubricating oils within 
the next three or four weeks. The 
question of cheap fuel is of vital 
importance to everyone in the San 
Joaquin valley, and it is to be 
hoped that the burners the com- 
pany is now trying will prove a 
success, as in that case the public 
will receive the benefit of distill- 
ate for fuel, which would be 
cheaper and much more conven- 
ient than wood or coal. 

After the misfortune of having 
two fires within one month, and 
the delays necessary to reconstruct 
the portionsburned, the oil refinery 
of the California Fresno company 
at Fresno, started last Friday to re- 
fining oil up to their extreme 



capacity of 150 barrels (crude) per 
day. There have been several 
changes made, President and Gen- 
eral Manager H. H. Hart taking 
the active management, while 
the relinining department is now 
in charge of E. A Edwards, 
a thorough refiner, he having been 
all the way through the business, 
handling both Ohio and California 
oils. Mr. Edwards' thirty years 
experience is shown in the syste- 
matic manner in which the oil is 
handled from the time it is unload- 
ed from the cars until it is ready 
for the market. 

KERN 

The case of C. A. Phelps vs the 
Kern Oil company hss been com- 
promised and settled out of court. 

Negotiations are in progress for 
the purchase of a 40-acre tract in 
Midway district, the consideration 
named being $200 per acre. 

The Californian says: The West- 
ern Union is soon to be sold at 
sheriff's sale. This company has 
the possessory right in 160 acres 
of land in the range of hills to 
the east of the Midway belt, and 
before it got into financial diffi- 
culties, it put down a hole 600 feet 
in depth, passing through one 
small stratum of oil sand and tap 
ping a gas pocket which yielded 
fuel with which to run the domes- 



■art of the enterprise. The 
prospects wire very flattering. 

The large gusher of the Monte 
Carlo Oil company, at Kern K. 
is again flowing. This well 
merly had a record of about one 
thousand barrels a day, but later 
began to subside and had to he 
pumped. It also began to yield 
considerable water, caused, it is 
said, by the v ell being dug too 
deep and the water entering from 
the bottom. This has now been 
stopped. Three measurements 
taken show now 350, 450 and 800 
barrels of oil respectively, all of 
the best quality. The stratum 
from which the oil comes has been 
proven intact. 

The last of the pipe for the San 
Krancisco McKittrick's line from 
its lease to the railroad at Olig is 
being laid, and very shortly the 
company will be in a position to 
deliver oil. It has made a con- 
tract at a fair price. The San 
Franrisco-McKittrick is located up 
the Gulch above the spot where 
the Giant drilled its immense 
wells. It has one good well, and 
another which has been partially 
spoiled in the making. A third 
was abandoned altogether. Of the 
two wells to be put on the pump, 
one is rated at twenty-five barrels 
and the other was worked for five 
days producing a gross average of 
350 barrels a day. 

Contracts are now being signed 
by most of the companies operat- 
ing here, agreeing to furnish the 
5,000 barrels of oil a day for ship- 
ment demanded by the Midland- 
Pacific railroad as a condition of 
building that line. H. W. McCray, 
agent of the company here, has 
received notice from thecompany's 



officers in San Francisco that ar- 
rangements have been made lor 
placing the necessary bonds for 
the construction of the line when- 
ever the requisite amount of oil 
shipments has been guaranteed. 
1 the delay has been due for 
the most part to the fact that many 
diiectorsol'cornrauiesarescattered 
and seldom nitet. Mr. McCray 
says he cousidt rs the railroad as- 
sured. There is, however, the con- 
dition attached that the satisfactory 
amou t cf freight must be gunr 
anteed. The claims of the pro- 
moters that 5,01.0 barrels of oil 
per day can be secured f c r ten 
years, must be made good. An 
agent of the capitalists w ho are to 
take the bonds will inspect the 
situation, and upon his report will 
depend the sale. The assurance 
is given that should he find that 
the requisite amount of freight 
has been awarded, the sale will 
take place. If he does not find 
that to be the case, no money will 
be forthcoming. That being the 
condition, it seems imr robable that 
those producers who have decided 
to sign the freight contracts, will 
no longer delay, but will rather 
hasten to close them up, in order 
that these money-lenders will have 
cocvincing proof that the road 
will pay from the start. 

ORANGE. 

Another new well was brought 
in last week by Brea Canyon Oil 
company. It is good for at least 
300 barrels daily. 

A new well on the Graham- 
Loftus lease is now down nearly 
2,200 feet. There are nearly forty 
tons of sl^-inch casing in this well. 

Sealed bids for furnishing Santa 
Ana with 10,000 barrels of fuel oil 



THE 



ELK HORN 
CONSOLIDATED 

OIL COMPANY 



J. G. JURY, President J. M. BOTTS, Vice-President 

H. B. WORCESTER, Secretary and Treasurer 



Capitalization, $2,500,000 1 Present Selling Price of 
Par Value of Shares, $1.00 f Stock = = = == 30 Cents 



Owns 1,400 Acres of Oil Land in Sunset, 
Midway and McKittrick Districts. 



Main Office, 470, 471 and 472 PARROTT BUILDING 



San Francisco, Cal. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for use at the waterworks in 1903 
were opened at a recent meeting 
of the city council, and the con- 
tract was awarded to the Central 
Oil company, the lowest bidder, 
at 72 yi. cents a barrel, delivered f. 
o. b. in Santa Ana. Bids were re- 
ceived from seven companies, and 
ranged from 72^ to to, cents a 
barrel. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

A fuel oil tank of well No. 13 
on the Western Union oil field 
caught fire last Friday evening 
and was completely destroyed. 
Fortunately there was but little 
oil in the tank at the time, and be- 
fore any serious damage could be 
done, the flames were put under 
control. How the fire originated 
is not known, it is presumed, how- 
ever, to have been due to the 
carelessness of an employee. 

SAN LOIS OBISPO. 

The San Luis Gas company have 
made many new improvements in 
and around the old gas plant. 
They are now putting in a large 
tank capable of holding several 
thousand of gallons of oil, along- 
side of the main building. The oil 
will be used for fuel in running the 
works. 

SAN MATEO. 

The development work is pro- 
gressing very satisfactorily in the 
Halfmoon Bay district. Some new 
discoveries of an important nature 
are reported just as this paper 
goes to press. Mr. Kerr, of the 
Wisconsin Oil company, which 
has a well down over 1.200 feet, 
does not deny that important and 
good news has been received, but 
refuses to state particulars. Every 



attempt is being made to secure 
leases on land. 



In Wyoming. 

The Ellis oil well, on section 22. 
near Spring Valley, Wyoming, 
owned by the Atlantic and Pa- 
cific Oil company of Wyoming 
and California, when put on the 
beam proved itself to be the great- 
est producer of any yet struck in 
Wyoming. Two 150-barrel tanks 
were filled during the first day, 
and when pumping ceased the oil 
stood 900 feet in the well. The 
oil is of a most superior quality, 
abounding largely in napththa 
and gasoline and other valuable 
products, being worth about $8 
per barrel in the crude state, just 
as it comes from the well. 



Alameda to Burn Oil. 

The steamer Alameda, Captain 
Harriman, has arrived from Hon- 
olulu, and is to be succeeded on 
the route by the Zealandia. The 
Alameda, after beingconvertedinto 
anoil-burner, will resume her place 
on the line. Such success has at- 
tended the Mariposa as an oil- 
burner that the Oceanic company 
has for some weeks been prepar- 
ing to place her sister-ship, the 
Alameda, in the same class. 



Steamer Nebraskan. 

The steamer Nebraskan, Cap- 
tain Delano, sailed on Monday on 
her first trip to Honolulu and 
Kahului. Since arriving from New 
York, a few weeks ago, the vessel 
has been converted into an oil- 
burner. 



SUITS FOR DAMAGES. 



The Southern Pacific Sued for 
Not Furnishing Tank Cars. 

Suits for damages for alleged 
failure to furnish tank cars for the 
tiansportation of fuel oil when re- 
quired are piling up against the 
Southern Pacific. Claims for lully 
jSi,ooo,ooo in these suits have al- 
ready been brought against the 
corporation by angry shippers in 
Texas and this week General 
Manager Julius Kruttschnitt was 
served with a notice that another 
case for $102,500 damages had 
been brought against the road. 

These suits come from oil com- 
panies in the Beaumont district of 
Texas. A part of the burden of 
the Texas complaints is discrim- 
ination in the matter of furnishing 
cars, the company being accused 
of favoring the large shippers at 
the expense of the small ones. 
This allegation the company's 
officials deny. They admit a 
shortage of tank cars owing to the 
remarkable increase in the busi- 
ness of shipping oil from the 
Beaumont fields and the delay of 
the car manufacturers in turning 
out orders. It appears, however, 
that agents of the company made 
contracts to ship large quantities 
of oil within a certain period. The 
company has not been able to ful- 
fill these contracts. 



Oppose Standard Oil. 

A special dispatch received at 
London from Calcutta says that 
the Indian government has re- 
fused the Standard Oil company 
permission to prospect in the oil 
fields of Burmah. 



Chanute, Kan., oil men are or- 
ganizing to build a big refinery 
there. Chanute has become one 
of the settled oil districts of Amer- 
ica. 



The Palestine-Beaumont Oil and 
Development company last month 
distributed something more than 
$ 16,000 in its first 5 percent divi- 
dend. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that buys the oil and pays $1.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes THE highest Grade gaso- 
line, BENZINE AND KEROSENE OF ANY REFINERY ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 



$89 buys 100 Shares in each of four companies, or 
400 shares full-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment. 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
337 percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 450 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
qoo,ooo shares held in trust by us. 



The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

"There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52°Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade for illuminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity that has ever come to this State slip into compantively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because they did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
any speculative venture, but in actually proven lands, which can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $s, 000 per acre, and which in a few 
years will be worth five times that price." 



Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three. Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates 900,000 shares. 
We act as trustee foi this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will be taken up and the pooled 
stock of the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus if three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
payer the investment would still yield nyi percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 



THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELDS. One c m- 
pany is pumping 52 gravity oil, selling it at $1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1,150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well ; third company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset, 
and land holdings, drilling rig. and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 

INDEX. 

Facts Worth Reading Costly Advertising 

Investigations Why Some Corporations Fail 

Trust Fund Our Plan 

Debentures A Word About Our Business 

Experienced Management A Good Thing to Do 

A Word of Caution Satisfied Stockholders , 

Our Invariable Rule The Percent of Failures , 

No Man Always Knows A Refinery ; 

Loan s to Customers Maps and Photographs 

Our Profits , Ten Reasons Why 

The Big Four The Price of Oil 

Directors of The Oil Companies Press Notes 

Reports Upon The Property Faithin Oil 

Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 



THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL OIL PROPOSITION: 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade oil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 

Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIIMC OIL RKPORTKR 



THE COALINGA FIELD. 



Producers Complain ot Lack of Tank Cars 
for Transportation Purposes. 



Over Eighty Producing Wells Now in the Field, Which 

is Capable of Easily Producing Yearly More 

Than 1,500,000 Barrels of Superior Oil. 



In 1901 the Coalnga field pro- 
duced 740,000 barrels of oil. At 
the close of the year there were in 
the field a total of only 41 wells 
that were producing. 33 wells that 
could produce on demand being 
shut in and capped, on account of 
both lack of demand for their pro- 
duct and lack of transportation 
facilities. 

The 41 producing wells were 
located near the center of the 
field, principally in sections 20 
and 28. Their average daily yield, 
according to the figures, was only 



trict, and immediately commenced 
active development work. 

Nine complete rigs were secured, 
and eleven wells were drilled, 
three of them being in the south- 
west corner of section 21, town- 
ship 19. range 15, and eight in the 
northwest corner of 2, 19-15. 

These wells are of different 
depths running from 800 to 1,400 
feet. Their productive capacity 
has not as yet been actively tested 
owing to the lack of railroad trans- 
portation. It is thought that these 
wells can easily produce 2,000 bar- 



Kern River product. These tank 

can theu be used for I 
porting the product of the ( 
inga field. 

This field can now produce near- 
ly, if nut quite, 1.500,000 barrels of 
oil a year, if the market required 
it and transportation facilities 
could be obtained. This supply 
could be furnished from the wells 
now drilled within marketable dis- 
tance of Ora. Much of this oil is 
capable of being refined. 

The yield of this field could be 
doubled every six months, as there 
are thousands of acres of land as 
yet untouched by the drill, which 
are undoubtedly first-class oil land. 

There are probably at least 40 
complete rigs now in the Coalinga 
field, most of them now idle, which 
could be put into practical use, 
provided there was a market for 
the product, and transportation fa- 
cilities to handle it. 

There is earnest talk of a pipe- 
line from this district to the bay. 
If the talk ever materializes into 
action, and a pipe-line is built, it 
would undoubtedly pay from the 
start, so far as there being a suf- 
ficient quantity of oil is concerned. 



branch line to connect with its 
field, only 
eighteen mi is away. Both of 
plana are feasible, and no 
doubt have been entertained by 
both these great concerns. At 
present neither has taken the 
matter up in earnest, though it 
would appear that either could 
handle the oil to advantage, the 
Standard especially, when its 
Point Richmond refinery is com- 
pletely in operation. 

If, after waiting a reasonable 
time, neither of these companies 
comes to the rescue of the pro- 
ducers of the Coalinga field, the 
producers themselves will take up 
the matter and endeavor to effect 
some solution of the transportation 
problem which is to-day the only 
obstacle in the way of making the 
Coalinga field one of the greatest 
oil fields in California. 

There were 321 cars of oil 
shipped out of the Coalinga field^ 
last month, or an average of a lit- 
tle over 10 cars a day. This is a 
very small amount of oil to be 
shipped from as good a producing 
district as that, but the scarcity of 
car* for shipment still continues, 




Portion of the Coalinga Oh District, Fresno County, California. 
The picture shows the camp of the California Oil Fields, Limited, well No. i of the Sauer Dough, well No. 

wells of the California Oil Fields, Limited, with storage tanks. 



about 230 barrels a day, or at the 
rate of a little more than 5 barrels 
to the well. 

This, however, was not the pro- 
ducing cap city of these wells. 
For lack of market and transport- 
ation facilities the wells were not 
allowed to produce near what they 
could. A few, but very few, owned 
by companies who had large con- 
tracts, were enabled to pump their 
wells quite steadily, but outside of 
these few, the pumps were idle 
most of the time, so that many 
wells, able to show a steady out- 
put of 200 barrels a day, did not 
yield more than at the rate of 5 
barrels a day. This accounts for 
the low average. 

The accompanying table shows 
that the company having the larg- 
est number of producing wells in 
the Coalinga field is the California 
Oil Fields, Limited, which is a 
close corporation of English capit- 
alists of which Robert Ballour of 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co., is the 
chairman, and Arthur W. Rowe is 
the Secretary. The main office is 
in London. 

A year ago last May the Com- 
pany secured possession of 4>5 I 3 
acres of land in the Coalinga dis- 



rels a day. The oil is of 22° and 
29 gravity, the former being used 
for fuel and the latter for refining 
purposes, the 29° gravity oil being 
used very largely by the refinery 
recently erected at Fresno, where 
a very fine quality of illuminating 
oil and resulting distillates are pro- 
duced. This oil is worth 75 cents 
on the cars at Ora. 

This company has its own pipe- 
line from the storage tanks at the 
wells to the railroad at Ora, a dis- 
tance of eight miles, the pipe hav- 
ing a diameter of four inches, and 
being able to carry several thou- 
sand barrels of oil daily. At the 
wells the company has a storage 
capacity of 8,000 barrels, and its 
tanks at Ora will hold 20,000 bar- 
rels capacity each. At the wells 
there are four tanks, two for 
heavy and two for light oil. 

The company is doing no devel- 
opment work at present, waiting 
for an increase in transportation 
facilities, which will enable it to 
market its oil. 

When the Standard pipe-line for 
Kern oil is completed, it is ex- 
pected that many more tank cars 
will be supplied which are now in 
daily use for the McKittrick and 



The only trouble is the present 
lack of an assured market to 
handle the large amount of oil 
which must be carried by a pipe- 
line in order to make the line pay. 

There are now in the field sev- 
eral pipelines owned by indi 
vidual companies, and other com- 
panies whose land is located in 
other directions would a'so have 
their own lines all radiating from 
a common center. These lines to- 
gether would carry to a common 
center all the oil that a big, 
pipe-line to the bay could possibly 
handle. 

As the oil from this district is 
coming more and more into de- 
mand as the refinery people learn 
how to handle it properly, and ap- 
preciate its value for refining pur- 
poses, the question of transporta- 
tion is becoming more and more 
vital to the success of the entire 
field. The time is undoubtedly 
near at hand when the transporta- 
tion problem will be solved. 

Some assert that the great Union 
Oil company which already has a 
pipe-line and large storage capa- 
city in the field will build a line 
to its refinery at 01 p um. Others 
assert the Standard will bui'd a 



1 of the Caribon, and five 

greatly to the detriment of the 
district. 

There are at present in the Coal- 
inga field proper 23 oil companies 
which have producing wells 
These are as follows: 



Name of Company. 



Chanslor& Canfield... 

Coalinga 

Home 

Cala. Oil Fields, Ltd.. . 
Cala. Oil Fields, Ltd.. . 

Sauer Dough 

Caribou 

Fauna 

Hanford 

Independence 

Twentv-Eight 

Oil City Petroleum 

Producers Guaranteed. 

JE,taa 

Confidence 

Maine State 

Commercial 

El Capitan 

Phila. & S. F 

Fresno & S. F 

Mercantile Crude 

York Coalinga 

S. F. Crude 

Esperanza 

St. Paul-Fresno 



17, i9-'5 
20. 19-15 

20, 19-15 

21, 19-15 

27, 19 15 

22, I9"'5 

22. 19-15 

28, 19-15 
28, T9-I5 
28, 19-15 
28, 19-15 
28, 19 15 
3'. i9-!5 
3°. 19-15 
31, 19 »5 
3', I9"'5 
31. 19 '5 
31. 19-15 
36, 19-14 

1, 20-14 
6, 20-15 
6, 20-15 
6, 20-15 
6, 20-15 

23. 20-14 



(24) Total. 



82 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

November ia, 1902. 

Now that the election is over and the 
smoke of battle cleared away, a slightly 
better feeling has been apparent on the 
exchange. 

The stocks most actively dealt in have 
been firmly held, and what trades have 
been made were fully up to l>st week's 
prices, and in some instances an advance 
was recorded. Several hundred shares of 
Peerless changed hands at an advance of 
from 50 cents to 75 cents over last week's 
figures, closing at $9. A few shares of 
Sterling were sold under forced sales as 
low as |i. 50, but that figure was offered 
at the close for the stock in large blocks. 
Home remains steady with an occasional 
sale at $2.80. Monte Cristo is firmly 
held atfi.io with a few sales at $i.07J4. 
The assessment of 1% cents a share 
levied on Monday on Independence 
seems to have been pretty well dis- 
counted as 4 cents is offered with little to 
be had at that figure. 

In many instances there is quite a wide 
margin between the bid and asking 
price, whilst in other cases the dividing 
line between buyers and sellers is very 
thin, and a slight concession on either 
side would effect business. To promote 
trading in some of the cheap stocks, it 
might be well for the Board to allow bids 
to be accepted at an advance of half a 
cent, or even a quarter of a cent. Take 
stock like Ivion and Independence, for in- 
stance, an advance bid must be a rise of 
20 or 25 percent respectively over the 
value of the stock, which would be aH 
unheard of rise in the case of a higher 
priced stock. 

The old "bue-a-boo" of "water in 
the wells" has been played again as a 
trump card to depress the value of 
Monte Cristo on section 5, but just why 
it should affect section 33 so as to cause 
a sale of Imperial at I15 is a little hard 
to understand. 33 and Imperial, own- 
ing between them all of the section, are 
each paying at the present price about 
16 percent per annum interest upon the 
investment. 

In miscellaneous securities there has 
been little business transacted during 
the week, buyers and sellers seemingly 
being too wide apart. 

With the exception of a rise of several 
points in Giant Powder, and a slight ap- 
preciation in the value of some of the 
Sugar stocks, there is little change to 
note. 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November 12: 
FOUR. 

500 at {50 1 1.S0 00 

HOME OIL. 

225 at 2 80 630 00 

IMPERIAL. 

100 at 15 00 1,500 00 

. INDEPENDENCE. 

1,000 at 04 (S 30) 40 00 

3,5 )o at 04 140 00 

MONARCH. 

1,100 at 17 ,. 18700 

MONTE CRISTO. 

1,500 at 1 oT/i 1,61250 

300 at 1 07K (B 10) 32250 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

1,000 at 14 14000 

PEERLESS 

20 at 8 50 170 00 

100 at 875 87500 

500 at 9 00 4, 500 00 

50 at 9 00 ( B 30) 450 00 



STERLING. 

200 at 1 52^ 30500 

100 at 1 50 150 00 

100 at 153(C) 15000 

looat 155 15500 



10,395 Shares Amount |n,577 00 

ALASKA PACKERS. 

5 at 161 00 805 00 

FIREMENS' FUND. 

33 at 31450 10,37850 

HUTCHINSON SUGAR. 

15 at 14 75 222 25 

MOKAWELI SUGAR. 

65 at 2300 1,49500 

NORTHERN CAL. POWER CO. 

100 at 8 00 800 00 

ONOMEA SUGAR. 

50 at 23 00 11,50 00 

SPRING VALLEY WATER. 

20 at 85 25 1,705 00 

UNION SUGAR. 
37 at 11 I2}£ 411 62 



325 Shares 



Amount 116,966. 37 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks, 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L- CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. EWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building, Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Excbauge Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mms 

Bdildino, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: Calif jrnia Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, S. F. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

LOMA PRIETA PRUNE RANCH COMPANY, 
Location and principal place of business, 
San Francisco, California. Location of ranch. 
Monterey County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at the meeting of the 
Board of Directors held on the lothdayol Nov- 
ember, 1902, an assessment of five (S5.00) dollars 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immed ately in United 
States Gold Coin, at the office of ihe Secretaiy, 
3331 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 10th day of December, 
1902, will be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Friday, the gth day of 
January, 1903. to pr.y the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

FRANK MORTON, Secretary. 



P» A f\ j a year. How to make it, 

all " ercent «- n --- j - ; ^° hn8t ° n ' 



Newport, R. I. 



Fishing Tools 




PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

Largest Supply of Fishing Tools | No other company has all the odd 
in California Kept for Rent. | sizes as we have. 



JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 



J 



MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 385 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Home," paying monthly dividends of 7J£ cents per share. 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"United Tonopah" 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Lightner," paying monthly dividends of 5 cents per share, 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Write to the undersigned for information regarding Oil and 
Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, returning 10 
percent to 24 percent per annum; alfo for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

336 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wreech *"«&&*>**«*** 



bits in drilling stem boxes 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 

MANCFACTUKBD BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Phone, Black 1071, 



BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



W. E. YOULE 





! 




:..J? 






' '"Ira 








IIP 




















'.** ' >• 










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'T'Twia* 


1 




™B§ 


jrf*s=] 


^%MI 






. _- . ^ t= ~z£~^^^* : ' 




^?*5^v^7 


irl-»-J 



CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Looatiou given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil I,ands and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Present Address; 

Ar buckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



r-ACiMC OIL RBPORTKK 



OILED ROADS. 

A Process of Making Them Sold 
to Be 8atl»fnctnry. 

The secret of making a really 
satisfactory oiled road lies in 
thoroughly incorporating the oil 
with the soil. Engineer B. \V. 
Case, of Colorado springs, Colo., 
who has made a special study of 
the oiled roads of California with 
a view to adopting the system in 
Colorado springs, says that the 
proper method of using the oil in 
street or road construction is to 
prepare the street or roadbed by 
excavating to a depth of from four 
to six inches below grade. This 
sub-grade should be rolled into a 
firm, solid roadbed. Should the 
materials at the sub-grade not be 
capable of solidifying by rolling, 
then the material necessary to 
make a solid roadbed should be 
added, and thoroughly rolled, 
keeping in view the proper 
crowning and drainage. Upon 
this prepared roadbed trom two to 
four inches of gravel should be 
spread, Sprinkle this layer of 
gravel thoroughly, taking great 
care that every part of the layer 
is thoroughly wet, so that it will 
compact itself as much as possible, 
without rolling. Whtn suffi- 
ciently dry on the surface, the oil, 
heated to about 200 Fahrenheit, 
should be sprinkled over the sur- 
face, in sufficient quantity that 
the graveled roadbed will be 
thoroughly saturated, but no oil 
left standing. The whole is then 
covered with a thin layer of sand, 
from one-quarter to one-half inch, 
and thoroughly harrowed, not to 
exceed one inch in depth. After 
about forty-eight, hours, the road- 
bed is again sprinkled with the 
heated oil, covered with sand and 
harrowed. The quantity of oil 
is much less at this second appli- 
cation. Three times should the 
roadbed be sprinkled with the hot 
oil, covered with sand and har- 
rowed, but after having thoroughly 
harrowed the roadbed for the 
third time, it should be well rolled 
with a light roller, care being 
taken that the roller is not heavy 
enough to break the bond. A 
road or street prepared in this 
way will be nearly as good as an 
asphalt paved street, at about one- 
fifth of the cost. This method 
does away with objections raised, 
viz.: the tracking of oil into 
houses, the soiling of ladies' 
dresses and the annoyance of the 
oil flying from the wheels when 
driving or bicycle riding. 



1 man only is required to work the 

1 whole arrangement. The fuel 
used was Borneo oil, and the 
amount of fuel consumed on an 
average of a long series of tests 
was less than six gallons per hour. 
Actual tea drying was carried on 
during the whole of the experi 
ment.s. A great advantage ot the 
new system is the equality of 
temperature for drying that can 
be maintained, whereas with fire- 

jwood, as the tea makers know, 
that is a very difficult matter. It 
is said that with fuel oil a con- 
siderable saving in cost can be 

1 made. There is every reason to 
believe that fuel oil for tea drying 
will in the near future become al- 
most universal. — London Petrol- 
eum Review. 



Oil Tests. 

The gravity of an oil represents 
I how much lighter it is than water. 
The fire lest of a kerosene oil 
shows what degree of heat it will 
stand without exploding. The oil 
I we commonly burn will stand 1,50° 
without exploding. The ker- 
osene which is sold in Europe will 
stand only about uo° of heat. 
It would be illegal to sell such 
oil in New York State or Pennsyl- 
vania. 



OIL IN CBYLON. 



Successful Experiments With the 
New Fuel In Drying Tea. 

Extensive experiments with oil 
to be used as fuel for tea drying 
in place of firewood have recently 
been conducted in Ceylon with 
apparently very gratifying re- 
sults. The steam jet system is 
used, and absolutely no alteration 
for the use of fuel oil is required 
in the furnace. The burner is 
placed on the front of the furnace 
on trunnions, and can be swung 
out of position at a moment's 
notice when the furnace is again 
ready for solid fuel. The oil tank 
can be placed at any convenient 
place in or near the factory. One 




SmitfcPremier £ 
Typewriters 5 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

"Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Sohools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Associat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge. 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
10 Montfcemery St. San Francisco. 

Branch Stores: 
Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. . 



Opportunities in a Lifetime A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. E. 

219 Crocker Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



fleadqaarters Sckaol. (iTenaeit and 
Oil Laids io California. 



School lac.U m«> be taken from 160 to &40 acre*. 
L«ini» abound in all cc unuc. in State They le- 

Liiiiif nouii.v ic« on Unit or 

cuHivalMm. and cmrrv all mineral* »nd drpoaJts. 

been made In all the Now 

>1 ted to 
Farming. Rat ching. Timber l.anda and atc the 
-afrst and Cheap* »t ^speculation in ihc Untied 
Bend -tamp for Land llook and rircular*. 
Fine proven oil landa to offer. Correspondence 
aollclied B»Ubtl»hcd 1885. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



If You are going East call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, or Dollar top 
Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 
e. o. Mccormick. t. h. goodman, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United States and 

■™— ■" Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



/CYGNET PETROI^KtJM CO 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location— Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. I, Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-presi Jent, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Capital stock, 
12,850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 30 producing wells. Officers and directors' 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
clpal office, Potomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 

Capital $$00,000 

Treasury stock $300,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coaltnga near 
Home Oil company, Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Leased 6000 acres asphaltum land in Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Falkenberu, president; M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawson, R P Chase, Col E J 
Ensign. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 853 Market 
street. San Francisco, Cal. 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum 0)1, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



i. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., • San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry the Ulrsest stock. Onr price* are 
Eq ' 



Equitable. 



Tel. Main, 1183. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. 
24 FREMONT ST. 



San Francisco, Cal 



The Star Drilling Machine 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests rarj g e from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especiall> 

1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and In many foreign countries. 

We also make full tine of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. AKRON, OHIO. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure Gilt=Bdged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 



ACRES m ACRES 



of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected. Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 



Stock Nonassessable. 



4T5=476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 



American Steel & Wire Co, 



CHICAGO NEW JfORK WORCESTER DENVER SAN FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers o? 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 

American Steel Wire Pumping Line 

American Steel Wire Tubing Line 

American Steel Wire Sand Line 



Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 
PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 




CITY SALES OFFICE 

8 and IP Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GEO. H. 1SM0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. IO 



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B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
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Vol. 4. No. 3. 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., FRIDAY, NOVF.MBER 2t, 1902. 



ANNUAL CONVENTION. 



Successful Annual Gathering of the Miners 
of California. 



The Oil Industry of the State Receives Special Atten- 
tion and Interesting Papers Are Read By Special- 
ists on Different Phases of the Industry. 



The eleventh annual convention 
of the California Miners' Associa- 
tion has been held this week in San 
Francisco. 

At this convention the oil indus- 
try was represented, several of the 
most interesting papers read at the 
convention pertaining to this most 
important branch of the mining in- 
dustry- 

The oil industry was represented 
by the California Petroleum Min- 
ers' Association, which sent the fol- 
lowing delegates: Hon. M. H. De 
Young, Arthur R. Briggs, G. X. 
Wendling, G. H. Ismon, Dr. C. T. 
Deane, Prof. E. P. Heald, E. A. 
Denicke, W. B. Winn. 

In his opening address President 
E. C. Voorheis spoke of the great 
and increasingly important part 
oil was playing in the mining in- 
dustry of the State, and prophesied 
great things in store for the young 
giant. Dr. C. T. Deane read a 
paper on " The Oil Industry of 
California from a Commercial 
Standpoint," which was listened to 
with the closest attention and re- 
ceived deserved applause. 

Alfred Von der Ropp, a Prussian 
nobleman, who is superintendent 
and general manager of the Selby 
Smelting company's big plant, and 
rated as one of the foremost men in 
his line in America, read a very 
practical paper on his experiences 
with crude oil as fuel in smelting. 
The paper is published below, and 
contains information of great value 
to users of crude petroleum, no 
matter for what purpose the oil 
may be used. 

Mr. A. M. Hunt, general man- 
ager of the Spreckels Gas Plant, 
and, designer of the Independent 
Electric Light and Power com- 
pany's system, read an exceedingly 
valuable and suggestive paper on 
" The Use of Crude Oil as Fuel as 
Compared with Coal." Lack of 
space compels the postponement of 
the publication of this paper until 
next week. 

The address of Dr. C. T. Deane 
was as follows: 

Mr. President and Gentlemen of 
the California Miners' Association: 

One year ago, when I had the 
honor of reading a paper on " The 
Oil Industry of California " before 
you, I said: " I present the follow- 
ing facts and suggestions on the oil- 
mining industry of the State. In 
it are included statistics gleaned 
from the most reliable sources upon 
the subject, which will demonstrate 
to you the marvelous development 
which has taken place during the 



last twelve months along the great 
oil belt, together with the possibili- 
ties in store, from a commercial 
standpoint, for an industry which 
already ranks as one of the most 
important in the State." I have 
now to continue the story from the 
time elapsed since writing the 
above. Without going into the 
scientific phase of the question, 
leaving that for abler hands, we 
will simply review the situation 
from a commercial standpoint. 

DIFFERENT OIL DISTRICTS. 

There are now in California 2,500 
producing wells, situated in fourteen 
different districts, as follows: Kern 
River, Sunset, Midway, McKittrick, 
Coalinga, Santa Maria, Los An- 
geles, Fullerton, Puente, Whittier, 
Ventura, Summerland, Brea Can- 
yon and San Mateo; of these, the 
chief oil-producing districts are 
Kern River, Sunset, McKittrick 
and Midway in Kern County, Coal- 
inga in Fresno County, Fullerton 
in Orange County and Santa Maria, 
or Carreaga, in Santa Barbara Coun- 
ty- 

YEARLY OIL CONSUMPTION. 

The total consumption of oil in 
California in 

1900 was 4,000,000 barrels. 

1901 " 8,000,000 " 

1902 will be 12,000,000 " 

1903 (Estimated). 20,000,000 " 

The increase next year will be 
largely due to the railroads burn- 
ing oil exclusively. The reason 
they have not done so heretofore is 
the delay in placing tankage, which 
is rather a slow process, it being 
necessary to place an oil tank 
wherever there is now a coal bunk- 
er, about fifty miles apart along 
the whole line. 

I have calculated very carefully 
the amount the railroad compa- 
nies will use, and, taking a very 
conservative view, I cannot make 
it below 8,000,000 barrels, equal in 
amount to what the whole State 
consumed in 1901. I have had this 
estimate confirmed by several dif- 
erent experts, both railroad and oil 
men. One of the very best informed 
of these gentlemen makes it 10,000,- 
000 barrels, which certainly places 
me within bounds. 

The factories, railroads, electric 
light companies and gas companies 
(gas is now being made exclusively 
from oil) in and around San Fran- 
cisco will certainly use 3,000,000 
barrels, (Fire Marshal Towe in- 
forms me there are over three hun- 
dred boilers using oil daily in San 
Francisco), and we have left for the 
rest of the State 9,000,000 barrels, 
which is hardly enough, when you 
take into consideration the steam- 
ers, mines, electric roads and light 



companies, fact ompaniea, 

refineries, ! ing ■ demand 

all over this vast territory. 

Railroads B.000,000 bids. 

Sun Francisco and vicinitv ti.OOO.oon " 
Rest of the State., . ^.imki.OOO " 

Total 20,000,000 " 

Prophesying is ■ thankless task, 
but from a careful consideration 
of all the facts which are daily 
brOUghl to my attention it is safe 

to conclude thai before the end of 
1905 we will be producing and mar- 
keting 60 000,000 barrels of oil per 

annum, but for the present 20,000,- 
000 is a safe estimate. 

If every well now existing was 
pumping to its full capacity, 16,- 
000,000 barrels is as much as we 
could put into consumption. A 
very large number of the 2,500 
wells alluded to above (at least 
1,000) are in or near the City of 
Los Angeles, and these wells pro- 
duce less than one million and a 
half barrels per year, so we have 
therefore to look for our great sup- 
ply in the future to the other dis- 
tricts — Fullerton, Kern River, Coal- 
inga, Sunset, Midway and McKit- 
trick. It is easy to perceive from 
these figures that the main difficul- 
ty for »ome time to come will be to 
provide a supply of oil in conform- 
ity with the continually growing 
demand. 

PRICE OF OIL TO ADVANCE. 

Instead of capped wells, and 
each corporation underbidding each 
other, trying to force the price of 
oil down for selfish purposes, all 
caps will be removed, and pumps 
will work day and night to meet 
this demand; oil, instead of 20 
cents per barrel, will jump to 35, 
40 and 50 cents. 

It was only a year ago that at 
Beaumont, Texas, oil was going 
begging at 5 cents, and it is hard 
to get to-day at 35 cents. I am 
afraid that some of the corporations 
that have been making long con- 
tracts at almost cost price will be 
trying to evade them, and it will 
not be astonishing to see a heavy 
crop of lawsuits. 

TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES. 

There are 1,300 tank cars owned 
by the Southern Pacific and Santa 
Fe Railroads and the Standard Oil 
Company, and a few more by out- 
side companies carrying oil in Cali- 
fornia. There should be at least 
2,000 cars to do the business. The 
railroad is using a large number fill- 
ing its own tanks, and there is fre- 
quently a shortage for commercial 
purposes. The California Petroleum 
Miners' Association has been trying 
for two weeks unsuccessfully to get 
two tank cars to send to Washing- 
ton for the purpose of testing Cali- 
fornia oil in the naval furnace there 
for use on our national ships. 
Whether this condition will be re- 
lieved after the completion of the 
pipe-line which the Standard Oil 
company is now building from 
Kern County to Point Richmond, 
on the Bay of San Francisco, is 
problematical, as they will require 
a large quantity of oil for their great 
refinery, which is about completed 
at that place. It is assumed that 
they will be able to transport from 
eight to ten thousand barrels per 
day through the pipe. This pipe- 
line is eight inches in diameter and 
278 miles long. 



Price, Ten Cents. 

The i-ost of transporting oil from 
Kem County to San Fra 

now about in cents, including 
switching, etc. I doubt very much 

whether a lower cost of transporta- 
tion will particularly help the pro- 
ducer, bul it certainly must the 
consumer, as he is the man to pay 
all costs of production. 

the life of the wells. 

The next thing to take into con- 
sideration is the life of the wells. 
The life of an oil district depends 
upon the number of proven acres 

and the depth of the Ol] sand. Ex- 
perts contend that about 20 percent 
of the sand is oil, and that about 
80 percent of the oil contained in 
the sand can be recovered; conse- 
quently, in a district where the 
sand is 300 feet thick, there should 
be a little less than a half million 
barrels to the acre, or a patch of 20 
acres, roughly speaking, should give 
8,000,000 barrels. It is claimed by 
many of the most careful experts 
that about 10,000 acres in these 
four districts, viz.: Kern River, 
Sunset, Midway and McKittrick 
have been proven; by proven we 
mean that wherever on these acres 
you sink a well you will most prob- 
ably get oil, so that if you have 
10,000 acres of land, with sand 300 
feet thick, (the real fact is that on 
a great deal of the above lands the 
sand is over 500 feet thick) we 
ought to have close to half a million 
barrels to the acre, or allowing for 
first and second-class land at least 
two thousand million barrels of oil, 
so there is no need of this genera- 
tion worrying much whether it will 
last our time. 

GREAT PRODUCTIVE CAPABILITIES 

Mr. H. L. Dort, a very careful 
and over-cautious expert in those 
fields, writes me as follows: "A care- 
ful consideration of the demon- 
strated area of these Kern County 
oil fields, the thickness and oil-con- 
taining qualities of the sands, justi- 
fies the belief that they contain con- 
siderably more than 1,000,000,000 
barrels of oil, and possibly twice as 
much. The total oil production in 
the United States, from its discov- 
ery up to the discovery of the Kern 
County oil fields, is estimated by 
the most competent authorities at 
about 1,000,000,000 barrels, and 
this county alone may eventually 
produce more than this amount, 
and in a form, as a cheap fuel, the 
most necessary factor to the devel- 
opment of the Coast's manufactur- 
ing and transportation industries, 
and very necessary to the mining, 
agricultural and domestic interests, 
which will redound more to the 
general advantage of the State as a 
whole than any other of its natural 
resources." 

These figures ma}' seem large, but 
when you take into consideration 
other great oil districts, Baku, in 
Russia, for instance, which has pro- 
duced 75,000,000 barrels annually 
for a great many years, and an ex- 
pert from there, who was recently 
inspecting our lands, told me he 
considered them equal to those at 
Baku. We certainly ought to be- 
lieve him. When asked what the 
lands in Baku were worth, he said 
$50,000 an acre. I leave you to 
draw your own conclusions. 

OIL REFINERIES. 

The number of refineries reported 



1 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



last year was eleven; this year I 
have to report thirty-three. These 
refineries. make asphalt, lubricants, 
distillates and coke. The amount 
of asphalt imported from foreign 
countries last year was 154,729 long 
tons. California produced last year 
21,634 long tons of the value of 
$315,219, according to the report of 
Mr. Lewis E. Aubury, State Min- 
eralogist. This year we ought to 
produce 35,000 long tons. For the 
purpose of competing with the for- 
eign supply we should have a pro- 
tective tariff on asphalt and lower 
freight transportation. At the pres- 
ent time the railroad charges $11.00 
per ton to Missouri-River points. 

OIL SUPERSEDING COAL. 

Coal importations from foreign 
countries have dropped off nearly 
one^half the past year, as the fol- 
lowing letter from Mr. J. W. Har- 
rison, coal expert, shows: 

San Francisco, Cal., Nov. 8, 1902. 

Dr. C. T. Deane, Mills Building, City. 
Dear Sir : The total arrivals of for- 
eign coals from Australia, England and 
Wales for the first nine months of 1901, 
foot up 749,943 tons. The quantity im- 
ported here from the same sources for 
the first nine months of 1902 foot up 
440,023 tons, showing a shrinkage this 
year, for the same period of time, of 309,- 
920 tons. 

The prices for bituminous grades, im- 
ported principally from Australia, will 
average about $6.00 per long ton in 
cargo lots. For anthracite coal from 
Swansea, the average cost per cargo will 
be about $7.75 per ton. 

The quantity of foreign coal now afloat 
en route to San Francisco, is less than 
has been known for many years. 
Yours truly, 

J. W. Harrison. 

This shows that we have kept in 
the State $2,169,440 which other- 
wise would have gone to foreign 
countries. The importations of 
domestic coal have fallen off more 
than 25 percent. 

There is a great deal of talk 
about the present prosperity in 
San Francisco. This is largely due 
to the discovery of oil. Manufac- 
turing has been encouraged by the 
low price of fuel oil, costing about 
75 cents to the consumer, equal to 
$3.00 per ton for coal. 

Dividends from oil properties 
have amounted during the past 
two years to over two million dol- 
lars. This sum, together with the 
money retained, which would other- 
wise have gone out of the State for 
coal, has instead gone to swell the 
capital accumulating with the banks 
all over California, helping to boom 
the market for realty and invest- 
ments, which has been so active 
and buoyant of late. 

OIL IN ORE REDUCTION. 

It has not yet been demonstrated 
that iron ore can be smelted in 
commercial quantities with oil, al- 
though it has been done as a labor- 
atory process, but there are many 
who believe that it is only a ques- 
tion of time when this will be ac- 
complished; but even of coke, we 
will have a goodly supply at prob- 
ably reduced figures when the great 
refinery of the Standard Oil com- 
pany gets into operation in a few 
months from now, as I understand, 
they will not make asphaltum, but 
coke. 

LIQUID FUEL FOR STEAMERS. 

It might be well to mention here 
the successful use of oil as a fuel 
for marine boilers. There are 200 
boilers now using oil in this State. 
The steamers of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company are being altered, 
as the Mariposa running to Tahiti 
has proven such a success. She is 
now on her fifth trip, and I under- 
stand that the owners save in the 



neighborhood of $200 per day. The 
Pacific Mail is also inquiring into 
the advisability of using oil on its 
steamers. One important fact has 
been proven by the use of oil, and 
that is increased speed is obtained 
of almost a knot an hour. This is 
accounted for by the fact that the 
heat is more continuous and reg- 
ular for the reason that the furnace 
doors are not being continually 
opened for the purpose of keeping 
up the fires. You hear so much 
said about oil fuel deteriorating the 
fired parts of boilers that we have 
made careful inquiry on the sub- 
ject from Mr. John K. Bulger, 
United States Local Inspector of 
Boilers for this coast, and he re- 
ports that the boilers of the steam- 
er Pasadena, inspected by him in 
August, 1902, and which have been 
burning oil for the past eleven 
years, were in perfect condition, also 
that the boilers of the George 
Loomis, which have been burning 
oil for the past eight years, and 
which were inspected in Novem- 
ber, 1902, were the same, there be- 
ing no signs of crystallization show- 
ing on any of the fired parts. 

Lieutenant Ward P. Winchell, 
United States Navy, in his report 
to the Navy Department in regard 
to the success attending the use of 
oil for fuel on the first trans-Pacific 
trip of the steamer Mariposa to 
Tahiti, said: " The most careful in- 
spection at Tahiti failed to show 
any bad effect of the flame upon the 
boilers." 

As to the safety of burning oil 
in marine boilers we have simply 
to say that the insurance compa- 
nies have not raised their rates on 
oil-burning steamers, which an^ 
swers that question thoroughly. 

OIL ON ROADS. 

The dusty-road nuisance will be 
a thing of the past in a few years, 
due to sprinkling with oil, and 
railroad travel in this State will be 
made much more agreeable. The 
general manager of the Santa Fe 
system, Mr. A. G. Wells, informs 
me that they have oiled 666.5 miles 
of their roadbed to their great satis- 
faction, and we are reliably in- 
formed, although not officially, that 
the Southern Pacific have oiled over 
three hundred miles of theirs. The 
several counties in the State are oil- 
ing their roads, and find it 50 per- 
cent cheaper than water. As a local 
object lesson we have the drives in 
our beautiful Golden Gate Park, 
which have been oiled now for over 
two years, and the public are en- 
thusiastic as to the result. 

There are about 5,000 barrels of 
oil a day coming to San Francisco 
by rail. Reliable statistics of what 
comes by sea are not obtainable. 

OIL IN MANUFACTURING INDUS- 
TRIES. 

Another point upon which I wish 
to dwell is the increase which has 
taken place of late in local man- 
ufacturing industries. The 12,000,- 
000 barrels of oil which will be 
consumed this year represent in 
fact 3,000,000 tons of coal. This is 
fully one sixth more than the total 
amount of coal ever before con- 
sumed annually in this State. This 
can be ascribed solely to the enlarge- 
ment of the manufacturing inter- 
ests brought about by the decline in 
the cost of fuel, and, had it not 
been for the discovery of oil in 
California, manufacturers would 
never have been able to branch out 
as they have done the past two 
years, in a way which not only 
enables them to hold their own 
with their Eastern rivals, but to 
enter the field as competitors. 



INVESTMENT OF FOREIGN CAPITAL. 

There are a number of foreign 
syndicates quietly buying our oil 
lands, while our own rich men hes- 
itate to make the same investments. 
An English gentleman, the agent of 
London capitalists, told me- they 
were selling five dollars' worth for 
25 cents down in Kern. There are 
a number of English, French and 
Belgian companies now in exist- 
ence, which few people in this coun- 
try ever hear of, and two of these 
companies that I know of are pay- 
ing dividends. The oil business is 
so new to us that our business men 
do not as yet apprciate its im- 
portance; when they do, they will 
have to pay much larger prices for 
land than they can get it for to- 
day. Proven oil lands are selling 
from $500 to $5,000 an acre. These 
lands could have been bought two 
or three years ago readily at $10 
an acre. In a few years they will 
sell for three times the price they 
are selling for now. 

COST OF PUMPING. 

The cost of pumping oil varies 
according to the number ofwells. 
A large number, say ten or twenty, 
ought not to cost over 1.5 or 2 cents 
per barrel (42 gallons). I know of 
one exceedingly well-managed com- 
pany which has reduced the cost to 
1 cent a barrel. 

DEPTH AND COST OF THE WELLS. 
The wells in Kern River, Sunset, 
Midway and McKittrick average 
from 900 to 1,200 feet in depth, and 
ought to cost, barring accidents, 
about $5,000 each to sink. This 
does not include the rig. 

CONSERVATIVE FIGURES. 

The above is briefly an account 



of the oil landB of California from 
a commercial point of view. All 
the figures are absolutely conserva- 
tive and the California Petroleum 
officially. As I saidlast year, the 
California Petroleum Miners' Asso- 
ciation will vouch for them. This 
Association feels that in making 
statements of the kind quasi-public 
as they are in character, they 
should be as correct as a govern- 
ment official report, free from mis- 
statements or exaggerations, cal- 
culated to mislead. I have, there- 
fore, been particularly careful in 
collating facts, and when it was 
possible have had them verified 
Miners' Association desires to be 
free from any suspicion of attempt- 
ing to boom an industry which is 
abundantly able to stand on its 
own merits. 

The address of Mr. Alfred von 
der Ropp was as follows: 

Mr. President, and Gentlemen 
of the California Miners' Associa- 
tion: 

Through your secretary, Mr. E. 
Benjamin, I received a request to 
prepare a short paper "On the 
Use of Crude Oil in Smelting." 
This I have endeavored to do, 
confining myself entirely to the 
practical side of the subject, and 
leaving the discussion of heat 
units, chemical composition of 
liquid fuels, combustion-gases, etc., 
to our more scientific friends — the 
professors of the universities and 
technical schools. 

Fuel oil for the generation of 
steam is not my subject, and you 
all are no doubt familiar with this 
problem. However, let me state 
to you, that at the Selby Smelting 
and Lead company's works, we 
use liquid fuel exclusively for the 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



generation of steam — in Stirling 
water tube boilers, rated at 250 and 
aoo horsepower, respectively. We 
burn anlioil of from 26 to 27° 
gravity, and evaporate, per pound 
of oil. 14 1 - to 15 pounds of water, 
from and at 212 . Tbis gives you 
a basis to figure the comparative 
value of oil with coal as a steam 
generator. Another way of get- 
ting at the comparative values of 
liquid fuel and coal is the follow- 
ing: In a large matting furnace 
of the reverberatory type, it is 
considered that one ton of coal 
should smelt about three and one- 
half tons of ore. I find that in 
the same matting furnace at 
Selby, I can smelt ODe ton of ore 
with one barrel of oil: this would 
give us three and one-half barrels 
of oil to three and one-half tons of 
ore; or, In other words, three and 
one-half barrels of oil are equal to 
one ton of coal. One ton of good 
coal is worth today, in Sau Fran- 
cisco, we will say, $6. Ibis means 
that one barrel of oil at $1.71, or 
three and one-half barrels at $6, 
would be equal in effective value 
to one ton of coal at $6; and you 
all know that good fuel oil can be 
bou ht to-day in San Francisco 
for one-half of $1.71 per barrel, 
and even less. In other words 
you can save 50 percent and more 
by the use of liquid fuel instead 
of coal under the prevailing con- 
ditions and prices for coal and oil. 
I wish to mention right now 
that I am not interested in any oil 
wells or oil stocks, and am not at- 
tempting to boom liquid fuel. 

The following metallurgical fur- 
naces use crude oil at our works 
at Selby: 4 roasting furnaces, with 
a total of 11 burners; 1 matting 
furnace, with three burners; 1 
copper furnace, with 1 burner; 14 
14 lead furnaces with 14 burners; 
13 zinc retorts, with 13 burners; 
3 cupel furnaces with 3 burners; 
1 antimony furnace, with 1 burner; 
1 furnace for melting fine silver, 
with 1 burner. Total, 47. 

In all of these furnaces, the use 
of crude oil has brought about a 
saving of from forty to sixty per- 
cent in the cost of fuel over coal. 
And this does not represent all 
the benefit to be derived from the 
use of liquid fuel in metallurgical 
establishments. 

Let me quote you a few simple 
chemical re-actions that you all 
are more or less familiar with, and 
which are of vital importance to 
all metallurgical institutions. 

In the process of oxidizing sul- 
phide ores, commonly called roast- 
ing, or desulphurizing, it is neces- 
sary that the atmosphere in the 
roasting furnace should contain as 
much free oxygen as possible to 
enable the sulphur in the raw 
material to oxidize or burn off in 
the shape of sulphur di-oxlde 
(S. O. 2.), and sulphur tri-oxide 
(S. O. 3.) In using coal as fuel it 



Is impossible to maintain this oxi- 
dizing atmosphere all the time, 
because, every time that fresh fuel 
is fed to the firebox, black gases 
can be seen to fill the interior of 
the furnace, and during this pe- 
riod of incomplete combustion the 
process of roasting, or oxidizing, 
is absolutely at a standstill. What 
happens? A certain amount of 
fuel and time are wasted, and 
nothing is accomplished 

Now look at the ideal conditions 
prevailing in the roasting furnace 
when liquid fuel is used. Once 
the flame is regulated, by properly 
adjusting the oil and steam inlets, 
we have a clear flame, with not a 
trace of soot in the roasting cham- 
ber; and tbis ideal condition con- 
tinues for twenty four hours per 
day, enabling the sulphur in the 
ores to combine with the oxygen 
in the air during every fraction of 
a second. This means that we can 
crowd a roasting furnace using oil 
far beyond the capacity of a fur- 
nace using coal, and still we can 
produce a good end roast with the 
same percent of sulphur remain- 
ing. This means that we reduce 
the cost of fuel, labor, and repairs 
per ton or ore treated. In all 
metallurgical furnaces where the 
aim is to oxidize, these same bene- 
fits are to be derived from the use 
of liquid fuel. I quote you, for 
instance, the cupel furnace, where 
the lead is oxidized to litharge, 
leaving the silver and gold on the 
hearth, or test, as dore silver. 

But let me mention the matting 
furnace, of the reverberatory type. 
In this furnace the roasted ore is 
subjected to a white heat to pro- 
duce a quick sintering and melting 
down of the charge. The aim in 
this furnace is to produce, first: 
"a copper-iron matte, which acts 
as an accumulator for the precious 
matals;" and, secondly t "a slag 
which is formed from the earthy 
components of the ore." As matte 
is a compound of surphur and 
heavy metals, (mainly copper sul- 
phide and iron sulphide) in fixed 
proportions, it is self-evident that 
the percent of copper in the matte 
depends on the amount of sulphur 
remaining in the charge. 

Suppose now that we use coal 
as fuel in the matting furnace, we 
will have a reducing atmosphere 
whenever the fireman gets busy 
and fills the grate w ith fresh fuel, 
thus producing an incomplete 
combustion for a certain length of 
time. During this period no sul- 
phur can be oxidized by the oxy- 
gen of the air. With oil we have 
an oxidizing atmosphere during 
every second, and consequently 
we find that we produce a higher 
grade copper matte in a furnace 
using liquid fuel than we can pos- 
sibly produce in a furnace using 
coal. On the other hand, if it 
should be desirable to have a re- 
ducing atmosphere in matallurgi- : 



cal work, it is easy to change from 
an oxidizing atmosphere to a re- 
ducing one in an instant; by either 
choking the air inlet to the fur- 
nace, or increasing the flow of oil 
to the burner. This leads to the 
oil burner proper. 

There have probably been two 
thousand patents granted for oil- 
burners, each claiming remarkable, 
and even most surprising results. 
For instance: some inventors claim 
that their burners will generate 
hydrogen. When asked to ex- 
plain this, and how they expect to 
benefit the kind people by this 
most remarkable reaction, the 
usual answer Is, " the heat decom- 
poses the steam into oxygen and 
hydrogen ; and there you are." 
In their eagerness to praise their 
burners they forget that plus and 
minus balance fairly well in na- 
ture, and that it would take ex- 
actly the same amount of heat to 
disassociate water into its compe- 
nent parts, namely, hydrogen and 
oxygen, as would be generated by 
combining or burning the oxygen 
and hydrogen so generated, minus 



a liberal amount of beat wasted 
by radiation. 

When deciding to use liquid fuel, 
it is necessary to decide whether 
steam or compressed air shall 
be used as an atomizer. Let me 
call your attention to the fact that 
the use of compressed air nectsM- 
tates a compressor , and an ap- 
paratus for preheating the com- 
pressed air. This latter appendix 
is very much to be recommended, 
because as you know, in allowing 
compressed air to expand the 
temperature of the surrounding 
air will be lowered. A cold or 
nearly freezing temperature will 
not be beneficial in atomizing li- 
quid fuel preparatory to obtaining 
complete combustion. Steam, on 
the other hand, carries a certain 
amount of heat to the oil, and 
liquifies and even gasifies the same. 
Of course, all this pertains to 
plants on terra firma. On board 
a steamer it is different, where 
water has to be carried along, or 
sea water is to be distilled, in 



(Continued on page 6.) 



GOLD! 

Never Goes Begging 

It is always at par. You don't have to seek a market or 
discount your goods. You are not subject to the dictation 
or control of the trusts. Fort hese and many other reasons 
a good gold property is one of the best investments, and 
stock in a company having a gold property of proven 
merit, managed by men of honesty and mining ability, 
offers to the poor man one of the best avenues to 
independence. Such a proposition is the 

Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owning the Hudson group of mines in the Big Bug Dis- 



10 



trict, Arizona, surrounded by rich 
producing mines. To continue 
development a block of treasury 
stock is now being sold at 

Send for particulars. 



W. G. YOUNG & CO., 



CENTS 

PER SHARE 

Par Value $1.00 
Full Paid, 
Non-Assessable. 



Fiscal 
Agents 



628-630 Laughlin Bldg. 
BANK REFERENCES Los Angeles, Cal. 



» 



3" 



READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



IS THE BBS T g 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners' Association- 

W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bnsh 176. 

TERMS 

One Tear , $250 

Six Months ..J 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order fpr two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal., 
us second-class matter. 

FRIDAY.. NOVEMBER 21,1902 



The California Petroleum Miners' 
Association has is- 
Valuable sued a very valuable 
Bulletin bulletin, the third in 
the series. It con- 
tains the important and interesting 
paper, read by Dr. C. T. Deane, 
secretary of the association, before 
the eleventh annual convention 
of the Miners' Association, held 
this week in San Francisco on 
"The Use of Crude Petroleum 
from a Commercial Standpoint." It 
also contains the names of those 
persons and firms of San Francisco 
granted permission to use crude 
oil for fuel purposes, and the list 
of steamers, hailing from San 
Francisco, burning oil. There is 
also much other valuable matter. 
The bulletin can be obtained by 
writing Dr. Deane, at his office in 
the Mills building. 



An idea of how oil for fuel is gain- 
ing favor in the 
"Coals to eastern hemis- 

NeWCastle." phere is afforded 
by Manchester, 
the seat of England's great cotton 
manufactories. The London Pe- 
troleum, an oil publication, says: 

" It seems to us that Manchester 
has more quickly and clearly than 
any other part of the country 
gauged the opportunities offered 
by the commercial centers of the 
Midlands for the full development 
of a trade in liquid fuel. Through 
Manchester a number of com- 
panies have decided that the fuel 
business of the Midlands can be 
focused. Consequently, petroleum 
has become a real live question, 
and is reckoned among the most 
important commercial topics of 
the place. Nowhere else can we 
see so many signs of a spirited 
effort to grapple with the storage 
and distributing problems of the 
business. 

"All this is quite in keeping 
with the eternal fitness of things. 
Nothing is more natural than that 



Lancashire, chief home of the 
manufacturing classes, should wel- 
come a new industry that will 
feed its thousands of furnaces 
with a cheaper and a better fuel." 
That Manchester, situated so 
near the great coal mines of New- 
castle, should supersede that fuel 
with oil is most remarkable. It 
is literally almost a case of " carry- 
ing coals to Newcastle." 



UNDERGROUND FLOW. 



A Supreme Court Decision of 
Interest to Oil Man. 

Southern California having long 
since applied successfully for ir- 
rigation purposes all accessible 
surface waters, has been exploit- 
ing underground sources, and a 
crop of lawsuits has resulted. Tie 
courts have been called upon to 
decide an unusual and interesting 
issue between Riverside and San 
Bernardino counties, and the rul- 
ing of the Supreme court is of some 
concern to oil producers in that it 
decides the rights of underground 
flow. 

The Riverside Water company 
takes a great volume of water from 
artesian wells near San Bernardi- 
no, which is also supplied by ar- 
tesian wells situated higher up. 
When the Riverside wells were 
started, the flow in the San Ber- 
nardino wells ceased, or was 
greatly reduced, and the city 
of San Bernardino applied to the 
courts for an order to have the 
Riverside wells capped so that San 
Bernardino might retain the water 
which naturally belongs to it. 
The lower court refused the order 
on the showing of the petition, 
but the Supreme court has just 
reversed the decision and re- 
manded the case to be tried on its 
merits. 

The effect of the Supreme court's 
decision seems to be that if the 
trial court finds that the lower 
wells impair San Bernardino's 
supply they must be capped. The 
interests involved in tnis case are 
enormous. If the owner of lands 
on which artesian water is de- 
veloped can not sell the water to 
be taken to another's valley, 
where it would not naturally flow, 
a great part of the Riverside 
orange groves will be destroyed. 

The interesting question arises, 
how will this decision effect 
a possible issue between two ad- 
joining and rival oil claims? Sup- 
pose oil wells driven on a claim 
tap the flow from the wells en 
an older claim, would this water 
case decision be quoted as a pre- 
cedent, requiring the owners of 
the more recent claim to cap their 
wells? 



ANNUAL CONVENTION. 



Price Now Eighteen Cents. 

According to the Bakersfield 
Californian the price of oil can be 
said at the present date to be not 
lower than 18 cents per barrel. 
That is the figure for which the 
Standard is willing to take the 
product and pay spot cash for it. 
At the rate of advance noted dur- 
ing the past few months, it is not 
out of bounds to hope that by the 
new year or a little later, a price 
that will be, eminently satisfactory 
to the producer will prevail and 
still be within what, in compari- 
son with coal, the consumer can 
well afford to pay. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Rrportjse. 



(Continued from page 5.) 

which case I should prefer to use 
air under pressure. 

As the dimensions of metallur- 
gical furnaces are variable ones, 
you will readily understand that 
we need flames of many different 
sizes for our metallurgical tools. 
For instance, at Selby, the ex- 
treme lengths of flames used are 
eight inches and six feet. In the 
zinc retorts, which are our small- 
est furnaces, we need a flame of 
eight inches. In the large matt- 
ing furnace, 35'xi6' in the clear, 
we need a flame of six feet or even 
more in length. The burner has 
to be adapted to the furnace, and 
to the work to be performed. 
Hence you will find at metallur- 
gical establishments a great variety 
of burners, or at least a great va- 
riety of sizes of burners, and I 
know of no better all around bur- 
ner than the one formed of two 
concentric pipes, the smaller one 
being the oil pipe, and the larger 
one the steam carrier. By this ar- 
rangement the oil pipe is steam 
jacketed, and the temperature of 
the oil is raised to such a degree 
that its fluidity is very much in- 
creased, and part of the lighter 
oils become gases. All this tends 
to break up more or less the vis- 
cous oil into minute particles, 
which ignite readily when brought 
in contact with the oxygen of 
the surrounding atmosphere. 

The following advice to future 
users of oil as fuel may not be 
amiss in concluding this papar : 

First. By all means engage an 
expert to install your plant, and 
do not experiment yourselves, as 
it costs money to do so. 

Secondly. Do not use a mix- 
ture of different gravity oils. 

Thirdly. Do not use a mixture 
of heavy residues with light oils 
from the oil refineries, as this mix- 
ture w 11 not remain mixed. Oil 
refineries are very fond of mixing 
heavy residues with some light 
oils, thus producing an oil of the 
gravity corresponding to the one 
contracted for. 

When making a contract for 
liquid fuel insist that nowhere in 
the contract shall appear the words 
" fuel oil," but call for crude pe- 
troleum of a certain gravity, and 
insist, if possible, on getting the 
crude petroleum from wells pro- 
ducing very near the same gravity 
of oil. Suppose you contract for 
"fuel oil" of, say, 20 gravity; (and 
not for "crude petroleum") It is 
possible, and also probable, that 
you will receive a fuel oil of 20° 
gravity, but you will not always 
receive crude petroleum at 20 
gravity. The refiner has a perfect 
right by this contract for "fuel 
oil" and not "crude petrolem," to 
send you a mixture of residuum 
of, say, io° gravity and a distillate 
of crude oil of 35° gravity in such 
proportions that the mixture will 
show 20° gravity. This mixture 
will be pumped into your storage 
tanks, and in a very short time the 
heavy and light ingredients will 
separate. At the bottom of your 
storage tank you will finds lumps 
as big as 10" to 12"- In diameter; 
and on top you will find the light 
oil, or distillate. These lumps, 
which the refiners term B. S., (I 
refer you to them for an explana- 
tion of this, to me an entirely new 
and unknown chemical formula), 
will enter your pipes and burners, 
and will stop your oil's system up' 
very effectively. Another point 



that should be observed in making 
contracts for crude petroleum is 
the percentage of moisture and 
grit allowed in the oil. Two per- 
cent is a liberal allowance to be 
made to the seller, and if the crude 
oil contains more than: two percent 
water and dirt a proportionate de- 
duction should be made from the 
oil received. 

; A very simple test for the de- 
termination of the grit and water 
in crude oil is the following: Place 
in a graduated tube .01. cubic cen- 
timeter of the oil to be tested; add 
to this .01 cubic centimeter of gas- 
oline; shake this mixture well, 
and let it remain in a fairly warm 
place for twenty-four hours. By 
that time the water and sand, be- 
ing heavier than the gasoline and 
crude oil, will have settled to the 
bottom. By counting the cubic 
centimeters that represent the 
water and grit, which are easy to 
be distinguished from the oil, you 
have the percentage without any 
figuring. 

During the last few years I 
have been repeatedly approached 
by parties asking me why I do not 
use oil in the blast furnace, and 
the only answer I can give them 
is the following: Solid carbon 
plays a very Important role, es- 
pecially In the upper level of the 
blast furnace shaft. Its function, 
especially with the fine ores, is 
largely to limber up the charge 
and allow the flow of gases to 
penetrtfe the charge evenly; be- 
sides incandescent carbon has cer- 
tain functions to perform in the 
blast furnace, which are of a 
chemical nature, and which need 
not be discussed in this paper. If 
coke 01 charcoal should be entirely 
replaced by oil in the blast frr- 
nace, the blast furnace charge 
would very likely become too 
dense to allow the combustion 
gases to escape freely. Besides, 
it seems to me, there would be 
considerable danger from explo- 
sions if oil should be used as a 
fuel in blast furnaces. However, 
I think it may be possible to re- 
place part of the solid carbon fuel 
with liquid fuel, but am not pre- 
pared to state at this time what 
percentage of liquid fuel could be 
used, or what mechanical arrange- 
ments should be introduced for 
the use of liquid fuel in the blast 
furnaces. 

Alfred von dkr Ropp, 
Supt. Selby S. & L. Co. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and BoNDSunderwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at Its Home Office. 

To Whom It May Concern. 

Boulder, Colo., Oct. 6, 1902. 
This is to certify that O. H. Jones, the 
oil locator of Los Angeles, Cal., located 
a well for the Otero Oil and Gas com- 
pany in the Boulder, Colo., oil fields in 
May, 1902; that the same was drilled in- 
to oil September 1, at a depth of 1,765 
feet; that since September 3 we have 
been pumping 100 barrels per day. This 
was not near any other producing well. 
F. J. CRETCHER, Director. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One ol the 
Greatest Industries In the Far West 



ALASKA. 

The Alaska Development company has 
bonded 70.000 acres of Alaska oil lands 
to an Bnglish syndicate for £2,500,000, 
on the condition that the syndic ilc shall 
spend $50,000 a year in development 
work. Oil was struck on the lands at a 
depth of 220 feet, the liquid shooting 
forty feet over the top of the derrick. 
The lands lie in the Copper river region. 

ARIZONA. 

Phoenix people are bestirring them- 
selves to promote prospecting for oil in 
that section. A local company has been 
formed to further prospecting near the 
Camelback mountains, twelve miles from 
Phoenix. Near Florence the indications 
of striking oil soon are considered favor 
able. At that point a prospecting well 
has been sunk to a depth of 160 feet. 

CONTRA COSTA. 

The Berkeley Crude Oil company has 
been drilling on well No. 2 for two 
months, but has only got down about 
350 feet. 

FRESNO. 

There is more talk in the Coalinga 
held of the necessity of a pipe-line than 
anything else, and it is said that the 
Standard has agreed to lay a line to its 
main Bakersfield line, 18 miles, provided 
the field will guarantee a supply of at 
least 1,000 barrels a day of refining oil, 
similar to the 29 oil of the California o 1 
fields, ltd., is getting from four of its 
wells. When this amount of production 
is assured there will be no further lack 
of pipe-line facilities. 



The Clark refining company is run- 
ning full time, turning out distillates, 



•sphaltum and briquettes. The latter 
branch seems to promise large returns. 

Among the companies operating at 
the fields the chief activity is reported 
at the Monte Ciisto property. 

Another blow-out at the McKittrick 
i camp has slightly decreased the produc- 
tion of its wells. The damage is not 
serious, however, and repairs will be 
completed shortly. 

The Staudard has began the construc- 
tion of three large earth reservoirs for 
storage purposes in the Kern River field. 
A close estimate makes its storage ca- 
pacity here 128,562,500 gallons. 

The Standard Oil company has a large 
camp of men at work constructing its 
immense reservoirs, which cover some 
350 feet of ground, and are sixteen feet 
in depth with a capacity of 385,000 bar- 
rels. 

The Peerless has decided to renew 
development on a large scale, and is 
about to begin a large water well for the 
purpose of drilling. It is said that it 
has agreed to furnish the Standard a 
much greater quantity of oil than it is 
now supplying. 



The Lion Oil compony has just pur- 
chased half a mile of 3:inch pipe with 
which it will connect its wells with the 
terminal of the railroad at Sunset. 
When its pipe-line is completed, it will 
begin marketing oil. It is reported to 
have closed a number of contracts which 
will net the company 18 cents a barrel at 
the well. 

A prospestor brought into Bakersfield 
a black, greasy piece of rock. Upon 
careful examination, it proved to be a 
piece of pitchblende, from which urani- 
um, the base of radium, is extracted. 
The metal is worth $300,000 an ounce. 



Investigation is now being made to ascer- 
tained whether there is any considerable 
quantity of this metal where the sample 
came from. 

The Kern Oil company is about to be- 
gin development on us property of 160 
acres at Kern River in the Immediate 
future. This property Is on 28-38. The 
company sold three hundred acres of its 
land to the Associated Oil company but 
will not await action by the latter but 
will proceed on its own development and 
begin the shipment and sale of oil at 
the earliest possible moment. 

The Maricopa Oil company has secured 
permission from the supervisors to con- 
struct a pine-line along the count) road 
from Maricopa camp on section 1-11-24 
to the terminus of the Sunset railroad. 
The distance is in the neighborhood of 
one and one-half miles and the intention 
1 is to deliver oil at the shipping point until 
such time as more direct communication 
is opened up to the markets for the pre- 
troleum product. The company will 
shortly build a 4-inch pipe-line and by 
this means deliver its product at the rail- 
way. 

The Societe Anonyme Beige des 
Petroles de Kern (Californie), better 
known as the Belgium Oil company, 
will next week begin to ship oil to San 
Francisco from its wells Nos. 1 and 2 in 
the McKittrick district. No. 1 was com- 
pleted last March and No. 2 struck oil 
only a week ago. A conservative esti- 
mate by the management places the 
yield of each well at 150 barrels, or one 
carload a day. The crude product 
will at first be marketed for fuel, but 
later on it will be sold to the refineries as 
it contains a high percentage of lubri- 
cating oil. As soon as the two produc- 
ing wells are thoroughly completed, the 
pumps set going smoothly, and the 
weekly shipment of two carloads of oil 
steadily maintained, the company will 
drill other wells thoroughly developing 
its McKittrick holdings. 



The Williams Asphalt Mastic com- 
pany has been incorporated. Principal 
place of business, San Francisco. Di- 
rectors: H. F. Williams, W. H. Wors- 
wick, H. J. Leric, W. R. Williams and 
W. H. Coke. Capital stock, $100,000; 
subscribed, $500. 



T. and L. Robinson, who have beeu 
sinking a two-iuch well on their raucb 011 
the northwest of 5-22, 29 ouih 

of llauford. have met with thribble suc- 
cess The new well is 272 feet in depth 
and a si iil-out f 200. They have a flow of 
water that rolls out 18 inches above the 
casing, and they also have a good supph 
of natural gas. 

LOS ANGKLKS. 

The Consolidated Crude has leased its 
properties to Allen Craig, the drilling 
contractor. 

The Murphy company, \\ hittier, is 
producing 1,200 barrels daily, with some 
of its Hells capped. In four weeks it 
shipped ico carloads of oil. 

A fire November 19 damaged the Her- 
cules Oil Refining company s plont $25,- 
000. Twenty-five hundred barrels of dis- 
tillate and 500 barrels of asphaKuin were 
destroyed. The origin of the fire was be- 
lieved to be due to the dripping of the 
rain on the hot liquid in an asphaltuni 
tank, causing an explosion. 

NKVADA. 

The narrow-gauge railroad running be- 
tween Colfax aud Nevada city, is to use 
oil fuel on its locomotives. 

NEW MEXICO. 

A telegram from Santa Rosa, New 
Mexico, states that oil has been struck 
in the well of the O. K. Crude Oil com- 
pany, and that when the water is cased 
off the well will contain 100 feet of oil. 

ORANGE. 

The 6anta Fe has commenced work 
on its thirty-ninth well. It is located on 
the hill b^ick of the Fullerton Oil com- 
pany's property and due south of No. 
36, which is now drilling with every pros- 
pect of being a good producer. 

SAN DIEGO. 

The mayor has signed an ordinance 
authorizing the purchase of aparatus 
for sprinkling the streets of San Diego 
with oil. The plan has never been tried 
there. When an effort was made to pro- 
vide for use of oil instead of water on the 
streets several years ago, much an- 
tagonism to the movement was found to 
exist, and it was abandoned. 



THE 



ELK HORN 
CONSOLIDATED 

OIL COMPANY 



J. G. JURY, President J. M. BOTTS, Vice-President 

H. B. WORCESTER, Secretary and Treasurer 



Capitalization, $2,500,000 1 Present Selling Price of 



Par Value of Shares, $1.00 f Stock 



30 Cents 



Owns 1,400 Acres of Oil Land in Sunset, 
Midway and McKittrick Districts. 



Main Office, 470, 471 and 472 PARROTT BUILDING 



San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



SAN MATBO. 

The Fountain Oil company has erected 
another rig on the southeast corner of 
its big tract of oil lands and will start to 
drilling at once. 

Mr. Guiberson has put in a new gaso- 
meter at the Purissima wells to utilize 
some of the abundant natural gas for 
domestic purposes. 

Seepage and gas have been en- 
countered in the well of the Pilarcitos 
Oil company at a depth of 300 feet. 
Drilling is still going on at a good rate. 

Messrs. Botts & Parker of the High 
Gravity Oil company are steadily at 
work on well No. 3 and are down to a 
good depth. This well is in a very 
promising location and when oil is struck 
in it a tremendous flow is expected. 

Sallee, Hayne and Guiberson are 
down some 1,200 feet on well No. 5, but 
have not yet struck a flow of oil although 
this hole is only a short distance from 
one of their best producing wells. This 
is accounted for by the incline of the 
formation. 

It is impossible to obtain the exact 
facts in regard to the strike made in the 
well of the Wisconsin company. It is 
kaown, however, that a large body of 
oil has been struck and that all the tank- 
age obtainable is being utilized. Presi- 
dent J E. Kerr will say nothing except 
that matters are in a very satisfactory 
condition. No one is allowed at the well, 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The Pinal Oil and Development com- 
pany is reported to have 80 feet of oil in 
its 1, 270-foot well on land close to that of 
the Western Union. 

The discovery has been made in the 
Summerland Oil district, that a great 
amount of damage has been done and is 
being done to oil wharves by the teredo. 
The wells there are sunk through the 
water of the oceans from long, and, in 
many cases, none too stoutly built 
wharves. It is the piling of these 
wharves that the teredo is attacking. 
One oil company has started the work 
of repairing the damage. Some piles 
were so eaten away that the weight of 
the pile driver snapped them off. 
Several other wharves are in urgent need 



of repair and one operator is talking of 
putting in an iron wharf. 

The refinery of the Columbian com- 
pany is now running. The tanks, hold- 
ing 1,500 barrels, are kept full of Sum- 
merland oil, and the asphalt well is now 
being pumped to its fullest capacity. 
The deep asphalt well is now going 
down, and work has been begun on an- 
other hand-dug shaft which will reach a 
very large deposit of liquid asphalt lo- 
cated near the refinery. This deposit is 
known to lie at a depth not exceeding 
200 feet, and has previously been struck 
by drillers in search of oil who were 
forced to abandon the well on account of 
the rapid accumulation of asphalt. The 
refinery, when worked to its full capa- 
city, will soon be turning out 40 tons of 
refined asphalt a day, besides a large 
quantity of lubricating oil. The number 
of products will be steadily increased. 



struck some time ago in Tehama county 
at Tuscan Springs. 

TEXAS. 

The Spindle Top is now producing 
52,000 barrels of oil daily. Many wells 
that are good producers, which have 
been idle on account of the gas being so 
troublesome, have recently been placed 
in producing attitude, thereby increas- 
ing largely the total daily output. 



The 



SANTA CLARA. 
Orchard Crude Oil company, 



drilling on its fourth well near L-os Gatos. 
has reached a depth of over 1,000 feet. 
The drill is now in clay and much of a 
formation similar to that encountered in 
the McKittrick field just previous to 
striking oil. A large interest in this 
company has bnt recently been pur- 
chased by some experienced oil men 
from Kern River field, and they feel 
very much pleased over the indications, 
and are certain oil will soon be struck. 

SOLANO. 

The Solano Prospecting and Develop- 
ing company has been organized with a 
capital stock of $25,000, all of which has 
been subscribed. The object of the com- 
pany is to develop the Rochester Oil com- 
pany's land for natural gas and salt. 
The latter company sank a well 1,800 
feet, finding no oil but striking an abund- 
ant flow of gas and salt water. 

TEHAMA. 

At Corning, W. N. Woodson has con- 
tracted for a 1,200-foot hole to be driven 
in the expectation of striking a flow of 
artesian water, gas or oil. If a strikeis 
not made at the depth stated, the hole 
will be sunk deeper. The money is up, 
the contract made, and work was com- 
menced Monday moruing of this week. 
Artesian water and natnral gas were 



and 
ad- 



The Electric Road. 

The affairs of the Bakersfield 
Ventura Railroad company have 
vanced so far that it has been decided to 
adopt the block system, which means 
that the line will be trolleyless. The 
surveys are all made, the rights of way 
from Ventura and Hueneme have been 
secured, the work ef tracklaying will be 
begun by New Year's, and it is expected 
that the line will be in partial operation 
inside of eight months. The road will 
be 165 miles long from Ventura to 
Bakersfield besides several miles of sid- 
ing. . 

Personals. 

George Quarre, manager of the Bel- 
gian Oil company, left the city Wednes- 
day for McKittrick on his regular month- 
ly inspection of the company's oil wells. 

C. W. Ayres, president of the Colum- 
bia and Crescent Oil company, was in 
the city this week to attend the Knight 
Templars' banquet and to purchase ma- 
chinery for a new refinery to be erected 
by the company at Carpinteria. 

R. H. Herron, of the R. H. Herron 
company, was up from Los Angeles this 
week as a delegate from the southern 
part of the State to the eleventh annual 
convention of the California Miners' As- 
sociation. 

A Snap 

if taken advantage of at once. 

A Standard oil well boring out- 
fit complete. Now situated in the 
Colusa field for sale cheap or 
open to other propositions of great 
advantage to the right party. 
For particulars addrers, P. O., 
Box No. 132, Corning, Cal. 



Plowing Asphalt. 

In the Indian Territory, where 
all sorts of things are done that 
were never heard of elsewhere, 
they are plowing asphalt, says the 
Kansas City Star. Eighteen miles 
southeast of the Comanche, in the 
Chickasaw country, six strapping 
Missouri mules are hitched to a 
big plow every day and long fur- 
rows of asphalt are turned. It is 
the same kind of a plow the 
farmers use who break ground in 
the blackjack country, and the 
asphalt is the kind got by blasting 
on the island of Trinidad. The 
mules are plowing in the center 
of a deposit one-third larger than 
the asphalt deposits on Trinidad. 
Wells have been dug to the depth 
of 100 feet. Strata of asphalt of 
varying thicknesses have been en- 
countered to whatever depth the 
wells have been sunk. 



Oil Saved Dollars. 

In the days when coal was used 
for fuel, the Santa Fe tug in tak- 
ing a barge from the company's 
slip in this city to Point Rich- 
mond consumed between $6 and 
$8 in coal. Now that oil is the 
fuel expense for making a trip 
under like conditions is less than 
$1. This statement is made on 
the authority of the engineer. 



State Dredgers to Use Oil. 

The two State dredgers em- 
ployed in San Francisco are to be 
fitted up as oil-burners at an early 
date. The new dredger now be- 
ing constructed, and which is to 
be completed early in the coming 
year, will also be an oil-burner. 



Keep Your Eye on 
Halfmoon Bay and 
you'll soon see some 
Oil Stocks Soaring 

€) flftVr^ l-^Slf* Write us for maps, pic- 

+~*KF\J T W m. CJ.1 • tures, literature, etc. 

The Debenture Surety Co. a80 Bush ?V Auis B,d ^' 

(incorporated) * San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A BIG DEAL IN OIL. 



The Western Union Gives an Option fop 
$1,250,000. 



The Pacific OH and Transportation Company Kuys 

9,000 out of 10,000 Shares of the 

Stock at $125 per Share. 



Probably the most important 
trade in oil in California since the 
sale of the Petroleum Develop- 
ment company's Kern river prop- 
erty to the Santa Fe railway sev- 
eral months ago, is the transfer of 
the entire holdings of the Western 
Union to the Pacific Oil and Trans- 
portation company of San Fran- 
cisco. The actual cash involved is 
$1,425,000. 

Details of the transaction were 
made public by J. S. Slauson, pres- 
ident of the Western Union Oil 
company, who had given William 
Matson of the Pacific Oil and 
Transportation company the op- 
tion to purchase 9,000 shares of 
the entire capitalization which is 
10,000 shares. 

This option was given by eight 
of the nine principal stockholders 
of the Western Union Oil com- 
pany, including J. S. Slauson, H. 
Jevne, W. H. Hellman, J. D. Bick- 
nell, W. H. Perry, A. H. McKay, 
H. W. Wollacott and Thomas 
Hughes, who pooled their stock, 
granting the option until April 1, 
1903, the price agreed upon being 
$125 per share, or at the rate of 
$1,250,000 for the entire holdings 
of the Western Union. The only 
large stockholder not in the pool 
is J. D. Hooker, who preferred to 
retain his interest in the company. 

In addition to the stock of the 
Western Union a similar option 
was granted the same interests 
on the capital stock of the Los 
Flores Land and Oil company, 
practically owned by the same 
parties. The property of this 
company adjoins that of the West- 
ern Union, and the consideration 
named is $175,000. 

The holdings of the Western 
Union Oil company consist of the 
principal oil-producing territory 
of the Santa Maria oil field in 
Santa Barbara county — eight pro- 
ducing wells and many valuable 
contracts. 

Captain William Matson, Presi- 
dent of the Pacific Oil and Trans- 
portation company, confirms the 
report that his company has an op- 
tion on the Western Union. He 
states that the oil company now 
has eight flowing wells producing 
1,500 barrels a day, and that the 
number will be increased to eigh- 
teen by April first. 

The Pacific Oil and Transporta- 
tion company has a pipe-line 
thirty-nine miles long, tapping the 
oil fields and terminating at the 
seaboard at Alcatraz Landing. So 
the purchasingcompany is already 
well-equipped to handle the out- 
put, and will not be hampered in 
its operations for lack of transpor- 
tation facilities. It will in no wiseJ 



be dependent upon railroad com- 
panies and tank lines. 

While the cash has not yet been 
paid over, the option extending 
to April 1, 1903, the sale is as 
certainly made as though the cash 
had actually been paid. 



ON THE ATLANTIC, 



Passenger Steamers Beginning 
to Burn Oil. 

Ship-owners on the Atlantic 
have not been so quick to super- 
sede coal with oil as fuel as have 
been the owners of vessels em- 
ployed in the Pacific ocean trade. 
But the Atlantic folks are awak- 
ening to the economy and advan- 
tage of using crude oil for fuel 
instead of coal. 

This is evidenced by the fact 
that theStandard Oil company has 
placed an order abroad for twenty- 
one tank-carrying steamers, and 
another great fleet of steamships 
for the oil-carrying trade between 
New York and Texas is under- 
way in the shipyards at Brooklyn. 
One company is now building 
there three tank steamers with a 
capacity of 22,500 barrels of oil. 
Two other vessels are being trans- 
formed by the same company, 
which will have a capacity of , r o,- 
000 barrels each. A second com- 
pany is transfering into oil-carry- 
ing vessels at the same yards two 
steamships of 1.450 tons burden. 
The British Queen, which was 
nearly destroyed by the Hoboken 
fire, is now near y ready to carry 
40,000 barrels of oil. Shipowners 
are at a loss to explain the sud- 
den demand for oil-carrying craft, 
but generally ascribe it to a move- 
ment to go into the Texas trade 
and a tendency to equip Atlantic 
steamers with oil-burning fur- 
naces. 

The first steamship consuming 
oil for fuel to leave an eastern 
American port started out from 
Brooklyn, November 10th. She 
is the converted tank steamer, 
Julia Luckenbach, of 4,000 tons 
capacity. Her fuel capacity was 
40,000 gallons of crude oil and 150 
tons of coal. The latter was taken 
to be used in case of emergency, 
and was required by the under- 
writers. It will be employed in 
the donkey engines for lifting 
deck appliances, which will be 
equipped with oil engines next 
trip. She will reach Sabine Pass 
in six days, going about 14 knots 
an hour, to bring back a cargo of 
26,000 barrels of Texas fuel oil 
to deliver to a gas company on 
East Eleventh street, New York. 

The Red Star steamship Ken- 
sington claims the distinction of 
being the first passenger steam- 
ship that ever crossed the ocean 
with oil for fuel under one of her 
boilers. The Kensington left 



Antwerp October 25th and reach- 
ed her pier at Vetey street. New 
York, Nuvember 4th. She carried 
133 cabin and 666 steerage 
senders. Other vessels have cross- 
ed the Atlantic with crude oil for 
fuel, but they have been exclus- 
ively oil-carrying vessels. 



A GREAT SAVING. 



Oil for Fuel to be Used nil Over, 
the Sante Fc. 

A Sante Fe official, in speaking 
of the economy of using oil for fuel 
on the railroad system, says: 

" On our gulf division alone, the 
saving being made is at the rate of 
about $300,000 per annum, and, 
with the steady increase of the 
number of locomotives equipped 
for oil burning, we expect during 
the coming year to secure an econ- 
omy on this division alone of over 
$500,000. 

" For our California lines we 
havs a long time contract for crude 
oil with the Kern river companies 
at a price considerably below that 
now quoted for oil. Besides this, 
the development of our own oil 
property is progressing satisfac- 
torily, and our savings on the coast 
lines will be as much or more than 
that on the Gulf division. The 
service that has been secured by 
the use of oil has for the most 
part greatly exceeded our expec- 
tations, and it would not surprise 
me if oil ultimately became the fuel 
of the entire system." 

The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



A Good Run. 

Although Tim Spellacy has been 
defeated foi the office of railroad 
commissioner in a district hope- 
lessly Republican he made a most 
creditable showing, and his vote 
must be highly gratifying to him. 
His majority in Kern county was 
by far the largest ever given to a 
candidate for a State office In 
Kern. 



i 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A BONANZA 
INVESTMENT 



The Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refin= 
ing Company, 

of California, has the largest and most valuable deposit 
of LIQUID ASPHALT yet discovered in this country; 
has its own REFINERY of over 400 barrels daily ca- 
pacity, wh'ch was started up on November 1st, and as 
the asphalt produced contains several by-products of 
great commercial value, the company should be able to 
earn and pay very heavy dividends, in fact, so large as 
to warrant the stock advancing to par in the next few 
weeks, and probably to several hundred per cent pre- 
mium by the first of the new year. The stock is now 
selling at only $% CENTS PER SHARE (I45 per thou- 
sand) which is just 45 cents on the dollar, and the 
FIRST QUARTERLY DIVIDEND HAS BEEN 
PROMISED FOR JANUARY 1ST. Invest now and 
have your stock share in the first dividend. Write or 
call at once for reports, photographs of the refinery and 
the fullest information. 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 



2 K1LBY ST., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

November 19, 1902. 
Dullness has characterized the Ex- 
change for the past week, and only a 
small business has been done in either 
oil stocks or local securities. 

With one exception — Peerless — the 
quotations on oil stocks stand almost un- 
changed from a week ago. Peerless has 
slowly but steadily advanced, and {9.00 
is now freely bid, with f 10.00 asked. A 
few sales have been made at $9.25 and as 
high as I9.50. This company, unlike 
others, has from time to time issued to 
' its stockholders full and complete re- 
ports of its work in the field, including 
its production and deliveries, together 
with a balance sheet showing its assets 
and liabilities. There are companies- 
lots of them — whose directors for reasons 
best known to themselves, are not par- 
ticularly anxious to throw their books 
open to the public, but there are others 
who have nothing to fear, and who 
might — and undoubtedly would — inspire 
confidence in the public by rendering 
monthly or quarterly statements of their 
field operations and financial condition. 
A word to the wise is sufficient. 

Home is slightly lower, several lots 
(including one of 1,000 shares on 
Monday) selling at $2.75. There has 
been considerable dealing in Monte Cris- 
ta at $i-7'/i, with a fewsalesat fr.jo. 

It looks at present as though holders 
of certain stocks wishing to realize had 
made all the concessions they care to, 
and rather than make further sacrifice 
intend to hold on to them. At the same 
time many of the would-be purchasers 
seem to think that "bed-rock" has not 
yet been reached. Which side of the 
question is the right one, time alone will 
prove. 

Trading in local securities during the 
week has been of small volume. Sugar 
stocks continue firm. 



Wanted 

5,000 burners by a California 
refinery for a superior grade of 
stove distillate. Submit proposi- 
tions to P. O. Box 427, Bakers- 
field, Cal. 

California Stock and OH 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November 19: 
CLAIRMONT. 

400 at $ 15 $ 60 00 

FOUR. 

1,000 at 50 500 00 

HANFORD. 

1 at 87 (S90) 87 00 

HOME OIL. 

75 5,775 06 

80 1,960 00 



2,100 at 
700 at 

600 at 

4,400 at 

600 at 



1,000 at 

300 at 
2,015 at 



50 at 
50 at 



300 at 
100 at 



JUNCTION. 

09 54 00 

08 352 00 

10 60 00 

MONARCH. 

17 ■ '■ 170 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 

1 10 330 00 

1 07^ 2,166 12 

PEERLESS. 

9 25 (S 30) 462 50 

9 50 475 00 

STERLING. 

I 52 >£ 457 50 

1 52'A tS 30) 152 50 



THIRTY-THREE. 
10 at 7 50 



75 00 



13,526 Shares Amount {13,136 62 

ABBEY LAND & IMP. CO. 

no at 1 10 121 00 

ALASKA PACKERS. 

5 at 161 00 805 00 

HONOKAA SUGAR. 

10 at 13 go I35O0 

HONOLULU SUGAR. 

25 at 22 00 550 00 

NORTHERN CAL. POWER CO. 

50 at 8 00 400 00 

PAAUHAU SUGAR. 

60 at 16 00 960 00 

SPRING VALLEY WATER. 

30 at 85 25 2,567 50 

10 at 85 50 855 00 



300 Shares 



Amount $6,393.50 



Subscribe for the Pacific[Oh 
Reporter. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
E. I,. CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. EWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building, Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Building, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, S. F. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

LOMA PRIETA PRUNE RANCH COMPANY, 
Location and principal place of business 
San Francisco, California. Location of ranch. 
Monterey County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at the meeting of the 
Board of Directors held on the 10th day of Nov- 
ember, iqo2, an assessment of five ($5.00) dollars 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immed ately in United 
States Gold Coin, at the office of ihe Secretaiy, 
3331 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 10th day of December, 
1902, will be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Fric'ay, the 9th day of 
January, 1903, to pf.y the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

FRANK MORTON, Secretary. 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write J. D. Johnston, 

Newport, R. I. 



Fishing Tools 




PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

Largest Supply of Fishing Tools | No other company has all the odd 
in California Kept for Rent. | sizes as we have. 



Phone, Black 1071, 



BAKBRSFIBLD, CAL. 



JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ, 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 385 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California OH Stocks: 

"Home," paying monthly dividends of T% cents per share. 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"United Tonopah" 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Lightner, " paying monthly dividends of 5 cents per share.' 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Write to the undersigned for information regarding Oil and 
Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, returning 10 
percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

331 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench ^^iw" 1 ^ 



bits in drilling stem boxes 




Djilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



W. E. YOULE 




CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil Lands and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
iog for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Present Address; 

Arbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



FACIFIC OIL RBPORTBK 



RUSSIAN PRTROLEUfld 

The Yield Greater than that <>l 
the United States. 

Since the year 1897, Russia has 
produced more petroleum than the 
United States, according to the 
United States Report on Mineral 
Resources for 1901. Beginning 
with 1897, lne Russian production 
has been increasing by an average 
of over 12 percent each year to tuc 
close of i.,ot. In round numbers, 
the figures of production in bar- 
rels for the two countries are as 
follows: 
Tbak. v. Potto statu 

1897 54,000,000 60,000,000 

1898 62,000,000 55,000,000 

1899 66.000,000 57,000,000 

1900 76,000,000 64,000,000 

1901 85,000,060 69,000,000 



II 



Total o4;!,ooo,ooo J05.000.000 

The average annual increase 
during the five years for Russia 
has been 12.57 percent; for the 
United States, 2.89 percent — there 
having been a small decrease in 
the production of the United 
States in 1897, and a larger de- 
crease in 1898. 

The facilities for handling the 
large Russian production are at 
present crude, costly and waste- 
ful. The markets are far away 
from the production. The main 
foreign shipping port, at Batum, 
on the Black Sea, is separated by 
mountain chains from the chief 
center of production, Baku, on the 
Caspian Sea. To bring the oil to 
the seaboard, 400 miles of rail- 
road must be traveled to the ter- 
minus of the pipe-line, and then 
160 miles still remain before reach- 
ing Batoum. The capacity of the 
pipe-line is almost double the ca- 
pacity of the railroad, so that the 
amount taken to Batoum depends 
upon the capacity of the railroad. 
The Volga river is an outlet for 80 
percent of the production, and 
reaches many miles Into the heart 
of the Russian empire. But the 
Volga is frozen up for several 
months in the year, and is subject 
to months of low water stages in 
the summer and fall. 

The total exports of petroleum, 
crude and refined, from Russia to 
foreign ports in 1901 were 428,- 
657,210 gallons, or 40-33 percent of 
the exports of petroleum from the 
United States in 1901, which 
amounted to 1,062,750,306 gallons, 
valued at nearly $71,500,000. 

The very great difference be- 
tween the petroleum of the United 
States and Russia is shown in the 
statistics of refined petroleum. Of 
the world's total production of 
crude petroleum in 1901, 165,385,- 
733 barrels, the United States pro- 
duced 69,389,1.94 barrels, or 4.1.97 
percent, and Russia produced 85,- 
168,556 barrels, or 51.49 percent; 
and yet of the total production of 
refined petroleum of all grades in 
1901, estimated at 1,500,000,000 
of all countries, the United States 
produced 911,120944 gallons, or 
60.7 percent, and Russia 414,122,- 
990 gallons, or only 27.7 percent. 

[THE MIDLAND PACIFIC. 

$2,000,000 In Bonds Will Be 
Taken in New York. 

E. P. Vining, who early became 
Interested in the project, going 
over the proposed route person- 
ally, has been in New York for 
some time, and lately received as- 
surances that $2,000,000 will be 
Invested in bonds of the company, 
payments to be made in ten-month- 
ly installments, beginning ne~xt 
February. Says the Californian : 



This promise is made dependent 
upon a freight guarantee of 5,000 
{barrels of oil per day, and recent- 
ly this has been secured. The 
companies nesting aliout the dis- 
COvety nude by the Monarch, to- 
gether with others in that portion 
of the Sunset field, have formed 
I an association for combined deliv- 
ery of oil, and they will set over 
to go by way of the Midland about 
; three thousand barrels, or enough 
to make up the amount required. 
Still, the agents of the Midland 
do not propose to rest content with 
all that is necessary but will en- 
deavor to obtain further shipping 
contracts, which they can undoubt- 
edly do. The peculiar advantage 
to be gained by the Sunset pro- 
ducers Is likely to cause the com- 
panies of that district to encourage 
a road to the coast to the fullest 
extent, for in tiie event that such 
a road is built, their position in 
the market will become almost 
commanding. They will be able 
to deliver oil at a price which pro- 
ducers in other fields cannot touch. 



Opportunities in a Lifetime 

Headquarters School, Government and 
Oil Lands in California. 

taken from t6o to 640 acre*. 

L^iruis abound in all counties in State. They te- 

■ luire no tuniiition. as to resilience on land or 

it loo, mill carry nil minerals *nd deposit*. 

I j.s mi acre. I PortnOtl b»Ti 

Ivcrn made 111 all tlie California oil district* Now 

i» your opBOrtnoUy. School land* arc adapted to 

Harming. Hatching. Timber Lands and are the 

rnpest Speculation in the United 

States. Send stamp for Land Book and Circular*. 

Hine proven oil lands to offer Correspondence 

solicited Kttahlished 1885. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



If You are going East call at the 



Oil Dividend Declared. 



The Four Oil company declared 
a dividend of i cent per share, 
amounting to $3,000, payable Nov- 
ember 15th. 



Vl*MiVWWWAViVVWlVlM 



NEARLY 200,000 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters * 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use 11 Smith .Pre- 
miers. 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers, 

TheViavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine A"ssociat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers 

Gunnison. Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge. 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Excldsive Pacific Coast Dealers, 

IIO Montgemery St. San Francisco, 

Branch Stores: 

Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



A. S. COOPER, C. L, 1. E. 

219 Crocker Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 

A. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the largest Stock. Our price* are 

Equitable. 

Tel. Main. 1133. 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar lop 
Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 

B. O. MCCORMICK. T. H. GOODMAN, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United states and 

— .^-.^.— ■— Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



/CYGNET PETROLliDM CO 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location— Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. I, Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 
■ Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
12,850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 30 producing wells. Officers and directors - 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
cipal office, Potomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital $500,000 

Treasury stock $350,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company, Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Leased 6000 acres asphaltum land in Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Falkenberg, president; M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawson, R P Chase, Col E J 
Ensign. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 855 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 



San Francisco, Cal 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



The Portable Rig which his placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
1 ecomuiended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GiIt=Edged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous . 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 



ACRES 6000 ACRES 



of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected. Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 
. No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise .must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton Cpresent price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, 



Stock Nonassessable. 
= $350,000 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in AH Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 




American Steel & Wire Co, 



CHICAGO HEW YORK. WORCESTER DENVER SAM FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 

American Steel Wire Pumping Line 

American Steel Wire Tubing Line 

American Steel Wire Sand Line 
Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 



PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 

CITY SALES OFFICE 

8 and IP Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEO. H. ISM0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. lO 



AGENCIES . 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

E. <R. ELDREDGE, Sales Agent o. D. COI/VIN, Sales Agent 




CHAS. C. MOORE & CO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



Engineers complete power plants 

Q *U W* fcj Machinery ot the Highest Grade 




Geipel Steam Traps 

Always Closed when Steam 

is in the Brass Pipe. Always 

Open when Water is in the 

Brass Pipe. 

Guaranteed Positive in its 

Action. 




Main Office 

San Francisco, Cal. 

32 First Street 



Branch Offices 
NEW YORK 1303 Havemeyer Bldfi 
LOS ANGELES 103 S. Broadway 
SEATTLE 318 Second Ave. So 




Vol. 4. No. 4. 



Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., NOVEMBER 28, 1902. 



Price 10 Cents. 



OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING REQUIRED 

To Drill, Equip and Operate OIL, GAS and WATER WELLS 
BOILERS, ENGINES, DRILLING and FISHING TOOLS 
MANILA & WIRE ROPE, CASING, TUBING, DRIVE & LINE PIPE 

COMBINATION OUTFITS 

INTERCHANGEABLE FROM STANDARD CABLE DRILLING TO THE 
HYDRAULIC ROTARY SYSTEM, SHIFT MADE IN A FEW MOMENTS 
FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER. 

CABLE SYSTEM FOR HARD ROCK FORMATIONS, HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
FOR QUICKSAND & CLAY, COMBINATION OUTFITS for any condition. 



y 





j 




IMPERIAL WORKS, Oil City, Pa., one of the OIL WELL SUPPLY CO.'S numerous Man'f'g Plants. 



THE COLUMBIA STEEL DRILLER. 



> THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




II BOSTON CASING 



<b> LINE PIPE 



<£> DRIVE PIPE 




b> TUBING 

As Manufactured by the 

NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



SSSBSSSSSSSSSSS'SS'SSSS'S&S 



Fop sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through 5 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 4- 



FRANCISCO, CAI.., FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 28, 1902. 



Prick, Ten > bnts. 



BONDS OF THE ASSOCIATED. 



Union Trust Company Neither Guarantees 
Payment of Principal op Interest. 



The Conditions oT the Trust Mortgage Such That 

It Is Extremely Unlikely Any Individual, Bank 

or Corporation Will Purchase the Bonds. 



The Associated Oil company 
has executed a trust mortgage to 
the Union Trust company of San 
Francisco. 

Some seem to think that this 
means the Union Trust company 
has practically agreed to loan the 
Associated Oil company money to 
the amount the mortgage calls for, 
and has in reality purchased or 
agreed to purchase the issue of 
bonds, taking as security the 
property of the Associated Oil 
company. 

That this view of the matter is 
taken by many holders of shares 
of different companies included in 
the Associated is shown by the 
many letters received by the Pa- 
cific Oil Reporter, and for this 
reason this paper desires to give 
to the public the fullest informa- 
tion possible in regard to the 
much-vexed bond question now 
so much in evidence In regard to 
the Associated Oil company, which 
seems to be in serious difficulty 
not only as to finances, but also 
as to the means which will enable 
it to produce the millions of bar- 
rels of oil it has contracted to de- 
liver for the next five years at 
prices far lower than those pre- 
vailing at the present time, and 
fully 50 percent lower than what 
the price will be two years or 
even one year hence. 

If the Associated expects to be 
relieved from its present uncom- 
fortable plight by the early and 
satisfactory placing of the bonds 
for which the Union Trust com- 
pany Is trustee there is every 
reason to believe the directors of 
the Associated will meet with dis- 
appointment as it would seem 
that with the existing provisions 
in the documents no individual or 
bink or corporation would con- 
sider for a minute the advisability 
of advancing money for the pur- 
chase of these bonds. 

The amount of the mortgage is 
$5,000,000. 

There are 5.000 bonds of $1,000 
each, running from August 1, 
1902, for a period of twenty years, 
the entire issue not to be payable 
until August 1, 1922. The bonds 
are to bear interest at the rate of 
8 per cent per annum, but 3 per- 
cent of this interest is provided to 



pay the mortgage tax, if same is 
levied upon the value given here- 
in to secure the bonds. This 
would leave 5 percent as the real 
interest on the bonds, exclusive 
of the possible mortgage tax. 

The coupons are payable 2J4 
percent on the 1st of February of 
each year, and 2^ percent on 
the 1st of August of each year, 
and a 3 percent coupon on April 
1st of each year. But in any 
year, prior to April 1st of that 
year, in which the Associated 
Oil company produces proper tax 
receipts, showing that they have 
fully satisfied any mortgage tax 
that may have been collected on 
the value of this mortgage, or in 
case, during such year, no mort- 
gage tax is levied upon the value 
of this mortgage, then, all the 3 per 
cent coupons attached to this issue 
of bonds for such year are to be sur- 
rendered to them, without any 
payment whatever. 

A default in the payment of 
any interest, extending for ninety 
days after such payment is due, 
makes all the bonds in default 
and due and payable, but in case 
of such default, a majority of the 
holders of the bonds then issued 
and outstanding, is requisite to 
cause the trustee to take pos- 
session of the property and oper- 
ate the same for the benefit of the 
bond-holders, or to foreclose the 
mortgage and sell the property 
and distribute the proceeds pro 
rata to the holders of the outstand- 
ing bonds. A majority of the 
bondholders may, also, at any 
time, waive any default occuring 
under this mortgage. 

The sinking fund provided un- 
der this mortgage calls for the pay- 
ment, beginning on July 1, 1904, 
and continuing each year there- 
after, in the sum of 5 percent of 
the amount of all bonds issued 
and outstanding on the 1st day of 
July each year. The sinking fund 
shall first be applied to paying 
any interest that may be in de- 
fault on such outstanding bonds, 
and if, in case of default, there 
are not sufficient funds in the sink- 
ing fund to pay interest on all the 
outstanding bonds, then such in- 
terest shall be paid pro rata. If 
there is no default in interest, the 



funds in the sinking fund shall be 
used from time to time to redeem 
any outstanding bonds that may 
be offered for sale at or below 
105: and if no bonds are at any 
time, or from time to time, offered 
for sale at or below 105, then such 
sinking fund shall be Invested, 
from time to time, by the trustee 
under this deed of trust or mort- 
gage. 

The stocks in all other companies 
owned by the Associated Oil com- 
pany are included in this deed of 
trust or mortgage, but until any 
default in interest is made, the 
Associated Oil company has the 
right to collect all dividends de- 
clared on said stocks and to re- 
ceive the full beneficial use of 
same. 

The Union Trust company di- 
stinctly states on page n of the 
printed trust mortgage that all the 
recitals contained therein are made 
on behalf of the party of the first 
part, and that the Union Trust 
company assumes no responsibility 
as to the correctness of any state- 
ment contained therein; that they 
shall have no iesponsibility as to 
the validity of the deed of trust 
or moitgage; nor as to the execu- 
tion, or acknowledgment, or re- 
cording thereof; nor as to the 
amount or extent of the security 
afforded by the property covered 
by the deed of trust or mortgage, 
and that they shall not be in any 
way liable for the consequences 
of any breach on the part of the 
Associated Oil company of the 
covenants therein contained, or 
for any other act or thing there- 
under, except its own negligence. 

Summing up the whole matter 
and the security offered by the 
Associated Oil company for this 
$5,000,000, it seems that upon the 
payment of interest on the out- 
standing bonds each year and the 
payment of 5 percent into the 
sinking fund; In other words, 5 
percent for the sinking fund and 
the possible 8 percent interest on 
the coupons, amounting to 13 per- 
cent, they could each year take 
from the property, without any 
limit whatever, and divide all the 
proceeds as dividends; or in other 
words, they could continually de- 
plete the value of the property 
by removing the oil therefrom; 
and if there were a sufficient 
market for the oil, they could, 
within 5 years' time, drill and 
operate a sufficient number of 
wells to completely exhaust the 
oil contained in the property. If 
they paid for that period of 5 
years the 5 percent into the sink- 
ing fund and the 8 percent inter- 
est, they would have legally the 
right to declare dividends out of 
all the proceeds of the property, 
and at the end of that period of 



time hand over a property drained 
of all its value, with whatever 
plant it may hnve thereon, and 
still act within their legal rights 

There is also a provision in this 
mortgage that two thirds of ih e 
holders of outstanding bonds at 
any time can suspend the opera- 
tion of the sinking-fund clause for 
the 5 percent payment, for a 
period not exceeding one year at 
any one time. This provision and 
also the provision making it nec- 
essary that a majority of the hold- 
ers of outstanding bonds is neces- 
sary to take action in case of any 
default, conclusively shows that 
the small bondholdt r has no rights 
whatever except such as the ma- 
jority choose to give him. 

On a mortgage on mining prop- 
erty (and oil properties are of this 
class) where the actual substance 
of the security is being contin- 
ually taken from the ground 
and not being replenished, thus 
constantly reducing the security, 
a sinking fund of 5 percent per 
annum is certainly totally inade- 
quate as a provision for ultimate 
payment of the bonds. Houses, 
lands and manufacturing proper- 
ties have a renting, earning and 
producing power that is practic- 
ally continuous and thus afford a 
basis of security, even where the 
current yearly revenues above in- 
terest aie absorbed. But a min- 
ing property from which the oil is 
once taken has no power of repro- 
duction and as no limit is placed 
upon the quantity that may be 
removed in any one year, it would 
hardly seem that the present mort- 
gage affords any adequate, or sat- 
isfactory, security on which to 
base the issue and sale of these 
bonds and assure their final pay- 
ment. 

NEW STYLE OF TENDER. 

It Will Carry Both Oil and 
Water for the Locomotive. 

The Southern Pacific has turned 
out from its Sacramento shops a 
new style of tender, one designed 
to carry both fuel oil and water 
for the locomotive. Only one has 
been built as an experiment. If 
it stands the test, every oil-burn- 
ing locomotive will be furnished 
with the new style tender. The 
tender is semi-cylindrical in shape 
and has a capacity of 3,300 gal- 
lons of oil and 7,300 gallons of 
water — enough of each for 300 
miles of travel at high speed. 
Practical railroaders, among them 
Chief Foreman Russel of the 
West Oakland yards, are confident 
that it will prove a success. If it 
does, it will work a great economy 
in California and Southern rail- 
roading. Oil and water stations 
will be needed only at intervals 
of 200 or 300 miles, which will be 
of especial advantage in desert 
stretches where water is to be 
had only at great difficulty and 
expense. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NATIONAL OIL REFINERY. 



A Plant On the Bay Shore That Is Making 
Lots of Asphalt. 



The California Asphalt a Successful Competitor in 

the East Over the Imported Trinidad Product, 

Both as to Quality and Price. 



The National Oil Refining com- 
pany's refinery, completed last 
April, is located at Rodeo, Contra 
Costa county, on the shore of 
the bay. 

The works are new, and so far 
the operations have been largely 
in the way of experimenting and 
making tests preliminary to run- 
ning to its full capacity. At pres- 
ent the refinery treats 350 barrels 
of crude oil a day, yielding 15 
tons of asphaltum of any desired 
grade. 

There are four stills of 250 bar- 
rels capacity each. Should the 
company desire to make asphaltum 
alone, it could treat 1,000 barrels 
of crude a day, or produce 50 
tons of asphaltum. This, how- 
ever, it does not care to do, inas 
much that it extracts from the oil 
not only asphaltum, but valuable 
distillates, neutral oils, green lu- 
bricating oils and kerosene, for all 
of which there is a market close 
at hand in San Francisco. 

Coalinga oil has so far been 



handled mainly, though the pro- 
duct of other fields will be treated 
as opportunity offers. The com- 
pany has valuable wells of its 
own in the Sunset district, but 
has not tried to refine any of the 
oil from that section while trans- 
portation matters are unsettled. 

Coalinga oil yields about 25 per- 
cent of asphaltum, a much lower 
percentage than that given by the 
heavy oils of Kern county, where 
45 or 50 percent ol the crude is 
asphalt. 

The National is able to manu- 
facture asphalt as cheaply with 
the low percentage Coalinga oil 
as Kern county refineries can 
with their high percentage oil be- 
cause it has a market for the by- 
products, while in Kern county 
the residuum is largely unmarket- 
able and much of it is thrown 
away. 

The National has been quite 
successful in marketing its asphalt 
in the East. The Trinidad pro- 
duct .has been in favor there so 
long, it has been hard to introduce 
the California product, even 



A BONANZA 
INVESTMENT 



The Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refin= 
ing Company, 

of California, has the largest and most valuable deposit 
of LIQUID ASPHALT yet discovered in this country; 
has its own REFINERY of over 400 barrels daily ca- 
pacity, which was started up on November 1st, and as 
the asphalt produced contains several by-products of 
great commercial value, the company should be able to 
earn and pay very heavy divideuds, in fact, so large as 
to warrant the stock advancing to par in the next few 
weeks, and probably to several hundred per cent pre- 
mium by the first of the new year. The stock is now 
selling at only 4^ CENTS PER SHARE ($45 per thou- 
sand) which is just 45 cents on the dollar, and the 
FIRST QUARTERLY DIVIDEND HAS BEEN 
PROMISED FOR JANUARY 1ST. Invest now and 
have your stock share in the first dividend. Write or 
call at once for reports, photographs of the refinery and 
the fullest information. 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 



2 K1LBY ST., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



though it be better than that of 
Trinidad. For years large con- 
tracts have generally specified 
that Trinidad asphalt shall be 
used. 

The California product must 
beat down and overcome this pre- 
judice, and on its merits win a 
standing and reputation in the 
East which will create a demand 
for it in the markets there. The 
California asphalt is superior to 
that of Trinidad, which has about 
45 percent of earthy matter, sand 
and clay. The latter ingredient 
is particularly objectionable and 
cannot be removed. The asphalt 
from the California refineries is 
absolutely pure, and the desired 
percentage of sand can be added 
easily and accurately. 

While the refinery produces as- 
phaltum of absolute purity, its 
value depends upon how it is 
treated. If it is overcooked, 
heated to too high a temperature, 
it becomes like gilsonite, losing 
its elasticity and tenacity. 

The matter of successfully treat- 
ing asphaltum at the refinery is 
one of scientific skill and judg- 
ment, requiring care and watch- 
fulness from the start. In the ex- 
perimental runs made by the Na- 
tional, there ha.s been a constant 
aim to turn out the very best as- 
phaltum possible, and the com- 
pany believes that it has now the 
facilities and the expert laborers 
and firemen which assure it that 
none better can be made than that 
produced at its works. 

The company has sold as- 
phaltum to advantage in Chicago, 
New York, and Boston and has 
received testimonials that the 
California product was more satis- 



factory than the Trinidad. 

The freight charges to the East 
are about $12 a ton in carload lots. 
The company views with favor 
the agreement which has been 
entered into by the manufacturers 
of asphaltum in regard to fixing 
the selling price. Aside frcm the 
great advantage of maintaining 
prices at a point asssuring a reason- 
able profit, a great benefit is to be 
derived by enabling the refiners 
at some future time to establish a 
selling agency in New York to 
handle the entire California 
product that may be shipped to 
the East. 

By doing so sufficient quantities 
may be shipped at one tLne to 
charter a sailing vessel and ship a 
whole cargo by sea. Heretofore 
shipments have been made only 
in carload lots. By sea the freight 
charges would probably be $6 a 
ton, just half what it is by rail. 
Assuming that the vessel would 
be six months on the route frcm 
San Francisco to New York and 
allowing 8 per cent interest for 
the six months on the capital that 
is idle while the shipment is in 
transit, and providing for the in- 
surance of the cargo, the charges 
to add to the freight of $6 a ton 
would not be over 75 cents a ton, 
or at the farthest $1. So by ship- 
ping by sea instead of rail, the 
California producer would save at 
least $5 a ton, bringing freight 
charges down from $12 to $7 a ton. 

In Boston and New York Trini- 
dad aspha turn usually sells at 
from $30 to $35 a ton. At those 
prices; California asphaltum will 
yield the refineries from Si 8 to $20 
a ton if shipped by rail and $23 
to $28 if transported by sea. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Filler CablesHtest in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 75^-in., 5£i-in. and 
4j^ in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6 in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, CaL 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKlttrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



MIDLAND PACIFIC. 



Eliminates Objectionable Clause 
From Contract. 
According to the Bakersfield 
Californian the Midland Pacific 
has made another concession to 
shippers by the elimination of the 
clause in the contract they are 
asked to sign, providing that ship- 
ments must be made whenever oil 
is 15 cents a barrel. 

The provision is to be stricken 
from all existing contracts and to 
be left out of those to be entered 
into hereafter. 

The railroad takes the ground 
that producers will cause their oil 
to be transported whenever theie 
is money to be made out of it, 
whether the price is above or be- 
low 15 cents, and they should not 
be compelled to sell at any stated 
figure. If it is to the interest of 
the producer to wait, the railroad 
can afford to wait, knowing that 
when business revives it will de- 
rive whatever benefit is to be ob- 
tained from performing the ser- 
vice of hauling. 

As has been stated frequently, 
all contracts are void in the event 
that the promoters of the road fail 
to have work begun and finished 
within a limited time, and all doc- 
uments are to be held in escrow 
by the Kern County Board of 
Trade until the Midland has 
earned them by the fulfillment of 
its propositions. 



RETAIN YOUR OIL LAND. 



The Oil Industry on a Solid and 
Sure Foundation, 

An expert in matters of oil, now 
in Southern California, has on his 
tongue's end, " Hold on to your 
oil lands." He gives reasons for 
the belief that is in him, as he has 
come from Texas fields, satisfied 
that for permanancy and revenue- 
getting California lands surpass 
all others. 

In a recent letter to his Eastern 
connections this expert wrote: 

" Beaumont's big gushers are 
things of the past So much any 
one with capacity to think might 
have foretold. The millions 
wasted at $10,000 an acre and 
even more, might hare been 
saved. It was a physical impos- 
sibility that any field with so 
great tendency to relieve itself 
could at the same time remain as 
prodigious a producer as then. 
The greater the development the 
sooner the time was due to arrive 
when the escape valves in the 
shape of wells would enable the 
pressure to subside. The time 



years. There is not a gusher in 
all Beaumont. The best of them 
are down to a little better than 
1.000 barrels a day and some 

sixty arc submerged in the salt 
water that has come in from the 
the gull." 

While not too optimistic, he ad- 
vises holding the lands, as prices 
now are firmer than in many 
months, and with the concentra- 
tion of holdings prices must re- 
main stable. New uses for oil, 
with the by-products obtained, 
and the growing demand for as- 
phaltum causes a drain upon the 
crude product that is being felt. 
This is evidenced by the reported 
merging of many refineries and 
the Standard in Calilornia. These 
are factors in a revival of interest, 
and with this, large capital will 
flow into the legitimate lines of 
the industry. 

From reports that are chronicled 
in the press no oil field in the 
United States is more stable and 
productive of results than the 
proved fields of California. The 
claim that the oil would end, that 
the caverns below would be ex 
hausted, and that disturbances 
would cause the flow to cease, has 
been eliminated, as years of 
pumping have served to close the 
wails of the croakers. 



Oil Found in Englaud. 

According to a report of the 
Middlesborough Town and Lands 
company. Limited, oil has been 
found within twenty-five miles of 
Middlesborough, and the board 
have for a long time been anxious 
that the Middlesborough basin 
should be tested for this product 
of which indications 



tions are abundant and that in the 
drilling of a well, at the tain 
oil was actually struck, and had in 
be shut off by closing the pipe, 
ICarly in September last, tin 
manager reported that he com- 
menced negotiations with an nil 
expert who had examined the 
land, with a view of forming a 
local company, w th enough capi- 



have been tal t0 SUrt the sinki "K ol 'sufficient 
test wells in ihe valley close to 
found from time to time. The | the town.-London Petroleu., 



manager says that these indica view. 



.mi Re- 



Oil on the S. P. 

As the number of engines on 
the Southern Pacific burning oil 
was increased, it was found neces- 
sary to provide stations where oil 
could be taken on. The oil tanks 
in course of construction at Suisun, 
Vallejo and Elmira are about com- 
pleted and ready for the distri- 
bution of oil to the engines. Each 
tank is of large capacity and ca- 
pable or supplying many engines. 

There are now nearly seventy- 
five oil-burning engines on the 
western division, and it is esti- 
mated that these engines travel a 
distance all told of over 250,000 
miles a month, and that it requires 
on an average of about 1,000 gal- 
lons for every 100 miles. It is 
estimated that a saving is made 
on the oil-burning engines over 
those with coal of about $16 per 
100 miles. 

So pleased are the head officials 
with the oil as a fuel that they 
are committed to the policy of 
converting all their engines into 
oil burners just as fast as the 
changes can be made. 

The San Joaquin division of 
the Southern Pacific has 108 en- 
gines now equipped with oil 
burners which exceeds the num- 
ber equipped on any two divisions 
combined. Only four coal burn- 
ng engines remain on the divi- 
sion. The total amount of oil 
consuaed on the division last 



has come already, within two j month was 64,831 barrels. 



GOLD! 

Never Goes Begging 

It is always at par. You don't have to seek a market or 
discount your goods. You are not subject to the dictation 
or control of the trusts. Fort hese and many other reasons 
a good gold property is one of the best investments, and 
stock in a company having a gold property of proven 
merit, managed by men of honesty and mining ability, 
offers to. the poor man one of the best avenues to 
independence. Such a proposition is the 

Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owning the Hudson group of mines in the Big Bug Dis- 
trict, Arzina, surrounded by rich 
producing mines. To corninue 
development a block of treasury 
stock is now being sold at 




CENTS 

PER SHARE 

Par Vdlye$i.oo 
Full Paid, 
Non-Assessable. 



Send for particulars. 



W. G. YOUNG & CO., 



Fiscal 
Agents 



628-630 Laughlin Bldg. 
BANK REFERENCES Los Angeles, Cal. 



100 Acres HaIf Moon Ba ? 0il District 



San Mateo Co., Cal. 



On mest favorable terms. Would also lease first-class Standard Rig 
to responsible company. 

THIS TRACT IS IN THE HEART OF THE FIELD 

Address chas. F. O'Brien, 

420 California Street Telephone Bush 686 San Francisco, Cal. 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



FITLER'S 1 Oil Well Supply Co/s 



DRILLING 

CABLES 






Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

- Name 

Determines 

the 
Quality 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners' Association- 



W B.WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS 

Onb Year $2 50 

Six Months 1 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Single COPIES IOC 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressedto Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name anti address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal., 
rs second-class matter. 

FRIDAY.. NOVEMBER 28,1902 



THB PEERLESS. 



One year ago the Pacific Oil 
Reporter com- 
lncrease in menced publish- 
Oil Exports ing in tabular form pumpinglntott^ Standard's reser 



Closes Contract for Sale of Nine- 
Million Barrels to the Standard. 

The Peerless last week closed 
the sale of 9,000,000 barrels of oil 
to the Standard Oil company at 
20 cents a barrel. 

The contract calls for the de- 
livery of 5,000 barrels per day for 
five years commencing on January 
1,1903, and means the payment 
of $1,800,000 at the rate of $1,000 
a day. 

The Peerless is already at work 
preparing to fill this, the greatest 
order ever received in the history 
of the oil industry by any one 
company. At least ten more 
wells will be drilled immediately, 
and more will follow as the neces- 
sities demand. 

The Peerless has 160 acres, 
every acre of which is producing 
land, containing 500,000 barre.s o 
crude oil to the acre, or a total of 
80,000,000 barrels for the entire 
tract. Thus far the wells of the 
Peerless which have been pumped 
steadily for two years show no 
signs of diminution of yield. 

After the wells are drilled and 
put on the pump the company 
will have no further expenses ex 
cept those of pumping which are 
very small, the entire cost of 
pumping from the wells into the 
reservoirs, gauging the oil, and 



the monthly ex- 
ports of oil from San Francisco. 

For many months the showing 
made was exceedingly poor, the 
total exports from month to month 
averaging less than $10,000. 

This amount has steadily in- 
creased, especially during the last 
six months, until the contrast be- 
tween the exports of 1901 and 
1902 are very encouraging, and 
show how our export trade in oil 
is increasing, and how immense is 
the trade in oil which will eventu- 
ally be built up between Cali- 
fornia and the outside world. 

In 1901, during the months of 
August, September and October 
only 80,601 gallons, valued at $17,- 
926 were exported. 

In 1902 the exports for these 
same months were 1,559,645 gal- 
lons, valued at $87,756, over five 
times what they were the year 
before. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter 
predicts that in 1903, the total ex- 
ports for these three months will 
amount to close on to half a mil- 
lion dollars if not more. 

California crude oil will soon 
be shipped in immense quantities 
not only to Hawaii, but to South 
America, China, Japan, Australia 
and elsewhere, and as our re- 
fineries increase in capacity and 
in the knowledge of treating the 
crude oil their products will be 
exported in place of those which 
are now shipped from Eastern re- 
fineries, and are the products of 
Eastern crude. 

Even now the California oil in- 
dustry is in its infancy. 



voirs, not exceeding 2 cents a bar- 
rel. 

This contract leaves a handsome 
profit to the Peerless company, 
and will enable the company to 
pay very large dividends for 
many years. By July the divi- 
dends will be at least 25 cents per 
share monthly, and this will be 
increased. The drilling of the 
ten wells will cost $40,000, and 
these completed, one rig will be 
kept drilling. 

The stock is held mostly by the 
directors of the company, and 
what little can be had on the out- 
side is being eagerly purchased 
for permanent investment. It is 
more than probable that this stock, 
most of which was sold at $1 will 
soon reach $25 a share if not 
higher. On Monday 100 shares 
were sold at $12. 



Horn to New York without stop- 
ping. 

The plan of the company, how- 
ever, is to take on California crude 
oil at San Francisco sufficient for 
fuel to take the steamers of its 
line to St. Thomas in the West 
Indies a distance of 12,000 or 13,- 
000 miles. At that point Texas 
Crude will be taken to feed the 
furnace fires to New York and 
back to St. Thomas, where an 
other stock of Texas oil will be 
taken on for fuel to San Fran- 
cisco. 

The Arizona, 8,672 gross tons, a 
sister ship of the Alaskan, is now 
nearing completion at the Union 
Iron works. She will be ready 
for service in about two months. 
She is being fitted out as an oil- 
burner. Oil will be stored be- 
tween the double bottom as well 
as in tanks. 

The vessels of this line will be 
the first steamers plying between 
New York and San Francisco to 
use oil for fuel. It indicates thai 
ship-owners are awakening to the 
economy of oil over coal, parti- 
cularly when it can be bought so 
cheaply at ports of call. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



THB ENTIRE FLEET. 



All Steamers of American-Ha 
wailan Company to Burn Oil. 

The entire freight-carrying fleet 
of the American-Hawaiian Steam- 
ship company will be equipped 
as oil-burners at the earliest pos- 
sible moment. The fleet consists 
of nine steamers. The Alaskan 
arrived in port from New York 
November 7th, making the run of 
between 13,000 and 14,000 miles 
without stopping her engines but 
once, and that was when she 
stopped to take on coal. She has 
the very best of engines and 
boilers and consumes forty-five 
tons of coal a day. The expense 
for fuel will be cut in two when 
oil is used. Plans for transform- 
ing her into an oil-burner are now 
being made, but the change will 
not be made this trip. It will 
take a couple of months to make 
the necessary alterations. The 
space now occupied by coal 
bunkers will be more than ample 
to furnish tankage room for oil 
sufficient to make the trip from 
San Francisco direct around the 



Standard's Pipe=Line. 

On Monday thirteen carloads of 
pipe for the Standard Oil eight- 
inch pipe-line which is now build- 
ing from the Kern River fields to 
Point Richmond, arrived from the 
East. With former shipments re- 
ceived there are in the neighbor- 
hood of twenty-five carloads of 
the pipe now lying in the yards 
at Point Richmond in readiness 
for the crew of men which began 
construction operations at this end 
on Tuesday to span the distance 
yet to be laid, which is something 
like sixty miles. 

At the present time the pipe- 
line is progressing this way to 
tide water at the rate of some- 
thing like three-quarters of a mile 
per day. There is a big force of 
men employed in the work of 
ditching, cementing the joints, 
wrapping the pipe and filling in 
the ditch with dirt after the pro- 
cess of laying is complete. 

The Standard Oil officials are 
very desirous to complete the line 
before the first of the year and 
the second crew began work at 
this end on Tuesday last. When 
it is finished the big refinery will 
put on a larger force of men and 
the capacity of the plant will be 
taxed to the fullest extent. 

Six out of the ten pumping sta- 
tions to be built on the pipe-line 
are now under course of construc- 
tion, but none are yet completed. 
Those in the southern end of the 
San Joaquin valley are the near- 
est toward completion, as work 
was started from that end of the 
line. _. 

PRICE OF ASPHALT. ._ 



prices and has acted in harmoDy 
with the Standard. 

The agreement does not affect 
the prices of asphalt shipped to 
eastern markets. Several refiner- 
ies have unfilled contracts with 
eastern purchasers below the es- 
tablished price which they must 
fill. Besides in the East there is 
a sharp competition with Trinlnad 
asphalt which must be met and 
overcome in order to introduce the 
California product, which is com- 
paratively new to the market. 
The established price for asphalt 
in San Francisco is $13 a ton for 
D grade. Before the refiners came 
together, some Eos Angeles man- 
ufacturers sold asphalt as low as 
$7, a price which left absolutely 
no profit in the sale of the pro- 
duct. 



Ridiculous Assessment. 

Men and companies who are 
trying to hold down oil claims are 
very active just now, having as- 
sessment work done in order to 
hold claims, but there really isn't 
any work to do that needs to be 
done until a casing is to be started, 
and that is just the thing that 
most claim holders do not want to 
do. So they dig holes and fill 
them up again, or quarry out 
gypsum and pile it up, or do somt- 
thing equally unimportant which 
nevertheless satisfies the law. 
What ought to be done is to allow 
an alternative of either doing tte 
work or paying the cost of it into 
some public fund. As the law 
now stands only labor is bene- 
fited, and labor is not much bene- 
fited when it is set to work that 
counts nothing. — Tulare Register. 



Twenty-Seven Cents for 
Oil. 

The best offer for oi 1 made since 
the slump was that received by a 
Sunset company a few days ago, 
says the Californian. It amounted 
to 27 cents f. o. b.'at the depot for 
1,000 barrels a day, time one year. 
it was not accepted, though, for 
the reason that the company to 
which the proposition was made 
was not in a position to deliver, 
having no pipe-line. The eon- 
tract was closed, however, by an- 
other operator more favorably sit- 
uated as regards transportation. 



Agreement Effect Among Pro- 
ducers to Maintain Prices. 

The California asphalt manu- 
facturers have come to an agree- 
ment to maintain prices. There 
is no combine or pooling of in- 
terests. They have simply agreed 
to maintain a regular price for the 
different grades of asphalt. The 
Mercantile and National of San 
Francisco and all Eos Angeles 
manufacturers are parties to the 
agreement. The Union has not 
joined; it was not even asked, as 
it has all along refused to cut 



Personal. 

R. H. Herron, C. B. Barnes and 
S. T. Peet, representatives respect- 
ively of the Herron company, the 
National Supply and the Fair- 
banks-Morse Supply companies, 
were in Bakersfield last week. 
Their presence in Bakersfield at 
the same time was purely acciden- 
tal, and was probably due to the 
fact that things are brightening 
up to such an extent that the 
trade of the near future will bear 
close looking after. 



A Snap 

if taken advantage of at once. 

A Standard oil well boring out- 
fit complete. Now situated in the 
Colusa field for sale cheap or 
open to other propositions of great 
advantage to the right party. 
For particulars address, P. O. 
Box No. 132, Corning, Cal. 

In Canada. 

The Ontario Lands and Oil com- 
pany announces a profit of .£3,415 
for the past year. After making 
the dividend on the preference 
shares up to 5 percent, there re- 
mains ^415 to be carried, forward. 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



_z 



Recent Developments Which Have Made OH One ot the 
Greatest Industries In the Far West 



to be met with an increase in output 
All that seetus to aland between the pro- 
duce! ami profitable business is (In- 
ability of the railroads to handle the 
.amount of oil that will be needed. The 
completion pe-line, 



ALAMEDA 

The Fifteen Three Oil company has 
levied an assessment of 2 cents per share. 

ARIZONA. 

Arizona is not yet listed among the oil- 
producing areas. It appears that the re- 
port of a strike by the Pinal Paraffine 
mpam. about thirty miles east of 
l-'lorence, was premature, to say the 
The company has announced that the 
report was circulated without authority, 
stating that while indicatiens are shown 
by its well, which is now about I.ooo feet 
deep, no oil has been struck. 

KERN 

R. K. Howk has a good well in the 
bole he is drilling back of the Dabney 
lease in the McKittrick district. 

The Sunset Crude is about to build a 
refinery on its lease at Sunset, the plant 
to cost in the neighborhood of f 15,000. 

The Lucky Boy, Midway, will drill 
deeper in the hope of securing a larger 
supply. It is judged that the well as it 
stands is good for fifty or seventy-five 
barrels a day. 

The deepest well yet to be drilled in 
the Kern river district is one which the 
Southern Pacific is said to contemplate 
putting down. The hole will be sunk to 
a depth of 2,000 feet at least. 

Interest is reviving in the Temblor 
district. The Royal Eagle sometimes 
since sold three-quarters of a section of 
land to Chicago parties, who have or- 
ganized a company upon it, which, ac- 
cording to the terms of the sale, is to do 
development work immediately. 

The Associated upon taking possession 
of the property of the Comet dismantled 
the lease, ceasing drilling and the pump- 
ing of a number of the wells. It has 



lately been hastily placing the lease back 
in its former condition, however, the fact 
being overlooked that according to Un- 
original agreement, the wells nn 
pumped continuously and a certain 
amount of drilling must be done. 

Probably the biggest well in the Mid- 
w»j districtistlmt recently finished by 
thv Altooua Midway company and now 
perforated. It is good for 300 barrels a 
day. The log of the Altoona shows Unit 
tin- well is 1,194 feel deep. No water 
whatever was encountered, a source of 
great danger in many fields thus being 
absent. Over the oil sand, which is 
about 150 feet in thickness, lies a top- 
ping of 225 feet of impervious clay, 
very difficult of penetration, but not- 
withstanding the well was completed 
with two strings of casing and the 
inner was suspended on the elevators 
when the final landing was made. 

The Burks Oil company, which has 
forty acres in the quarter section where 
the first development of the Midway was 
made, is now reported to be in good 
shape, a reorganization having been re- 
cently effected by which J. \V. Stroud 
became president. The Burks has the 
land on one sixth royalty and by the 
terms of the lease is not compelled to do 
further work until the price of oil goes 
to 50 cents a barrel at the pump. The 
well contains 126 feet of oil sand and the 
gravity of the oil is 15 . A test more or 
less reliable as a basis of estimate, places 
the well in the 200-barrel class. 

Signs of early activity are everywhere 
manifest and according to reports from 
dealers in supplies, nearly all the com- 
panies which have been shut down dur- 
ing the low price period are preparing to 
resume. Leases that have been stripped 
of all machinery and rigs are again to be 
placed in commission as producing 
properties and the increase in demand is 



the probabilities are that the common 
people who merely pump oil and trv to 
sell it, will not have to stand so long, hat 
in hand, awaiting the favor of a car. 

LOS ANG1 

In I. os Angeles 75 cents per barrel has 
been declined by producers. Lai An- 
geles oil men watch the Kern Rivei Geld, 
basing their prii es noon those prevailing 
there, raising anil lowering theirs, as 
those of Bakersfield go up and down. 

NEVADA. 

The heaviest engine on the Nevada 
county narrow gunge railroad has been 
fitted with oil burners and a trial run 
made successfully. Indue time all the 
engines along the line will be changed 
from wood burners into oil burners. 

SAN IiBNITO. 

Everything is in readiness to com- 
mence work on the Ladd Oil company's 
rig on the Croxton rauch, and work will 
commence as soon as the fuel arrives. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

At Sutumerland there is much con- 
sternation over the discovery that the 
teredo, the deadly foe to wharves and 
piling, is at work upon the underpinning 
of the oil wharves. 

The California Liquid Asphalt com- 
pany has contracted to supply the new 
Potter Hotel at Santa Barbara for two 
years with distillate for fuel purposes. 
The amount of the contract is $24,000. 

A large flow of oil was struck by the 
Pinol company about three miles north- 
west from the Careaga field last week. It 
is impossible to estimate the flow of the 
well, but it will be many barrels. The 
oil is of 28 gravity and considered of the 
highest grade in this section. 

Oil of the finest quality has been 
struck by the Pinal company, who have 
been drilling in the upper Graciosa can- 
yon for the past few months. The oil 



sand was encountered shotth alter 
o'clock, Thursday afternoon, last week, 
ami Immediately the oil filled the casing 
and ran over the top. The oil is 01 

wis encountered at a depth 

L The Western Union ex- 

innate the well under the present 

iona as capable of more than 100 

barrels per ■: . 

A peculiar strike is reported in the 
prospect oil well now being drilled on 
the l'urissima ranch, recently pure! 
from Judge Cunrield. At a depth of 
i,*oo or 1 700 feet the drill penetrated a 
stratum of hot claj and the deeper Hu- 
ll rill went the hotter was the clay. The 
drillers were still ot wxirk in this mysteri- 
ous hot-bed, and were prepared to strike 
almost anything from a hot sulphur 
spring to a flow of boiled linseed oil. 
Petroleum already heated for road 
sprinkling would effect a saving in fuel. 
The clay strums as it is brought to the 
surface. The progress of the drillers is 
being watched with great interest. 

At Carreaga the Western Union com- 
pany has eight wells in oil, all of which 
have to be pumped in ordertokeep them 
from flowing over. The surplus, after 
supplying the Pacific Coast Railway, the 
Union Sugar Factory, the Sdtita Maria 
Flour Mills, and a number of smaller 
institutions, is piped from Carreaga to 
Alcatraz, where it is partially refined and 
then stored in mammoth tanks prepara- 
tory to being shipped to the Orient. The 
work on the ten new wells recently con- 
tracted for continues uninterrupted. Oil 
was struck in well No. 12 early last week. 
No. 13 is having the casing put down, 
and a strike is expected at almost any 
time. No. n has been giving the drill- 
ers considerable annoyance, but the dif- 
ficulties have been overcome, and the 
drill is making good progress. Drilling 
on No. 14 commenced this week. 

The best reports came from Carpin- 
teria concerning the Columbian Oil and 
Asphalt company. The refinery is now 
in full operation and is turning out daily 
a large output of asphalt and lubricating 
oils. The company this week com- 
pleted a system by which the plant is 
absolutely safe from fire. The company 
is using Summerland oil and its own 
liquid asphalt, the result being a very 
superior quality of refined asphalt which 
contains all the best qualities of asphalt 
made from crude petroleum and that 



INVESTIGATION EM INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Kern County, Cab, situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present operations is in famous Section 2, Township 11, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Well No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 Cents A SHARE 



WILL LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 Cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that you act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value $ 1. 00) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment. We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member California Petroleum Miners' Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and Postoffice Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

ELK BORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 



470-471-472 Parrott Building 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



made from liquid asphalt. The com- 
pany has a great demand for its product. 
The deep aspha.t well is now over 1,200 
feet deep, and drilling is very difficult 
on account of the asphalt wbich runs in 
so abundantly that it requires constant 
pumping out, leaving but a very short 
time at long intervals when the drill can 
be used. A new shaft is now being dug 
near the creek back of the refinery, 
where the liquid asphalt deposits are 
very abundant. A large area of this val- 
uable land has just been purchased by 
the company, and adds greatly to the 
value of their holdings. 

The deep well of the Crescent Oil com- 
pany, on Ortega hill, back of Summer- 
land, is now down over 850 feet, with 7 J£- 
inch casing. The drill has already passed 
through rich oil strata, but the indica- 
tions are good for something much bet- 
ter below. The Eastern agents of the Col- 
umbian and Crescent companies, the 
Ameri an Investment compaHy of Bos- 
ton, Mass., are well pleased with the 
present developments and prospects, as 
is also Mr. J. R. Scupham, of San Fran- 
cisco, the manager of the companies. 

SANTA CLARA. 

The Orchard Crude Oil company, 
drilling near Los Gatos, struck a big 
pocket of gas. last Saturday, which sent 
water and mud 100 feet high. The well 
is down over 1,000, and oil indications 
are good. The stock is largely owned in 
San Jose. 

There is a renewal of activity in the 
neighborhood of Gilroy. James P. 
Brunton, president of the Alberta Oil 
company, announces that work will be 
resumed by the company on the prop- 
erty near Sargent's station. The recent 
strike made by the Watsonville Oil com- 
pany three miles west of Sargents' 
gives the Alberta people more confi- 
dence. The derrick for the new well is 
being put in place. The old well h«s 
been abandoned because the casing of it 
has been struck and cannot be removed. 

The derrick for the new well on the 
Sargent tract is being put in place as 
rapidly as possible. A large tank, with 
a capacity of about 300 barrels, has been 
put above the oil well and at an elevation 
of 40 feet above the top of the well. A 
small pipe runs thereto from a plug inthe 
well and the pressure of gas is forcing the 



oil into the tank. The flow of oil is 
fully forty feet above the well, and 
though it comes through shale and de- 
bris in the well, it shows conclusively 
that there is lots of oil below and gas 
enough to make the flow a "gusher" if 
the well was free from debris. The com- 
pany is confident that the new well will 
be a "gusher" of several hundred bar- 
rels each day when the sand is perfor- 
ated. 

SAN MATEO. 

The Pilarcitos are down abou; 400 feet 
in their first well. 

Frick & I Parker are working to com- 
plete their first deep well on the Tunitas. 

The refinery at Halfmoon Bay is again 
in operation and is being worked to its 
full capacity. 

The Wisconsin well is now over 1,200 
feet deep, and the conditions are en- 
tirely satisfactory. 

J. B. Treadwell has formed a company 
which is now shipping in a rig to work 
east of Halfmoon Bay. 

The Halfmoon Bay district shows 
progress in development work by all the 
companies now operating. 

The San Mateo Oil company has not 
succeeded in getting the lost bit from 
their well, but has pushed it one side 
and is now drilling at a depth of over 
900 feet. 

Guiberson, Sallee & Hayne are fast 
neariug the completion of their last 
well and expect to strike the oil stratum 
any day, when the tools will be returned 
to well No. 5 which needs cleaning out. 

VENTDRA. 

Work is still being pushed on the Pris- 
cilla Oil company well on San Cayetano. 
The well is now about 1,200 feet deep. 

Operations, which have been stopped 
for some weeks on the "Fitch" well on 
the Santa Paula canyon, will be resumed 
in a few days. 

The Union Oil company are running a 
string of cleaning-out tools on their Tor- 
rey lease. It is their intention to clear 
out about six wells. 

The Weldon Oil company are pulling 
out the casing in the well which they 



abandoned so ne months ago, and will 
drill a new well on the Hartman ranch. 

The Merchants' and Traders' Oil com- 
pany are down about 700 feet on the 
Burson lease near Bardsdale. It is ex- 
pected they will have to go about 1,400 
feet before they reach the oil. 

The Olga Ventura Oil company, who 
brought in a well producing a light grade 
of oil in Lion Canyon some months ago, 
have started pumping the same prepara- 
tory to starting the drill on a new well. 

Well No. 5 of the Saltmarsh Canon 
Oil company is down about 300 feet, with 
a good showing of oil. It is expected 
that the next 1,000 feet will bring in 
another gusher similar to the last one 
drilled on this property. 

A car load of heavy 5% casing has 
lately arrived for the Sulphur Mountain 
Petroleum company, and they have 
again started operations. With this 
string of casing they expect to go in the 
neighborhood of 2,200 feet when they 
expect to strike oil. 



New incorporations. 

The following companies have 
recently filed articles of incor- 
poration with the Secretary of 
State: 

White Rock Oil company. Prin- 
cipal place of business, Portland, 
Me. Directors— R. E. Pierce, W. 
H. Peck, S. Hunt, J. C. Ward and 
others. Capital stock, $200,000; 
subscribed, $3.40. 

Williams Asphalt Mastic com- 
pany. Principal place of busi- 
ness, San Francisco. Directors — 
H. F. Williams, W. H. Worswick, 
H. J. Leric, W. R. Williams and 
W. H. Coke Capital stock, $ioo,- 
000; subscribed, $500. 

Crude petroleum, which, it is 
said, contains about 85 percent 
of high grade illuminating oil and 
a specific gravity of over 70° 
has been discovered near Nashua, 
Ind. 



Big Russian Oil Fire. 

Nearly 3,000,000 gallons of pe- 
troleum stored in reservoirs on 
the outskirts of Odessa, was de- 
stroyed by fire recently. The loss 
was $4,500,000. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



Keep Your Eye on 
Halfmoon Bay and 
you'll soon see some 
Oil Stocks Soaring 
above Par. 



Write us fop maps, pic- 
tures, literature, etc. 



The Debenture Surety Co. M0 Bush « : .mbi« Bid*, 

* San Francisco, Calif. 



(INCORPORATED) 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL IN THE PHILIPPINES. 



Most ol the Islands Abound In 
Petroleum Indications. 

F. H. Oliphant, of the United 
.- tates Geological Survey, reports 
as follows concerning oil in the 
Philippines: 

The existence of petroleum is 
known on most of the islands of 
this group. The workings are of 
the most primitive nature, carried 
on usually by the natives with 
appliances and substitutes that 
are surprising in their ingenuity — 
as is the patience necessary to ac- 
complish the results. 

Explorers are busy examining 
the conditions of the existence and 
the quality of the petroleum, and 
the probabilities are that in a few 
years the petroleum will be one 
of the articles of export, instead 
of being, as at present, almost en- 
tirely an article of import. 

The islands of Panay, Leyte, 
Gulmaras, Negros, Mindanao, and 
Cebu are known to contain pe- 
troleum. The large island of 
Mindanao produces some petro- 
leum in the vicinity of Chatta- 
batto. The island of Cebu has 
deposits of petroleum at Toledo, 
on the west coast, associated with 
coal and natural gas. On the is- 
land of Panay petroleum is re- 
ported at Janiway, in the province 
of Iloilo. The island of Leyte is 
said to have deposits of petroleum 



four miles from the town of Vil- 
laba, on the west coast. 

The position of these islands 
would indicate the probable ex- 
istence of petroleum, as Borneo, 
on the southwest, and Formosa 
and Japan, on the north, contain 
productive areas that are ex- 
tensively operated. 

The importation of refined pe- 
troleum from the United States is 
increasing rapidly, the imports for 
1901 being more than double the 
amount for 1900. The value of 
the importations in 1900 was 
$7,921: in 1901, $1 19,424. 



TEMPERING DRILLS. 



How Crude Petroleum Is Suc- 
cessfully Used in the Process. 

An experience in the tempering 
of drills with petroleum is thus 
given by Ben Hastings of Chlor- 
ide, Arizona: 

" I have been experimenting 
lately on the use of common crude 
oil for tempering drills with such 
favorable results as to warrant its 
more extended use. The most 
serviceable slack tub is fou d to 
be a common five-gallon oil can, 
with the top left as a flap or cover 
to throw down and smother the 
flame in case the oil ignites from 
the hot steel. Frovided that the 
vessel is left open, this ignition, if 
it does happen, is very quiet, like 



that of coal tar, but with the use 
of > closed tub or tank the accu- 
mulated gases are liable to intra 
duce fireworks, as the writer can 
testify. There is really no neces- 
sity for an ignition of the oil, as 
the proper heat for plunging the 
steel — a bright red — is a little be- 
low the point necessary to flash 
the oil. 

" It is a very rare thing for an 
oil-tempered drill to break, and 
they wear much better than water- 
tempered steel. With oil the ama- 
teur will find no trouble in tem- 
pering steel to stand like an ex- 
pert's work, as a slight variation 
in temperature does not effect 
such a change in the final condi- 
tion of the steel as occurs in using 
water. 

" I do not use more than five 
inches of oil in the bottom of the 
can. The hotter the oil becomes 
the better are the results. The 
consumption of oil is small, prin- 
cipally due to that portion sticking 
to the drills on withdrawal. Plung- 
i ing them afterwards in loose dirt 
cleans them of this." 



OH Suit Demurrer. 

United States Circuit Judge 
Morrow sustained the demurrer 
last week in the case of H. F. Bul- 
wer against the Yukon Crude Oil 
company, Henry J. Crocker, Wen- 
dell lvaslon and others. The suit 
wis brought for alleged fraud in 
the transfer of shares in several 
oil companies. Judge Morrow, in 
sustaining the demurrer, stated 
that the directors of the Yukon 
Oil company should have been 
appealed to through the court. 
Bulwer appealed to the court di- 
rect. The complainant has been 
granted time in which to amend his 
complaint. 



Oil for English Engines. 

The Northeastern Railway com- 
pany has erected oil tanks at 
Gateshead for oil, and experi- 
mental runs have been made. 
These experiments are believed to 
have been successful, and are 
likely to be continued. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and BoNDSunderwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



Monthly Exports of Oil from San Francisco. 





Mineral 


, Crude, 


Mineral, Rekinbd, or Manufactured. 


Countries. 


INCLUDINC NAT- 
URAL OILS, WITH- 
OUT REGARD TO 
GRAVITY. 


Naphtha, including 
All Lighter Prod- 
ucts of Distillation. 


Illuminating. 


Lubricating 

and Heavy Paraffine 

Oils. 


Residuum, including 

Tar and ail other 
from which the light 
bodies have been dis- 
tilled. 




Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Bbls. 


Value 


August, 1902. 














893 

50 
1,490 


$339 

8 

540 












no 

310 


$18 
52 


37o 

4,700 
3,000 


$63 
876 

555 




































205 
644 
987 


45 
244 
372 
















2,400 
630 


455 
113 


























160 


26 
















1,661 

75 

1,208 

15,617 


361 

39 

496 

5,445 












7.700 
"3.970 
28,929 


1,361 
1,676 

3.809 


650 

2,502 

20,360 

450 


122 

502 

3,854 

no 








20,000 
630,000 


$3°° 
15,000 




















650,000 


$15,300 


5LI79 


$6,942 


35,062 


$6,650 


22,830 


$7,889 






September, 1902. 


800 
'58 


$.8 
9 
























100 
1,770 
5,300 
2,(67 
3.7IO 


$23 
275 
1,031 
395 
665 


1,832 


$429 








no 


$19 












280 
757 

7,176 
150 

2,308 


99 
229 

L734 

57 

577 












































































45° 

160 

7,920 

15,034 

300 


85 

46 

Ii'3l 

2,880 
55 






























150 
22,894 


21 
3,195 


50 

270 

27 


33 

168 

14 








19,052 


550 














20,010 


$607 


23,154 


$3,235 


37.4H 


$6,786 


12,850 


$3,340 






October, 1902. 














■56 


$107 
















580 
4,550 
280 
8,811 
550 
550 
770 


$109 

879 

61 

L595 
74 
80 
154 
















40 


20 






























SO 
23 


35 
8 














1 
























9,i3o 


$1,198 
















742 
500 


168 
112 


































1,650 

4,620 

28,740 

20 


214 

872 

5.477 

5 




















597. 9' ^ 


$19,930 


44.850 


5,086 


2,625 


82-, 
















SO7.912 


fio.ow 


SSQKo 


{6.284 


51,121 $9,520 


4.136 $1,273 





In IQOI the total exports from San Francisco for August, September and October were 80,601 gallons, va'ued at $17,926. 
In 1902 the total oil exports for the same months were 1,559.645 gallons, valued at $87,756. 



PACIFC OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

November i6, 1902. 

During the past week there has been 
a marked increase of business transacted 
in oil stocks, and a general stiffening of 
prices all along the line. 

The following table shows the bid and 
asked prices of some of tbe leading 
stocks a week ago as compared with to- 
day: 



r— NOV. 19 -^ 
BID ASKED 
$ .10 
75 



,— Nov. 26 — , 
BID ASKED 
$ .II $ .12 
.65 .80 

sales at .52 
90.00 91.00 



Bear Flag $ .09 

Central Point 50 

Four 50 .52 

Hanford 86.co 88.00 

Kern Oil 3.50 3.75 3.75 4.00 

Kern River 6.00 8.00 6,50 9.00 

Ivion 04 . . ; .05 .06 

Monarch 17 .19 .iq .20 

Monte Cristo 1.07% i.ro 1.20 1.25 

Occidental 12 .14 ... .14 .15 

Peerless 9.50 10.00 sales at 12.00 

Reed Crude 26 .30 .31 .32 

Sterling 1.5254 1.55 1.65 1.67% 

Twenty-eight 1.30 1.40 1.40 I.42J4 

It will be noted that most of these 
stocks which have registered a decided 
improvement are not in the Combine. 

The "banner" stock of the past week 
has been Peerless, showing a rise of 20 
percent in that time. The 9,000,000-bar- 
rel contract at 20 cents fully warrants the 
advance. 

At present prices and monthly rates of 
dividend now being paid by the follow- 
ing companies, the annual rate of inter- 
est on the investment is as follows: 



Fpur Oil 52 

Home 2.80 

Imperial \ 6 00 

Peerless 12.00 

San Joaquin 7.50 

Thirty-three 7-75 

Several of these companies are earn- 
ing much more than sufficient to pay 
these dividends and current expenses, 
but are using large sums in making pay- 
ments on improvements and develop- 
ment work. In course of time much of 
this indebtedness will be wiped out and 
the money available for dividends in- 
creased in proportion. Certainly the 
prospects for some of these stocks look 
bright. 

Trading in local stocks and miscel- 
laneous securities has been light during 
the week just past. Sugar stocks con- 
tinue firm, and in several instances an 
advance has been recorded. 



MON, 


AN 


INT. 


DIV. 


PERCENT 


.OI 




2214 


■°T% 




» 


.20 




IS 


.08 




8 


OS 




8 


.10 




15 



To Whom It May Concern. 

Boulder, Colo., Oct. 6, 1902. 
This is to certify that O. H. Jones, the 
oil locator of Los Angeles, Cal., located 
a well for the Otero Oil and Gas com- 
pany in the Boulder, Colo., oil fields in 
May, 1902; that the same was drilled in- 
to oil September 1, at a depth of 1,765 
feet; that since September 3 we have 
been pumping 100 barrels per day. This 
was not near any other producing well. 
P. J. CRETCHER, Director. 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November 26: 
CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 

200 at $ 13 . . I 26 00 

1,000 at 



2, 100 at 
1,000 at 



I at 



1,000 at 



1,000 at 



14 140 00 

FOUR. 

52 I1O92 00 

53 530 00 

GIANT. 

20 20 00 

HANFORD. 

9 at 87 00 783 00 

90 00 90 00 

HOME OIL. 

2 75 2,750 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

05 50 00 

JUNCTION. 



100 at 

200 at 

100 at 

1,000 at 



800 at 
100 at 
3.650 at 
2,100 at 
500 at 
100 at 

200 at 

1,200 at 

100 at 



10. 

13- 

14.. 

12. 



10 00 
26 00 
14 00 

120 OT> 



KERN. 

175 750 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 
1 07 J^ 860 00 

1 10 110 00 

1 12^ 4,106 25 

I 15 2,415 00 

1 15 (B 20) 575 00 

1 20 120 00 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 



13- 



26 00 

14 168 00 

15 15 00 



OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 
500 at 14 70 00 

PEERLESS. 

50 at 10 00 (S 30) 500 00 

200 at 10 00 2,000 00 

50 at 11 no (S 5) 55000 

50 at 1 1 00 550 00 

100 at 12 00 (B 90) 1,200 00 

225 at 12 00 2, 700 00 

REED CRUDE. 

100 at 30 30 00 

2,000 at 30 (S 30) 600 00 

5, 100 at 31 

SOVEREIGN. 

2,000 at 26 26000 

1, 200 at 27 324 00 

500 at 28 140 00 

STERLING. 

100 at 1 55 155 00 

300 at 1 57 J^ (B 10) 47250 

300at 1 57^ 472 50 

100 at 1 60 (B 30) 160 00 

300 at I 60 480 00 

100 at 1 62^ (S 10) 162 50 

100 at 1 67J^(S6o) 16750 

700 at 167}^ 1,17250 

200 at 1 70 (B30) 340 00 

500 at 165 82500 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 

100 at 1 40 140 00 

100 at 1 42^ 14250 



30,735 Shares Amount fa, 841 25 

AMERICAN DIS. TELEGRAPH. 

18 at 700 12600 

CAL. WINE ASSOCIATION. 

20 at 101 50 2,030 00 

15 at 101 62K 1,524 37 

HONOKAA SUGAR. 

20 at 13 50 270 00 

20 at 15 00 300 00 



93 Shares Amount 14,250. 37 

UNITED STATES 3's BONDS. 
1,000 at 108 00 }i,o8o 00 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. I,. CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. EWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Telephonb Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building, Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Building, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company. S. F. 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write J. D. Johnston, 
Newport, R. I. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

LOMA PRIETA PRUNE RANCH COMPANY, 
Location and principal place of business, 
San Francisco, California. Location of ranch. 
Monterey County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at the meeting of the 
Board of Directors held on the lothdayof Nov- 
ember, 1902, an assessment of five ($5.00) dollars 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immed ately in United 
States Gold Coin, at the office of ihe Secretaiy, 
3331 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 10th day of December, 
1902, will be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Friday, the gth day of 
January, igos. to pr.y the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

FRANK MORTON, Secretary. 



JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ, 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 385 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Kern," "Reed" and *' Monte Cristo." 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"United Tonopah" 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Brunswick" and "Grass Valley Consolidated." 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Write, to the undersigned for information regarding Oil and. 
Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, returning 10 
percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench Forcarryingandplacing 



bits in drilling stem boxes 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



W. E. YOULE 




CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil I^ands and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-6ve Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Present Address; 

Arbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



;, 



PACIFIC OIL EHPOKTBR 



II 



EA8TERN OIL SITUATION 



Steady Decrease In The Amount 
ot Production. 
The Oil City Derrick says that 
in spite of a very acceptable ad- 
vance in the crude market, and 
the heavy demand for Pennsyl- 
vania oil, October is behind the 
preceding month In all depart- 
ments of field work. While the 
decline is in no sense a large one, 
it seems to bear out the assump- 
tion that it is impossible any long- 
er to maintain the production of 
Pennsylvania oil without the open- 
ing up of new and unexpected 
sources of supply. October com- 
pleted 17 fewer wells than Sep- 
tember, and the decline in new 
production was 776 ban-els. At 
the same time there was a de- 
crease of sixteen rigs and 7 drill- 
ing wells in the amount of field 
operations. 

While the Trenton rock districts 
of Northwestern Ohio reveal an 
increase in new wells, new pro- 
duction, and new work, Indiana 
shows a decline in everything ex- 
cept drilling wells. The two dis- 
tricts as a whole completed 23 
fewer wells than in September, 
while the net increase in new pro- 
duction, consequent upon the gains 
in Ohio, was 64 barrels. The grand 
total of new rigs is an exact stand- 
off with September, while there is 
a gain of six in wells drilling. 

Five more oil wells were com- 
pleted in the Pennsylvania oil 
fields in September than in Aug- 
ust, and there was an increase of 
over 2,100 barrels in the new pro- 
duction. While the productive 
wells in all sections of the Penn- 
sylvania oil fields averaged nearly 
i8J^ barrels each in September, 
the August average was but 13^ 
and the July 15 barrels to the 
well. The October wells averaged 
about 17 barrels apiece. There 
were 40 more wells completed. in 
the Pennsylvania oil field in 
August than in July but there 
was a falling off in the new pro- 
duction. July completed 60 fewer 
wells than in June and there was 
an increase of 405 barrels in new 
production. In October, a year 
ago, 712 wells were completed and 
the new production amounted to 
7,329 barrels, about 14 barrels to 
the well when the 175 dusters are 
eliminated. A peculiar circum- 
stance is noted in the fact that the 
number of completed wells for 
October of the current year is 
exactly the same as for October, 
1901. 

Operations in the Pennsylvania 
oil fields suffered a decline of 17 
rigs and 6 wells drilling in Oct- 
ober. The September operations 
in the Pennsylvania oil fields re- 
vealed an increase of 37 rigs and 
three drilling wells. August op- 
erations made a gain of 27 rigs 
and 29 wells drilling over these of 
July and the increased activity 
was confined almost exclusively 
to the southwest and southeastern 
Ohio. July operations suffered a 
loss of 19 rigs and made a gain of 
two wells drilling so that there 
was a net decrease of 17. The 
new work at the close of October, 
1901, was composed of 378 rigs 
and 653 drilling wells. 



QYC.NBT HKTROLKCM CO 

<*P"» Itjo.ooo 

_- 5*-"° •*•«• •' *y 

Local* o- Fmoo manly. 

Director*— Cat*. I Pair, prcsdeat. lam w Pa*, 
loo. ttcr-pmWcst. Chu. A. La*, l/ea.urtr. John 
C. McRlrw, Kvttu 

OnVc — 561 Patron 

Td — Soma id. 

DOTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal alwk. 

r |i.l».TOhtvilii(.|iK, 1 llu j.ooo ian 
In Ktrn. Lo* Anrrlr. and SummrTlau.l 
with y> producing wtlla. oflu-rt • and director.- 
P \ Schcrmcrhore. prritdrnt: C H Ritchie. net- 
prcaldcnl; R D KoUnftoo. secretary and treas- 
urer: D M Schcrmerhorn and W S Morton. Prm 
ctpal office. Potomac building. La* Annie* Cal 
Tel. John 1381. 



Opportunities in a Lifetime A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. E. 



^TANDAKD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 

Capital $500,000 

Treasury Mock J.«>.ooo 

Location: oj acre* leased proren oil land in 
VcKlltrrck; So acre* owned In Coaling* near 
Home OH company. Fresno; trio acres owned ad. 
joining- oil well In Napa valley 

Leased 6000 acres ssphaltum land In Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltutn refinery erected 

Officers: K A Falkenbent. president: M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawaon, R P Chase. Col K I 
Knsign. 

Offices: 47J-7* Parrot! Building-, Sjj Market 
street. San Francisco. Cal. 



A. ZELLERBACB & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., • San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the Largest brock. Onr prices are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main. 1133. 



gr\r>>%rV\r»»^»>«»>>VVVrV*VN*>VSr>»VV\ 



NEARLY 200,000 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters * 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith. Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

Paci6c Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses ro Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Associat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



t*. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & H. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
110 Montfeemery St. San Francisco 
Branch Stores: 
Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. .- 



Headquarters School, GoTeriDent aid 
Oil Laids in California. 

School lao.lt may t>e taken from 160 to 640 term 
L.«mi« iNitm.1 in ail counttea in Slate. They te 
outre no cuntliiion u to rttJdeOCC on land or 
cultivation, and carry all minrniM .ml ,1- 



219 Crocker Building 
SAN FRANCISCO 






only ft 13 an • 

Hecu made in all the 

■ 
Farming K 



■oltdted Kfttabluhed 1885. 



a have 
ita oil district*. Now 
land* art adapted to 
' l.ntiti* anil are ihr 
latlon 111 (he Bolted 
1 Book and Circulars, 
■rreftpondence 



WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 

Los Angeles. California. 



If You are going East call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar fop 
Dollap," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 
e. o. Mccormick. t. h. goodman, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United States and 

Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 



Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa, 



SPKCIALTIRS 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. | 



San Francisco, Cal 



Fishing Tools 



For Rent 



PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

Largest Supply of Fishing Tools I No other company has all the odd 
in California Kept for Rent. sizes as we have. 



Phone, Black 1071, 



BAKBRSFIBLD, CAL. 



Thb Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mouoted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a Hurt uf 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make fuU line of Drilling and Pishing Tools, Reamers. Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON. OHIO. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTEk 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GilJ=Edged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased od very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected, Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at #40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, 



Stock Nonassessable. 
= $350,000 



475=476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our A 1 Refined Asphaltum 



American Steel & Wire Co, 



CHICAGO HEW YORK WORCESTER OEHVER SAN FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 
American Steel Wire Pumping Line 
American Steel Wire Tubing Line 
American Steel Wire Sand Line 



Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 
PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 




GITY SALES OFFICE 

8 and IP Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GEO. H. ISM0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. lO 



AGENCIES 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

E. R. ELDREDGE, Sales Agent O. D. COLVIN, Sales Agent 




Flexible Metallic Tubing 

The intelligent Mechanic will recog= 
nize "A GOOD THING" in FLEXIBLE 
METALLIC TUBING, a Reliable and 
Practically Indestructible Substitute 
for Rubber Hose for All Purposes. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices, It Will Pay You 




Fop 



Suction 

and 

Discharge Pipes 



© 



FOB STEAM 
OILS, GAS 
AND HYDRAULIC 
PURPOSES 



CHAS. C. 
MOORE 
&C0., 
ENGINEERS 

Contractors 
for 

Complete 

Power 

Plants 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Main 
Office 

32 First St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Branch 
Offices 

Los Angeles 

Seattle 

New York 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., DECEMBER 5, 1903/2^"^ 



Price 10 Cents. 







Goods 

Manufactured 
By the 



OIL WELL 
SUPPLY CO. 



Of 

Pittsburgh, 
Penna. 






FOR 



Drilling & Operating Oil & Gas Wells 

Are known and used throughout the world, because they are 
The Best That Can Be Made. 



Business Established 1861 

Have Ten Fully Equipped Manufacturing Plants 



Special Attention is Invited to the Superiority of their 

Boilers, Engines, Drilling Tools, Etc. 



SOLE AGENTS 

READING IRON CO.'S 
IRON CASING, 
TUBING, DRIVE and 
LINE PIPE 



Stocks of these Goods are carried 
by Dealers at 

Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, 
Bakersfield, 
McKittrick, 
Coalinga, Etc. 



H 



THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




BOSTON CASING 



<£> LINE PIPE 



<b> DRIVE PIPE 




b> TUBING 

As Manufactured by the 

NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through' 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAT.., FRIDAY. HKCF.MBKR 5, 1902. 



Pkiok, Ten ^ bnts. 



FLEET OF TANK VESSELS. 



The Number Engaged in Transporting Oil 
Rapidly Increasing. 



The Cost of Loading and Unloading Oil Much Less 

Than That of Coal and the Work is Done 

Much Quicker and Easier. 



The " Rosecrans," formerly in 
the'transport service, but recently 
purchased by the Matson Navi- 
gation company from the govern- 
ment, is now at the Union Iron 
works being transformed into a 
tank-steamer for the carrying of 
oil from the California fields to 
various Pacific ports. The altera- 
tions will not be completed until 
sometime in February. She will 
have a carrying capacity of 23,000 
barrels. There is only one larger 
tank steamer on the Atlantic, the 
"Julia", which has a carrying ca- 
pacity of 25,000 barrels. 

The "Argyle," 30,000 barrels, 
will be transformed into a tanker 
by January 15th and will transport 
oil for the Union Oil company. 

■ The same company is building 
the "Lyman Stewart," 10,000 bar- 
rels, to be used on the coast trade 
principally. She will be finished 
March 15th. 

The Pacific Coast Oil company's 
steamer "George Loomis" has a 
tank capacity of 6,500 barrels, and 
is used as a coaster. 

The steamer "Ascencion" is now 
being converted into a tanker, 
and will be ready for the Pacific 
Coast Oil company by January 
1st. She will have a capacity of 
21,000 barrels, and will be able to 
run anywhere. 

Besides these tank steamers are 
the barges "Santa Paula" which 
has a capacity of 8,200 barrels, 
and belongs to the Union Oil com- 
pany; and the new barge of the 
Standard Oil company, for use on 
the bay, and which will have a 
capacity of 6.000 barrels. This 
barge will be completed probably 
this week. 

Besides the above steamers and 
barges are the following tank 
sailing vessels. 

The "Marion Chllcott," owned 
by the Matson Navigation com- 
pany, left San Francisco Novem- 
ber 7th for Honolulu. It is her 
maiden trip as a tank vessel. 
She is equipped with twelve tanks 
and took on her maiden trip t6,- 
000 barrels of crude petroleum. 

The barkentine "Fullerton", be- 
longing to the Union Oil company, 
capacity 15,000 barrels. 

The total capacity of the oil- 
tank vessels now completed or 



approaching completion in San 
Francisco is as follows: 

NAMB. BARRELS. 

"Argyle" 30,000 

"Ascencion" at.ooo 

" Rosecrans" 23,000 

"Lyman Stewart" 10,000 

"George Loomis" 6,500 

"Santa Paula" 8,200 

" Standard Barge" 6,000 

"Marion Chilcott" 16,000 

" Fullerton" 15,000 

Total-.-...: i35,7oo 



the difference between oil and 
coal is most apparent, both as re- 
gards time and as regards cost. 

Oil is unloaded by pumping, 
and, if necessary, the oil can be 
pumped from the tanker straight 
into the storage tanks which may 
be situated a half mile or more 
from the wharf as is the case at 
Honolulu, where the vessel "Mar- 
ion Chilcott" pumps her oil cargo 
fully one half mile into the storage 
tanks. 

A collier has to be unloaded 
slowly and laboriously by means 
of buckets lowered into the hold 
of the vessel, filled by hand, raised 
by steam, and emptied into coal 
bunkers, whence the coal is hauled 
by cars or carts where it is de- 
sired. 

A big oil tanker can be unloaded 
in eight or ten hours, when from 
two to four days would be required 
in unloading a collier. 



THE COAST DIVISION. 



All ltd Engines Now Being 
Equipped as Oil-Burners. 

A general order has been issued 
calling in all the locomotives on 
the coast division of the Southern 
Pacific company to the shops to 
be equipped with oil burners. 
The supply stations along the line 
have been nearly finished and are 
about ready to supply fuel to the 
locomotives. 

The engines will be called in 
two at a time and in some cases 
where it is necessary three en- 
gines of the same class will go to 
the shops to be remodeled. This 
order was issued recently by the 
motive power department and it 
will not be long before all the en- 
gines cf the division will be 
equipped in first-class manner. 
The company recently finished 
converting the engines of the 




Tank Steamer "George Loomis." 

This was the first tank steamer on the Pacific Coast, and has been used in transporting oil from Ventura to the refineries 

of the Pacific Coast Oil Company, at Alameda and Point Richmond. 



As regards the cost of loading 
and unloading fuel into and from 
ships and steamers, the contrast 
between the cost of coal and fuel 
oil is very marked. 

The cost of loading fuel is usu- 
ally much less than that of un- 
loading. This is particularly so 
in the case of fuel oil. As a rule 
the storage tanks are located con- 
siderably above the vessel to be 
loaded and from two to six large 
pipes run from the storage tanks 
to the vessel. Through these the 
oil runs very rapidly, especially if 
helped along by powerful pumps, 
as is usually the case. 

A vessel carrying 26,000 bar- 
rels of oil can be filled in ten 
hours or less. 

Even if coal is loaded into a 
vessel by gravity by means of 
chutes as is sometimes the case, 
the cost of loading and the time 
required is much greater than that 
required for oil. 

It is in unloading, however, that 



Most of the oil thus far trans- 
ported for use as fuel is of the 
heavy kind which will average 
about 336 pounds to the barrel. 

Reckoned in tons it costs to un- 
load a tanker between 35 and 40 
cents a ton. 

A collier is unloaded at $1.25 a 
ton. In addition to this should be 
reckoned an extra expense of 
$1,000 a day an account of the tie- 
up of the steamer of from three to 
four days longer than is required 
for the tanker. 

From the foregoing it will be 
seen that not only has there be- 
gun to be formed a quite consid- 
erable fleet of oil tank vessels on 
the Pacific coast, but that the ex- 
pense of transporting oil by sea 
is far less than that of transport- 
ing coal. 

The oil situation in California 
never looked better. The demand 
for oil is increasing, the price is 
advancing, and oil stocks are soar- 
ing. 



Western and Bakersfield divisions 
from coal to oil burners and will 
now devote their attention to the 
engines of the coast division. 

The company has met with 
much success in the use of oil as 
a fuel, as it not only adds to the 
comfort and convenience of pas- 
sengers, but also cuts the fuel bill 
in two. With oil there are no 
cinders and with proper regulation 
there is no smoke. 

The Southern Pacific and the 
Santa Fe are the only roads in 
the United States that have ever 
used oil in locomotives and with 
the success they are meeting it 
may be adopted as a fuel on the 
principal Eastern roads. 

Experienced engineers claim 
that they can make faster time 
with oil owing to the little atten- 
tion it requires. The fireman can 
devote himself to other matters 
about the engine while running, 
thus insuring greater safety to 
the train. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



UNSATISFACTORY PAVEMENT 



Terrible Condition of Streets Paved with 
Bituminous Rock. 



Marked Difference Between Asphalt and Bituminous 

Rock Street Pavement and the Great 

Superiority of the Former. 



Several of the most important 
streets of San Francisco have been 
paved with bituminous rock dur- 
ing the last few years. 

Those not familiar with the 
kinds of pavements seem to think 
that pavements made from bi- 
tuminous rock are the same as 
those made from asphalt. All 
pavements look alike to them, and 
go under the common name of 
" asphalt." 

It so happens that in every in- 
stance where bituminous rock has 
been laid on a San Francisco street 
which is used for heavy hauling, 
the pavement has proved very 
unsatisfactory, and every such 
street is in a most frightful con- 
dition—full of deep chuck holes 
from one end to the other, making 
heavy freighting exceedingly diffi- 
cult, and rendering it exceedingly 
difficult to drive even very slowly 
over the street in a light vehicle 
without breaking springs, render- 
ing a wheel useless, or doing some 
other damage. 

These streets are called " as- 
phalt" streets instead of " bitumin- 
ous rock" as they should be called. 

The result is that asphalt as a 
pavement is condemned, when 
the pavement is no more asphalt 
pavement than it is adobe or 
macadam. But asphalt gets the 
blame, and the asphalt industry is 
done great injustice and receives 
undeserved attacks and criticism. 

What is the difference between 
bituminous rock and asphalt? 

Bituminous rock is a substance 
that is mined. It is a combination 
of liquid asphalt which has been 
forced up from below, generally 
by gas pressure, through the 
crevices of overlying shale, and as 
the liquid asphalt reaches the sur- 
face it becomes mixed with the 
surface deposits of sand, clay, 
gravel, etc., and forms a layer or 
succession of layers of various de- 
grees of thickness, from a foot to 
many feet, and extending over 
small as well as large areas. Ihis 
surface deposit is called "bitu- 
minous rock," and as such it is 
mined, brought to the cities, and 
laid upon the streets as " bitumin- 
ous rock" or "asphalt" pavement. 

The great trouble with this "bi- 
tuminous rock" is that it is not all 
of the same grade, even when 
taken from the same locality. 

Some of it is good, some bad. 
Some contains a greater propor- 
tion of asphalt than the rest. In 
some the asphalt is mixed with 
sand, while another lot contains a 
great deal of clay, earth or gravel. 

It can be carefully graded so 
that the quality is about the same, 
but in order to do this properly 
great care and no little trouble 
has to be exercised and it is sel- 
dom if ever done. As a result 
the pavement, when laid, is more 



having a surface to which the as- 
phaltum covering will adhere. 

If asphalt pavement is thus laid 
there will be, there can be, none 
of the objections urged against It 
which can be urged against bitu- 
minous rock, and when its value 
as a pavement is understood there 
will be no more pavements laid of 
bituminous rock. 



COAL AND OIL. 



or less spotted with greatly in- 
ferior material, which will not 
withstand the wear and tear of 
continual and heavy traffic, and 
chuck holes and broken wagons 
and carriages are the result. 

Asphalt pavement is entirely 
different from that made with bitu 
ruinous rock. 

Asphalt is made from either 
crude petroleum or is refined from 
liquid asphalt. 

Until crude oil was discovered 
so abundantly in California much 
asphalt was made by refining the 
bituminous rock, or in other 
words, by taking from the bitu- 
minous rock the sand, gravel, 
clay, and other extraneous sub- 
stances which had become mixed 
with it, and then, by refining the 
residue, which was practically li- 
quid asphaltum, a refined product 
was obtained which when proper- 
ly treated made an excellent pave- 
ment superior in every way to 
that made from bituminous rock. 
But the process was expensive. 
The raw material had to be put 
into the kettles again and again 
before enough refuse was melted 
out of it to render the product 
sufficiently pure. 

Now that vast deposits of liquid 
asphaltum have been discovered, 
and it is known how to reach 
them, handle them and treat them, 
a refined asphaltum ought to be 
placed on the market, which shall 
be infinitely superior to any here- 
tofore placed on the market and 
manufactured from bituminous 
rock. 

It is from the crude petroleum, 
however, that most of the asphalt 
is made that is sold in California. 
The very heavy oil found in the 
southern portion of the State, con- 
taining as it does a large percent- 
age of asphaltum, has been found 
to be especially adapted for the 
manufacture of a refined asphalt, 
which, when properly treated, is 
found to make a pavement that 
cannot be excelled. 

A pavement made of asphalt in- 
stead of bituminous rock ought to 
contain no "soft spots." It ought to 
withstand cold as well as heat; it 
ought not to crack, neither ought 
it to become soft. It should be 
able to withstand the heaviest of 
traffic, and should be as durable 
as any other pavement. When it 
wears out it can be replaced quick- 
ly and cheaply. 

The main things about a suc- 
cessful asphalt pavement are the 
mixing and the foundation. 

If an asphalt pavement has the 
proper quantities of asphalt, sand, 
cement, etc., and these are prop- 
erly mixed, the pavement should 
be firm amd even, having no soft 
spots, and having no tendancy to 
"crawl," or become wavy, or wear 
holes. 

The proper mixing, however, 
will be of no avail unless the as- 
phalt is laid upon a solid founda- 
tion, thick, firm and smooth, and 



Theory That Oil Is Coal In a 
Liquid State. 

W. W. Lewis, an old-time oil 
well man, writes a letter to the 
Riverside, Cal., Horticulturist, in 
which he advances the novel 
theory that oil is coal in a liquid 
state. A reason lor this is that the 
products of both are the same viz.: 
gas, oil, tar, colors, coke, etc. "The 
first lamp I ever owned," says Mr. 
Lewis, "was made to burn what 
was called liquid gas. It was made 
from coal or shale and afterwards 
was called coal oil. When oil was 
discovered in Pennsylvania the 
manufacture of it was discontin- 
ued, as making it from petroleum 
was cheaper. I am aware that 
geologists maintain that coal is a 
vegetable formation, and to prove 
it state that leaves and trees are 
found embedded in it. The same 
argument ought to hold that water 
or rock are vegetable because trees 
and leaves are found petrified in 
them, or we might say that the 
earth was of animal formation be- 
cause we find the bones of ani- 
mals in it. It is not strange that 
the tree should be susceptible to 
becoming either coal or rock ac- 
cording to its surroundings. There 
have been in the world's exist- 



ence lakes of oil, asphalt and beds 
of bitumen, and where the oil has 
oozed through and run over the 
surface of the ground, and trees 
and leaves have fallen into them 
and become carbonized. In fact, 
the finding them in coal only 
proves they did not belong there. 

" The process by which oil has 
become coal, the gasses have evap- 
orated and so the oil has become 
coal. It does not take long for oil 
exposed to the sun to become 
quite thick. It no doubt has taken 
ages for oi' to become coal, but 
the fact remains that it has done so. 

" Geologists tell us that where 
shale is found at the surface that 
the coal measure has been re- 
moved. Generally this is very 
true; coal is not ■ found under 
shale. This proves that the coal 
must have been in a liquid state, 
and so was carried off through 
the veins of the rock, leaving the 
shale at the bottom, owing to its 
being nearer than oil, laid there 
and become petrified into stone. 
Had it been solid coal it would 
likely have remained on top of the 
shale." 



A Saving in Oil. 

The steamer Strombus arrived 
in Boston October 12th from 
Cardiff, the first steamer arriving 
at that port coming ac:oss the At- 
lantic and using oil for fuel. The 
vessel in a stormy passage used 
550 tons of oil out of 1,200 tors in 
store. The owers estimated the 
saving in using oil instead of coal 
at $21 a day, saying nothing about 
the wages of fifteen fewer men in 
the engineer's department. The 
oil cost $8.75 a ton in the European 
port. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 75^-in., 5f6-in. and 
4^in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6 in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



COALINGA PIPE-LINE. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Union Oil Company Will Build to Mon- 
terey Bay. 



Enough Contracts Secured from Large Producers to 

Assure the Success of an Enterprise That Will 

Greatly Benefit the Coalinga Oil Field. 



At various times there has been 
talk of a pipe-line from the Coal- 
inga oil fields to tide-water, and 
now, it would seem that the long 
cherished hopes of those inter- 
es:ed in the Coalinga fields are 
about to be realized. 

For the past few weeks \V. L. 
Stewart, general manager of the 
Union oil Company, the rival of 
the Standard Oil company, has 
made frequent visits to Fresno, and 
has been in conference with the 
oil producers of that section. 

It is learned from an absolutely 
authentic source that the purpose 
of his visits was to see what in- 
ducement would be offered his 
company to build a pipe-line from 
the Coalinga fields to tidewater at 
Monterey Bay. The inducements 
the company wants are contracts 
from the producers lo ship their 
oil by the pipe-line for a number 
of years. A number of these con- 
tracts have already been obtained 
from the heaviest producers, and 
if sufficient oil has not as yet been 
contracted for shipment, it is con- 
fidently predicted that it will be 
obtained without difficulty. The 
sentiment expressed by a promi- 
nent and heavily interested pro- 
ducer in the Coalinga field states 
the case of all the producers. He 
said: 

'A pipe-line is the only salva- 
tion Of the industry. The Coal- 
linga district at the present time 
is corked up tight as a bottle. The 
railroad will do nothing — that has 
been demonstrated. There is no 
longer any reason for hope from 
that source. The railroad simply 
will not furnish cars. It is impos- 
sible to contract to furnish oil be- 
cause you cannot count on the 
ability to move it. A man cannot 
safely promise to furnish a barrel 
of oi a day. When the railroad 
company does furnish cars there 
is rank favoritism. Out of 188 
cars, one of the heaviest produc- 
ing sections received just eight." 

The proposed pipe-line will have 
its terminus at Moss landing, on 



Monterey bay. The undertaking 
will cost in the neighborhood ol 
$250,000. Thelinewill be 125 or 
1 30 miles in length, and will follow 
as closely as possible the county 
roads, to obviate right-of-way 
negotiations with many people. 

Another proposition that is also 
talked of a good deal in oil circles 
is a branch line from the Coalinga 
fields connecting with the Stand- 
ard company's pipe-line from Bak- 
ersfield to Point Richmond. At 
the present time this is merely 
talked of, but the Union com- 
pany's proposed line to Monterey 
is far beyond the "talked of" stage 
and well-informed and conserva- 
tive men believe it has now 
reached a point where it may be 
be said it is a "go." It will be the 
biggest thing yet for the oil indus- 
try of Fresno county. 

Mr. John Baker, Jr., the San 
Francisco sales manager of the 
Union Oil company, will neither 
affirm or deny the report that his 
company intends to build the 
pipe-line. The Increasing busi- 
ness of the company, however, 
demonstrates that something must 
be done very quickly in order to 
increase their transportation facili- 
ties for oil from the Coalinga dis- 
trict. 



BIG OIL LOCOMOTIVES. 



Immense Locomotives Purchased 
by the Southern Pacific. 

The two large compound loco- 
motives of the Atlantic type, re- 
cently purchased by the Southern 
Pacific company have arrived at 
the West Oakland yards and are 
the admiration of all the officials 
and employees. The locomotives 
are huge affairs, and tower away 
above their companions in- the 
roundhouse. 

The locomotives were built at a 
manufacturing shop at Baltimore, 
and are intended to sustain a 
speed of ninety miles an hour for 
several hours. One has been as- 
signed the number of 273, and the 
other 277. 

This is not the first locomotive 
of this type that the Southern Fa- 



cific company has purchased, as 
:.>1 of the same style were re- 
ceived at the yards some time ago 
and have been in continuous ser- 
vice since. 

One of the new engines will be 
detailed to haul the overland 
limited, and the other will prob- 
ably be commissioned to take the 
flyer. The new locomotives have 
not as yet been fitted with the 
Dew combination oil and water 
tenders, but it is understood from 
officials at the yards that within 
a short time these tenders will be 
attached to the engines. 



New Incorporations. 

The following articles of Incorporation 
were filed lust week in tin- office of the 
Secretary of State: 

Connecticut and California Oil n>m- 
panj . Principal place of business, Port- 
land, Me. Directors, J. C. Ward, 1:. G. 
Ward, H. Ii. Russ, B. E. Pierce and A. 
C. Montford. Capital stock, f 200,000, 
subscribed, #350. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 

RkpoRTmI. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

COMPANIES incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

STOCKsandBoNDSunderwrltten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 

To Whom It May Concern. 

Boulder, Colo., Oct. (i, 1902. 
This is to certify that O. H Jones, the 
oil locator of Los Angeles, Cal., located 
a well for the Otero Oil ami Gas corn- 
pan; in the Boulder, Colo., oil fields in 
May, 1902; that the same was drilled in- 
to oil September 1, at a depth of 1,765 
feet; that since September 3 we have 
been pumping 100 barrels per day. This 
was not near any other producing well. 
F. J. CRETCHER, Director. 



GOLD! 

Never Goes Begging 

It is always at par. You don't have to seek a market or 
discount your goods. You are not subject to the dictation 
or control of the trusts. Fort hese and many other reasons 
a good gold property is one of the best investments, and 
stock in a company having a gold property of proven 
merit, managed by men of honesty and mining ability, 
offers to the poor man one of the best avenues to 
independence. Such a proposition is the • 

Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owning the Hudson group of mines in the Big Bug Dis- 



10 



tricl, Arizona, surrounded by rich 
producing mines. To continue 
development a block of treasury 
stock is now being sold at 

Send for particulars. 



w. e. YOUNG & CO., 



CENTS 

PER SHARE 

Par Value $1.00 
Full Paid, 
Non-Assessable. 



Fiscal 
Agents 



628-630 Laughlin Bldg. 
BANK BEFERENCES Los Angeles, Cal. 






OIL AH Fully Equipped We Have 

WELL 



SUPPLIES 



EXCLUSIVELY 



** THE LARGEST STOCK * 



ON THE 



PACIFIC COAST 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




STORES 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners* Association- 



W. B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS 

One Year $2 5° 

Six Months i 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Monet should he 6ent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressedto Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-31-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal., 
as second-class matter. 

FRIDAY... DECEMBER 5, 1902 

As one result of the explosion on 
the "Pro- 
Fuel Oil Is Safe greso" the 
coal men 
are jubilant, and are already cry- 
ing: " I told you so. It only took 
a little time for fuel oil to receive 
its death blow." 

Their talk is nonsensical. 

Fuel oil is all right, and the ex- 
plosion on the " Progreso " has 
only brought into prominence the 
fact that there are two kinds of 
oil for fuel, good and bad, safe and 
dangerous. 

There is no fuel in the world 
better or safer than the right kind 
of crude petroleum. 

Fire Marshal Towe asserts: 
" Light oil from Coalinga explodes 
at a temperature of 50 to 60°, and 
the use of it in this city is confined 
to the gas works, the general use 
of oil that flashes below 110° be- 
ing prohibited. It takes a tem- 
perature of from 280 to 300° to 
explode the heavy oil. As the 
.heavy oil runs very slowly when 
unloaded there is a possibility 
that in some cases the light Coal- 
inga oil may be mixed with it, 
thus making it run faster. The 
mixture is likely to be dangerous 
and the authorities here seek to 
prevent its use. The explosion 
to-day need cause no alarm among 
the users of oil. Up to date 250 
plants are burning oil, that num- 
ber of permits having been grant- 
ed, and the use of oil at them has 
not caused an accident that did 10 
cents' worth of damage." 

A light, volatile fuel oil is dan- 
gerous, no matter how used. A 
light oil mixed with a heavy oil 
so that its gravity is lowered is 
just as dangerous. The same is 
true of a residuum mixed with a 
distillate to increase its gravity. 

While these oils are dangerous 
the true, natural, heavy crude pe- 



troleum is not dangerous, any 
more than is coal. 

The howl of the opposers of 
crude petroleum serves only to 
emphasize the fact that the selec- 
tion of crude petroleum for fuel 
must be attended with great care. 

Inspectors should be appointed 
who should see that the oil fur- 
nished manufacturers and steamers 
is of the quality claimed. 

If the sellers of crude oil are 
not honest they should be 
watched, and when convicted of 
furnishing consumers a dangerous 
quality of oil should be punished 
to the limit of the law. 

The recent terrible and fatal 
explosion seems to furnish an op- 
portunity that should be seized 
upon by the proper authorities, 
and some one be made to pay a 
heavy penalty for furnishing an 
oil for fuel on a steamship that 
under any circumstances was dan- 
gerous, but much more dangerous 
under those then existing. 

While oil as fuel may have re- 
ceived a setback, it is one that is 
only temporary, and only shows 
in a most emphatic manner the 
advantages resulting from the use 
of proper oil. 



STATIONS FOR OIL. 



Southern Pacific Will Soon Have 
a Complete System. 

Within a short time the South- 
ern Pacific company will have 
a system of complete stations 
where oil can be fed to its oil-burn- 
ing locomotives. For weeks gangs 
of men have been stationed at Be- 
necia, Vallejo and Port Costa con- 
structing and erecting a number 
of tanks that will eventually con- 
tain oil that will be fed to the oil- 
burners. The work is about fin- 
ished and by the time several 
other towns on the western divi- 
sion are furnished with the huge 
tanks, the Southern Pacific com- 
pany will have a complete system 
of oil-feeding stations. 

A gang, comprising about fif- 
teen men, will soon commence the 
construction of a large oil tank 
near where the new narrow gage 
pier will be built and the same 
gang has just finished building a 
number of smaller tanks in the 
southern part of the State for the 
company. 

Sacramento and Stockton are 
equipped with oil tanks and one 
has just been finished at Gait and 
added to these are the others that 
have been built and mentioned 
from time to time. 

The railroad officials state that 
the oil stations will not of a neces- 
sity be less that one hundred 
miles apart on an average, and on 
the desert and other places that 
demand it, the stations will not 
have to be less than two hundred 
and fifty miles apart, so great is 
the capacity of the new tenders 

When more oil-burners are in- 
troduced, it is figured that before 
1904 the Southern Pacific com- 
pany will have consumed not less 
than 6,000,000 barrels of oil. 



LOSS OF THE "PROGRESO." 



Great Explosion Due to the Criminal Use of 
Highly Volatile Oil. 



Sample of the Oil In the Possession of the Fire 

Marshal, Who Says It Was Furnished By the 

Union Oil Company, and Flashes at 101. 



On Wednesday, December 3rd 
the steamer "Progreso" lying at 
the wharf of the Fulton Iron 
works was wrecked by an ex- 
plosion of oil in her fuel tank. 

The steamer was practically 
torn in two, eleven men were 
killed and many more injured. 

The steamer had a gross ton- 
nage of 1,919, and had just been 
fitted up as a bulk oil carrier to be 
used on the Atlantic sea-board. 
The work was being done by the 
Fulton Iron works. She had six 
oil tanks, five being used for the 
cargo, and having a capacity of 
16,255 barrels. 

The sixth tank, located amid- 
ships, had a capacity of 1,940 bar- 
rels, which was to be used as fuel 
by the steamer. In this tank 
about 400 barrels of crude petro- 
leum had just been stored for 
use in the trial trip of the steamer, 
which was to occur on Friday. 

Suddenly and without the least 
warning the tank containing the 
oil exploded with terrific violence, 
and the burning oil thrown 
throughout the vessel at once 
spread death and disaster. That 
more were not killed by the rapid 
spread of the flames is marvellous. 

At once inquiries were made as 
to the cause of the explosion. 

These inquiries are now being 
pushed by the United States 
officials who have charge of the 
investigation. 

Some one is to blame for this 
terrible accident, and when this 
blame is finally and definitely lo- 
cated, the penalty meted out will 
be in" proportion to the magnitude 
of the criminal negligence dis- 
played, if such there was. 

At present the affair is more or 
less shrouded in mystery. 

That oil exploded in the "Pro- 
greso" there can be no doubt, but 
the cause of the explosion re- 
mains a mystery. Some say it 
was due to a lighted candle, a 
torch; others, to a hot rivet used 
in stopping a leak in the tank. In 
fact there are a dozen theories 
afloat, none of which are satisfac- 
tory. 

It is even a matter as yet to be 
definitely proved who furnished 
the oil. 

The Union Oil company officials 
decline to discuss the matter at all, 
but say they are ready to stand 
the closest investigation as to their 
part in the affair. They neither 
acknowledge they furnished the 
oil nor do they deny it, but de- 



clare that whatever oil they fur- 
nish for fuel purposes is absolutely 
safe and will stand the fire test. 

Fire Marshal Towe on Thurs- 
day afternoon stated emphatically 
that the oil in the "Progreso" was 
furnished by the Union Oil com- 
pany; that it was pumped into the 
tanks of the "Progreso" from the 
tanks of the tug "Sea Rover;" that 
a United States inspector obtained 
a sample of the oil; and that he, 
the Fire Marshal, made a careful 
test of it. 

He found it to be a mixed oil, 
exceedingly volatile and explos- 
ive, and that it flashed at 101 . 
He states that the oil was a mixed 
Coalinga oil. The Pacific Oil 
Reporter has been unable to 
obtain a sufficient quantity of 
this oil to make a careful anal- 
ysis, but its explosive character- 
istics are apparent, the smell alone 
being sufficient to warn anyone 
from touching a lighted match to 
even a small quantity. 

If the oil now in the possession 
of the Fire Marshal is a true sam- 
ple of the oil furnished the "Pro- 
greso," the cause of the explosion 
is at once apparent. The gas aris- 
ing in the tank would explode im- 
mediately if an exposed light was 
brought in contact with it. 

What the light was in the case 
of the "Progresso" is not and prob- 
ably never will be known. Un- 
doubtedly the man who held it 
perished; but the accident never 
would have occurred had proper 
and safe oil been placed in the 
tank. 

Coalinga oil used for gas- 
making explodes at from 50° to 
6o° temperature, and is not 
fit for fuel purposes. In fact no 
oil that flashes at less than no is 
safe. The sample taken from the 
tanks of the " Sea Rover" flashed 
at 101, and its use is attended 
with the greatest danger. Ordi- 
nary fuel oil explodes at from 280 
to 300 . 

If the oil furnished the " Pro- 
greso" was like the sample ob- 
tained by the United States in- 
spector it was dangerous to a 
marked degree, and should never 
have been furnished as fuel. 

If the Union' Oil company fur- 
nished this oil they are criminally 
responsible for the destruction of 
this valuable steamer and its at- 
tendant loss of life, and whoever 
is guilty should be held strictly 
accountable. 

If the Union Oil company is not 
to blame, someone else is, and 
that one, whoever he may be, 
should be held strictly accountable 
and made to suffer most dire con- 
sequences. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTKR 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 






Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries in the Far West. 



COl-i 
The casing is to be pulled in the last 
Smith 8k Gorrill well uu Sand Creek and 
another well will be put down in the hills 
farther west. It seems, from the amount 
of gas which constantly ascends from 
the last hole thnt it is onlj a question of 
the depth and number of the holes until 
oily fluid is l 

I-RKSNO. 

The Commercial will soon be pumping 
and also drilling more wells. 

San Francisco Crude enjoyed a similar 
experience about the same time. 

The oil men are busy preparing to 
pump old wells and sink new ones in the 
Coalinga district. 

Maine State had a little gusher for 
awhile, a few days ago, when a stream of 
oil shot above the top of the derrick. 

GLENN. 

Great excitement prevails at Willows 
among people interested in oil. It was 
learned last Saturday that oil has been 
struck by the Washington-California Oil 
company on the Nye ranch, fourteen 
miles west of Willows. For the past two 
months indications have been so good 
that crews have been kept working day 
and night. The well is now 2,000 feet 
deep, and it is claimed that at present it 
will produce from six to eight barrels 
daily. The oil is of the very best para- 
ffine quality. The operators of the well 
are confident that a great flow will be 
found at a depth of 2.000 feet. This be- 
ing the first strike of oil found in Glenn 
county, it has occasioned no little excite- 
ment. The value of land has greatly in- 
creased in the vicinity of the producing 
well. 

KERN 

The Arcada Oil company has erected a 
rig on section 31-32, 24, near the proper- 



tic, of the Lucky Hoy and the Sunset 
Queen Oil company. 

The I'cerlcss oil company has two 
wells, Nos. sand 17, drillltng' one down 
400 and the other 500, and a third, No. 
17. just rigging to begin operations. 

At Sunset the Raisin City Uil company 
has erected a rig on 3132, 24, ami tin 
Lone Star company operating in the 
same field has a rig en route to com- 
mence operations on another well. 

The Bit. Hoy, immediately south of 
the Bay City In the Midway, is 1 
Ing to drill another well. No. 1 is be- 
lieved to be good for between 75 anil too 
barrels, but it has not been put to a test 
severe enough to establish its capacity. 

A veriest wildcat of all wild-catting, 
says the Californiau, is the Webfoot 
company, operating in the Cuyama val- 
ley at the upper end near the mouth of 
Hallinger canyou. It is many miles from 
any successful well and an equal dis- 
tance from any successful venture. It is 
at a great distance from transporation 
and is proceeding at numerous disadvan- 
tages. Nevertheless, it is going down in 
a satisfactory manner, has a hole 500 feet 
in depth and as straight as a die, and as 
the people who organized the company 
are spending large sums of their own 
money, the nerve of it is admirable. 
Snch things have been common enough 
when the cash expended was paid in 
from everywhere for treasury stock, but 
the Webfoot stands outlined distinctly 
in a class all by itself. It deserves the 
success that its surface indications are 
said to show. 

LOS ANGELES. 

The Sespe Canyon Oil company last 
week struck oil at a depth of 615 feet, 30 
feet in the sand and the hole had filled 
up 450 feet with oil. 



on the fun it will 

have to be pumped a short time ' 
drilling can be rctum< 
encountered at a depth of hou feel, but 
the well is now much deeper. 

The Columbia nil company has fin- 
ished another new well, No. is, ami it is 
said it will make one of the best pro- 
dncersof high gr..\it> oil in the Fuller- 
ton field. It is a spoutcr, but lias not 
been tested to its full capacity, but a re- 
port says it is a good one. 

SAN HRNITO. 

The Watsonville Oil company has 
bought the rig. tools, etc., of the Gilro) 
Oil company, and will use the outfit iii 
drilling more wells near the well recently 
drilled by them on the Sargent ranch. 
This well, though tilled up, is good for 
25 barrels a day of 20 oil. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

Well No. 13 on the Western Onion 
lease came in last week Tuesday night at 
a depth of 1,560 feet. The drillers had 
been anticipating a strike for several 
days, and were prepared to cope with the 
flow as soou as the oil was struck. The 
well was started with ti^-inch casing 
and finished up with the 8-inch. Work 
on No. 14 began this week. 

The Pinal company has 900 feet of oil 
in its casing, which will be put under 
the pump in a few days. The machinery 
is already on the ground, and prepara- 
tions for marketing the product will be- 
gin at once. The high grade of oil will 
net the stockholders good returns. The 
Santa Maria Oil and Gas company, whose 
property is in line with theother success- 
ful companies, are drilling now at con- 
siderable depth and find excellent indi- 
cations for oil. 

The Brookshire Oil company has been 
incorporated with a capital stock of $500,- 
000, the promoters being some of the 
same parties interested in the Pinal com- 
pany. Patrick Moore is the president; 
Paul Tietzen of Santa Maria, vice-presi- 
dent. The company has purchased 180 
acres of land quite near the Pinal com- 
pany's holdings, paying for it with stock 
at the rate of twenty-five cents per share 
and we understand the balance of the 



is placed in the treasury to be dis- 

l'ln inch Oil and Develop- 

ment company struck oil near Shuiuan 
a last week. The amount of oil at 
this time is not known, but the fact that 
mpany has been drilling in a deep 
for Mine time anil frequently en- 
countered ,1s In the belief 
that it is the same bod) as underlies the 
Careaga ranch. The strike is of gn 
importance than made -is yet, for it 
proves the entire county along the south- 
ern extremity ol the Saufa Maria valley 
and makes it one of the largest oil fields 
in the Stale. 

VENTl IRA. 

The New ■ Wcldon oil company began 
drilling work last week Thursday on the 
llartmau place. The well is on the site 
of the old gas welt bored by Mr. Hart- 
man several years ago. The contract 
calls for a well 2,000 feet deep. Two 
thousand feet of pipe have been laid 
from the Barnard place to the well to 
supply water for the drilling. Work will 
he pushed as fast as possible. There is 
every indication thnt oil exists some- 
where in the locality, and the company 
hopes to strike a paying flow. 



Oil for Arizona. 

Arizona is increasing its con- 
sumption of California fuel oil. 
Operators in that territory are be- 
ginning to feel the effects of the 
great coal strike in the East, and 
prices of soft coal have advanced 
from 50 to 75 cents per ton. This 
advance is making the mine 
owners sore, and is causing many 
of them to turn their coal burners 
into consumers of fuel oil. Re- 
cently large orders for oil were 
placed in the California fields, and 
it is predicted that by the end of 
the year at least one-third of mines 
in Arizona will be using the Cali- 
fornia crude. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 



INVESTIGATION ™ INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Kern County, Cal., situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present-operations is in famous Section 2, Township II, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Well No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 cents A SHARE 



WILL LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that you act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value $1.00) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock, and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment. We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member California Petroleum Miners' Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and Postoffice Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

ELK HORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 



470-471=472 Parrott Building 



SAN F RANCISCO, CAL 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL AS FUEL. 



New Method of Using the New 
Fuel for Domestic Purposes. 

How to use crude oil for do- 
mestic purposes cheaply is the 
problem that those interested are 
devoting a deal of time and 
thought to solve. P. L. Linehan, 
who is an expert in this line, says 
that if he had a dozen cook stoves 
located in half a block he could 
introduce the crude oil for fuel 
and make a great saving. " But 
we have not been successful in 
finding a method to use the oil in 
a single stove without so much 
expense that no saving is secured. 
The oil will not burn and heat 
satisfactorily, except when it is 
under heavy air pressure, and 
there must be not only con- 
densed air but free air. The oil, 
so to speak, must be held in sus- 
pension in the air and then it 
works to perfection. Where there 
is a large plant, that is, where the 
consumption of oil is in amount 
to justify the use of an air pump, 
the problem is solved, for with 
the pump put in there is no 
further difficulty to be overcome. 
But for a single family the ex- 
pense of a pump and of power to 
operate it renders the use of the 
oil more expensive than other fuel. 

" I do not know when or how 
the problem will be solved but I 
am sure that it will be. There are 
many men studying the question 
and they will find some method of 
using the oil. 

" The saving by its use in an 



ordinary household will be enor- 
mous. By actual experiments we 
have found that this saving is 
fully 60 per cent over wood and 
coal. We installed a plant which 
operated eleven stoves. The cost 
of the oil for a given time, all 
stoves heated for the same hours, 
was J56 and for wood $36. 

" Our experiments show that 
cost for fuel in an ordinary family 
to do all the cooking and baking 
will be only about 1 }4 cents a 
day. This is a liberal allowance. 
The general public has no idea of 
the wonderful economy that can 
be effected when oil is used. It is 
not strange then that so many 
persons are working on the prob- 
lem of using it in the household 
stoves and heaters. 

" Of course we all know that in 
high pressure boilers the oil is 
now used almost universally in 
this State. A few cents for oil 
now does the irrigating that for- 
merly cost from $4 to $6 for wood. 

" I am satisfied that it will not 
be long until the housewife will 
go down town and order a can of 
crude oil for her cook stove in- 
stead of a cord of wood. 



GONE TO WASHINGTON. 



President Wright of the Peerless 
to Battle Against Scrippers. 

President J. M. Wright, of the 
Peerless Oil company, left for 
Washington and the East on Wed- 
nesday morning. 

He took with him the appoint- 
ment by the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association, to act as their 
representative in defending the 
rights of the oil men against the 



attempts of the- scrippers who 
have been and are now attempt- 
ing to fraudulently wrest away 
from them their land on the plea 
that it is agricultural rather than 
mineral land. 

Mr. Wright is not only as an oil 
man well acquainted with the 
situation between the scrippers 
and the oil men but is an attorney 
of established reputation, and is 
therefore peculiarly well qualified 
to undertake the important mis- 
sion to which he has been ap- 
pointed. 

Texas and California Oils. 

Official tests show very little 
difference between Texas and 
California oils. This fact is brought 
out in a report on the subject by 
the statistical department of the 
Santa Fe, which is using oil over 
a great part of the lines, after ex- 
haustive experiments as to the 
realative economy and benefits of 
oil and coal. The amount of oil 
used per ton per mile is very nearly 
the same, 0.3S0 pound in both 
cases. The amount per car mile 
is 2 percent and the evaporation 
is 3 percent in favor of the Cali- 
fornia oil, although the net gain in 
actual service is less on account of 
steam being used to heat the Call 
fornia oil in the tank. The Texas 
oil, being much thinner, does not 
require heating. 



Assessments. 

Commercial Petroleum com- 
pany, $2 per share; delinquent 
December 10. 

Fresno-San Francisco Oil com- 
pany, Fresno county, 3 cents per 
share; delinquent December 3. 

Mercantile Crude Oil company, 



Coalinga district, Fresno county, 
5 cents per share; delinquent 
November 20. 

Independent Oil company, Coal- 
inga district, Fresno county, 1% 
cents per share; delinquent De- 
cember 15. 

Esperanza Oil and Gas com- 
pany, Kings county, $2 per share; 
delinquent December 20. 

Clear Light Oil company, San 
Benito county, one -eighth of a 
cent per share, delinquent No- 
vember 28th. 

Rio Bravo Oil company, Kern 
county, one cent per share, delin- 
quent December 22d. 

Wellington Oil company, Kern 
county, two cents per share, delin- 
quent November 27th. 

California Combined Oil com' 
pany, Kern county, one cent per 
share, delinquent December 3d. 

Niagara Oil company, Devil's 
Den, Kern county, four cents per 
share, delinquent November 29th. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 



SOME MEN PAY 

$10,OOO foranex P ert toman - 

,age their advertis- 



ing. There are others who pay 
$5.00 f° r an annual subscrip- 
______ tion to PRINTERS' 



INK and learn what all the adver- 
tisers are thinking about. But even 
these are not the extu mes reached. 
There are men $100,000 

who lose over ,«■ , M 

a year by doing neither one. 
For sample send 10 cents to PRINTERS' 
INK, No. 10 Spruce St., New York City. 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that buys the oil and pays $1.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes IHB HIGHEST GRADK GASO- 
LINE, BENZINB AND KEROSENE OB ANY RBBINERV ON THB PACIFIC COAST. 


Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three. Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates 900,000 shares. 
We act as trustee fol this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will be taken up and the pooled 
stock ot the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus' if three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
1 payer the investment would still yield I2}£ percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 


$89 buys 100 Shares in each of lour companies, or 
400 shares full-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment. 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
33T percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 4 SO 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
900,000 shares held in trust by us. 


THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELDS. One cum- 
pany is pumping 52 gravity oil, selling it at $1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1,150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well ; third company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset, 
and land holdings, drilling rig, and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 




INDEX. 


The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

"There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52 Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, | 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade for illuminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity tkat has ever come to this State slip into comparitively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because they did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
! any speculative venture, but in actually proven lands, which can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $5,000 per acre, and which in a few 
years will be worth five times that price." 


























Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 


THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL OIL PROPOSITION : 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade oil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 


Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



TAMPING AND ROLLING. 



Improved Method of Treatment 
of Streets With Oil. 

Santa Barbara and BakersGeld 
have developed an improved and 
practicable method of treating 
roads and streets with oil. The 
dust nuisance was easily killed off 
completely, but the best roads 
possible have not always followed 
the use of oil, nor has the ground 
been properly prepared for its ap- 
plication. 

The California Dustless Road 
commission, started out simply 
with the idea of laying the dust 
during the long dry season, and 
the claim was made that there 
must be several inches of dry dust 
on the road and the oil must be 
applied as hot as possible. It has 
required two years' experience 
and experiment to show that by 
proper methods the dust may not 
only be laid, but a permanent, 
hard roadbed may always be ob- 
tained. 

In Santa Barbara the streets 
are first of all brought to a clean, 
round grade. The dirt is made 
fairly fine, a spading harrow be 
ing used. This grading does away 
with chuckholes and makes the 
street as even as possible before 
the oil is placed. 

Sprinkling with water follows 
the grading. On several blocks 
sprinkling was omitted to see 
what the effect would be. The 
best blocks laid are those where 
the sprinkling was done. The 
oil was heated in its car to make 
it run easily and was then hauled 
to the streets in a sprinkling cart. 
The cart is driven slowly over 
the street and the oil runs npon 
the surface. Then comes a sec- 
ond coating of oil. Harrowing for 
the third time mixes the oil well 
v,hh the earth, but gives the 
street a very nasty appearance. 

Next comes the roller, or tamp- 
ing machine. It consists of a 
roller of wood, into which are set 
rows of iron spikes each a foot 
long and having a head two 
inches square. The spikes por- 
ject about six inches. The roller 
rolls on the ends of these spikes 
and mashes the oil almost out of 
sight into the street. The treat- 
ment with this roller hardens the 
surface and permits the use of a 
heavy steam roller for the pur- 
pose of further packing and level- 
ing the streets. 

The amount of oil used was ioo 
barrels to a 450-foot block of 60- 
foot street. Travel on the streets 
has hardened them into almost an 
asphalt surface as the volatile 
parts of the oil have evaporated. 

In Bakersfield a section" of five 
blocks has been treated similarly. 
The spiked roller was used. The 
Californian says that the idea was 
Laken from noting the manner in 
which the many feet of a large 
band of sheep pack the ground 
where they travel. The oil is at 
once driven down into the soil 
and tamped there much- more 
effectively than by the various 
devices for harrowing over to mix 
with the dust. The oil in this 
case was simply heated enough to 
make it flow readily from the 
sprinkler and the soil was quite 
cold, but after the roller had 
passed over it twice scarcely any 
oil was left on the surface and 
wagons could pass over it at once 
without picking up a particle of 
the oil. This in Itself is a very 
important advantage, as one of 



the chief difficulties in applying 
oil to the surface of the roads has 
been that traffic could not be kept 
off long enough to let the oil soak 
away and wheels would carry 
away patches, making a bad 
chuckhole immediately. 

The tamping roller effectually 
disposes of that trouble, as it 
forces the oil into the soil so deep 
and solid that traffic can follow at 
once. 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Vast Deposits of Asphalt and 
Coal to be Sold. 
According to an agreement be- 
tween the Choctaw and Chickasaw 
nations, Indian territory, and the 
United States, the coal and as- 
phalt deposits and lands in these 
nations, not exceeding a half mil- 
lion acres, are .to be segregated 
by the secretary of the interior 
and, at the expiration of two 
years or before, sold at public 
auction by a commission appointed 
by the president. These coal and 
asphalt deposits and lands are to 
be located and segregated from al- 
lotment to the Indians by March 

25. I9°3- 

Mr. Joseph A. Taff, geologist of 
the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, has been detailed by the 
secretary of the interior to give 
the Dawes commission expert ad 
vice in the selection of the coal 
and asphalt lands to be thus segre- 
gated. Mr. Taff has for several 
years past been engaged in the 
Indian territory coal fields and is 
eminently qualified for this re- 
sponsible duty. 

The coal deposits occur in a 
number of beds, ranging in thick- 
ness from 2y 2 to 5 feet. The larg- 
est area lies in the northeastern 
part of the Choctaw nation. Other 
small areas occur in the no th- 
eastern and southeastern parts of 
the Chickasaw nation. These 
coals for the most part are high- 
grade bituminous. Some of the 
eastern part of the field ap- 
proaches anthracite in composi- 
tion, yet are coking coals. The 
asphalt deposits of value occur in 
the central part of the Chickasaw 
nation. 

An Oil Smelter. 

The Prospect, of Prescott, Ari- 
zona, says: The newly erected 
hydro-carbon smelter, the in- 
vention of Martin P. Boss of San 
Francisco, has started their ma- 
chinery for a first trial, to see if 
anything would run smoothly, 
and the Prospect learning of the 
fact sent a man down to Mayer to 
report on the manner in which it 
acquitted itself, and also to take 
some notes on the smelter itself. 
For this hydro-carbon smelter is 
the only one ever built of its kind, 
being an oil, instead of a coke 
burner, and should it prove a suc- 
cess a shout would go up from all 
smelting men in the country. The 
process is finished with less than 
half the work or time that is re- 
quired by a coke burner, in fact it 
is simplicity itself. The hot blast 
is applied from the front of the 
furnace through three oil burners 
fed from a 43,000 gallon cistern 
100 yards north of the works. 



OIL-HEATING STOVE. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



A Simple Dc»ice That Answers 
B\ ery Purpose. 

Take any old-fashioned, cast- 
iron, oblong stove, that is dear at 
$5. It is the oil-burner, if burner 
it can be called, that deserves at- 
tention. There really is nothing 
to the burner except some air 
holes and a good draught. The 
oil is fed into the front of the 
stove just where the air enters, 
and as soon as the fuel is ignited, 
a fire results that discounts any 
other for steadiness of heat that 
has yet been seen. 

The draught drives the flame 
back through the space beneath 
the door and into the stove which 
is filled with bricks, and in ten 
minutes or less the stove is red 
hot if so much heat is desired. 
The amount of oil is easily regu- 
lated, and a steady heat can be 
had that keeps the room at an 
even temperature throughout the 
day. 

In the Californian building the 
stove in question is lighted at 7:30 
in the morning and burns until 
5:30 in the evening. During that 
time, says the Californian, it con- 
sumes about three gallons of dis- 
tillate, which suffices to keep warm 
a basement 42x87 feet. Those fa- 
miliar with wood stoves can readi- 
ly figure the amount of fuel that 
would be required for the same 
service. For this latest stove it 
should be said that there is an ab- 
sence of the noise so common in 
other oil-burners, and that it is ab- 
solutely safe, there being no 
chance for the oil to run over on 
the floor. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A Snap 

if taken advantage of at once. 

A Standard oil well boring out- 
fit complete. Now situated in the 
Colusa field for sale cheap or 
open to other propositions of great 
advantage to the right party. 
For particulars address, P. O., 
Box No. 132, Corning, Cal. 



A BONANZA 
INVESTMENT 



The Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refin= 
ing Company, 

of California, has the largest and most valuable deposit 
of LIQUID ASPHALT yet discovered in this country; 
has its own REFINERY of over 400 barrels daily ca- 
pacity, which was started up on November 1st, and as 
the asphalt produced contains several by-products of 
great commercial value, the company should be able to 
earn and pay very heavy dividends, in fact, so large as 
to warrant the stock advancing to par in the next few 
weeks, and probably to several hundred per cent pre- 
mium by the first of the new year. The stock is now 
selling at only 4 l A CENTS PER SHARE (£45 per thou- 
sand) which is just 45 cents on the dollar, and the 
FIRST QUARTERLY DIVIDEND HAS BEEN 
PROMISED FOR JANUARY 1ST. Invest now and 
have your stock share in the first dividend. Write or 
call at once for reports, photographs of the refinery and 
the fullest information. 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 



2 KILBY ST., = = BOSTON, MASS. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

Wednesday, Decbmbbr 3, 1902. 

Business on the Board has been more 
active daring the week just passed than 
for some time previously. Trading, 
however, has been confined almost en- 
tirely to a few of the leading stocks. 

The mild sensation of the week has 
been the advance in Monte Crista from 
$I.I2>£ on last Wednesday to $1.50 on 
Monday morning. In the afternoon ses- 
sion of the same day, the price broke 
under sales of less than 1,500 shares, and 
the stock sold down quickly to $1.37^. 

It is now quoted $1.32^ bid and $ 1.40 
asked. No reasonable cause can be as- 
signed for this fluctuation, and it looks 
like manipulation, and as though there 
were buying orders in the market. 

Peerless has announced dividends for 
January and February of 10c. per share 
in place of 8c, but despile this increased 
rate the stock is weaker, a few shares 
going over the Board this afternoon as 
low as $11.00. 

Kern is stiffer at $3.85 bid. Four has 
advanced, and 55c. is now freely offered. 
Some little Monarch has changed hands 
at 19c, an advance over last week. 
Sterling during the week sold up to 
$1.72^, but is again a little off. Twenty- 
eight has advanced, sales being effected 
at $1.55. Reed crude is quoted at 30c— 
31c. , hardly up to the price in Los An- 
geles. A good deal of Independence 
has been purchased at 6c; the assess- 
ment of i^c. a share will be added to 
the price of this stock on Monday next. 

A cheap stock that is attracting some 
little attention is Apollo on section 4, 
Kern River. Holders have raised their 
limit considered recently, and the pres- 
ent condition of the company seems to 
warrant the advance. 

In miscellaneous securities, S. F. Gas 
& Fylectric is somewhat better while 
Northern Calif. Power and Truckee El- 
ectric are slightly weaker. 

Sugar stocks continue firm, with an 
advance in Honolulu and Makaweli of 
several points. 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 3: 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 

700 at $ 13 $ 91 00 

CENTRAL POINT CON. 

500 at 65 325 00 

FOUR. 

1,000 at 55 550 00 

2,000 at 53 1,160 00 

500 at 53 (B90) 26500 

HANFORD. 
2 at 90 00 , 180 00 

HOME OIL. 

100 at 2 90 290 00 

100 at 2 85 285 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

06 (B 10) 30 00 

06 (B 30) : 24 00 

06 552 00 

06 (B 90) 12000 



43,064 Shares Amount $27,476 00 
HDTCHIN SON-SUGAR. 
20 at 15 62X I 312 50 



500 at 

400 at 

9,200 at 

2,000 at 

1, 100 at 



05- 



500 00 



SAN JOAQUIN O. & D. CO. 



50 at 
50 at 

75 at 

100 at 
900 at 

1,500 at 
100 at 
500 at 
300 at 
100 at 

1,100 at 
500 at 
100 at 



7 25 362 50 



7 00. 



SOVEREIGN. 



350 00 



28. 



500 at 



STERLING. 

1 70 (C) 170 00 

1 72'A (B 30) 1,552 50 

1 70 2,550 00 

1 70 (B 30) 170 00 

1 70 (B 4) 850 50 

1 7«K 517 5° 

1 65 (C) 165 00 

1 65 1,815 00 

1 67^ 837 50 

1 70 (B 90) 170 00 

THIRTY-THREE. 

7 50 75° 00 

TWENTY-EIGHT, 

t 55 775 00 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L. CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. 8.EWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



TblBphonB Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building. . Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
FraDcisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second FtooR, Mms 

Buixding, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 38s, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, S. F. 



10 at 
2 at 



600 at 



100 at 
100 at 
200 at 
100 at 
100 at 

1,250 at 
900 at 
100 at 

1,750 at 
200 at 

1, 100 at 

ioq at 

15 at 

100 at 

200 at 



140 at 
50 at 



7> 50 
14 00 



114 00 



KERN RIVER OIL 

7 25 

7 00 

MONARCH. 

19 

MONTE CRISTO. 

1 35(S9o) 135 00 

i 40 (S 90) 140 00 

1 42^ (S 90) 285 00 

1 35 (S 30). 135 00 

I 22'/i 122 50 

1 35 1,687 50 

i 40 i, 260 00 

I 32'A 132 50 

1 37 J£ 2,406 25 

1 50 300 00 

1 47^2 1,622 50 

1 45 145 00 

1 15 1,725 00 

1 27^ 127 50 

I 42 '/i 285 00 

PEERLESS. 
12 00 1,680 00 

II 00 550 00 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 



ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 

ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ, 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 385 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Monarch" (of Arizona). 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"United Tonopah" and "Montana Tonopah." 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Brunswick." 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Write to the undersigned for information regarding Oil and 
Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, returning 10 
percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



PEERLESS Oil, COMPANY— ON DECEM- 
ber 1st declared a dividend No. 9, of ten (10) 
cents per share, payable January 1, 1903. Books 
close December 26, 1902, 

The addre=s of stockholder W. I. Taze is desired. 
GURDON BRADLEY, Assistant Secretary. 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write d. D. Johnston, 
Newport, R. I. 




Business College and 
School of Engineering 



PETROLEUM CENTER. 



200 at 

600 at 

100 at 

2,000 at 

s. : 

70 at 



03 

REED CRUDE. 

32 

3i 

30 



6 00 



192 00 

3 f 00 

600 00 

& McKITTRICK OIL. 

25 ' 87 50 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

LOMA PRIETA PRUNE RANCH COMPANY, 
Location and principal place of business, 
San Francisco, California. Location of ranch. 
Monterey County, California, 

Notice is hereby given that at the meeting of the 
Board of Directors held on the 10th day of Nov- 
ember, :oo2, an assessment of five (I5.00) dollars 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in Uniled 
States Gold Coin, at the office of ihe Secretaiy, 
3331 Washington St., San Francisco, California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 10th day of December, 
1902, will be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Friday, the gth day ol 
January, 1903. to pry the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

FRANK MORTON, Secretary. 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughting, 
Strength of Matenals, and Surveying. 

THE MIMING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis, Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Mining, Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics. 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
Practical, Work Shop and laboratory Practice. Construction, Mechanical Drawing, Mathevnatics, etc. 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of abusiness education. Day and Evening Classes. 

fi^ 3 Write for new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 




X ^ \ \ \ \ \ 
For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Kig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench j^S'SSKMS 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 
MANUBACTURBD BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



r«l.'IMC OIL. KiM'UKlhn 



II 



SHASTA COUNTY OIL. 



Two Companies Have It la Small 
Quantities. 

In Shasta county a year or so 
ago nineteen oil companies were 
incorporated, but only three of 
them got as far along as purchas- 
ing rigs and drilling. These were 
the Keswick Crude, the Mt. Shasta 
and the Shasta Consolidated. 

The Keswick Crude, operating 
on the sand flats east of Keswick 
and north of Redding, drilled j2o 
feet, lost its tools, and couldn't 
fish them out. It had oil when 
the accident happened, as much 
as ten or twelve barrels a day. 
The water was not cased off and 
the oil was of course not saved 
except in samples. Despairing of 
fishing out the tools, a second well 
was drilled six feet to the east of 
the first. This had reached a 
depth of 320 feet when it was 
abandoned because the company 
was out of funds. The financial 
management has been bad from 
the start. Although the stock 
was advertised as non-assessable, 
being incorporated under the Ari- 
zona laws, a i-cent assessment 
was levied, $1,400 collected and 
then delinquent stockholders were 
forgiven and allowed to retain 
title to their stock. The company 
is being sued in the courts on a 
claim of $900 for labor. Its affairs 
are in a badly tangled shape, 
which is unfortunate in view of 
the good prospects it had. 

The Mt. Shasta company drilled 
a hole 300 feet deep only a few 
rods east of the Keswick Crude, 
and then suspended operations as 
the company had other properties 
in Napa county which required 
immediate attention. It wiil soon 
begin to sink the well deeper and 
reach the oil stratum which the 
Keswick people struck. 

The Shasta Consolidated over a 
year ago drilled a well 998 feet 
deep twelve miles east of the sand 
flats region. At that depth it 
found oil which amounted to 200 
or 300 barrels a day, but was not 
cased off. The company lost its 
tools. Recently they have been 
fished out, and work of boring 
the well will soon be resumed. 

It would be a great boon to 
Shasta county and all northern 
California if oil should be struck 
in that region. The great mis- 
fortune in the prospecting done 
there has been that the companies 
have not had enough cash to 
carry on the prospecting work 
thoroughly to any great depth. 



I that will be restored no one would 
1 now undertake to exploit for oil 
'and no one not after oil has any 
use for them. 



/HGNKT PKTROLHUM CO 

CaplUI IIJO.IXK 

5,0.000 aharea at $j. 
I Location— Fresno county. 

Putctors— Chaa. L Fair, prcaidcnt. Rills W Pas 

Ion. vtct-prcaldent, Chaa. A. L«, treasurer. John 

C. McKlroy, secretary. 

Office— 56! Parrolt Building. 

Tel South 184. 



s 



TASOAKD rock Oil. company. 



Will Again Grade Land. 

Captain Cummings, upon whose 
recommendations much of the sup- 
posed oil lands were withdrawn 
from entry several years ago, is 
again to investigate the same ter- 
ritory. He will pass upon the 
lands once more, this time in the 
light of the knowledge developed 
by the drills and wherever it has 
been disclosed that there is no min- 
eral (oil) on the public domain, the 
land will be thrown open to settle- 
ment. Captain Cumiuings' work 
will result in officially determining 
whether or not the land is oil land. 
Not much of a stir will be created, 
however, as the information the 
government will gain is already in 
the possession of the public and 
has been acted upon The lands 



Capital Isoo.oco 

Treasury stock 1 150.000 

Location: t» acres leased proven oil land In 
McKillrlck; 80 acres owned In Coalings near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
jominn oil well In Napa valley 

Leased 6000 acres aaphalturo lend In Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Palkenberg, president: M 1 Hen- 
ley, secretary; I) B Clawaon, R P Chase, Col B J 
Ensljrn 

Offices: 475-76 Perron Building, 855 Market 
street San Francisco. Cel. 



A. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

410, 418. 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St.. San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the Largest stock. Our prices are 
Kq tillable. 

Tel. Main. 1133. 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters J 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. . 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use n Smith Pre- 
miers. 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Associat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers 

Gunnison. Booth &. Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. ' 

Descriptive Art Catalogue- Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & !». ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 

110 Montfeemery St. San Francisco. 

Branch Stores: 

Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. 



Opportunities in a Lifetime 

Headquarters School, Government and 
Oil Lands in California. 

may l»e taken i ■■ acre 

L*na» abound in Mil count)?* in State. They ic- 
,11: r 110 condition- aa to residence on land or 
cultivation, and car rv all mineral* und ■'. 
only $ 1. as an acre. Easy term*.. Fortune's have 
been made in nil the California oil districts. Now 
la your opportunity. School lands arc Ida.] 

lg, Ranching. Timber Land* and nre the 

■nd Cheapest Speculation in the United 

States for i.nnd Book and Circular*. 

I lands to offer. Correspondence 

solicited. Established 1885. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BIREAl 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



If You are going East call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar fop 

Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal Until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 
e. o. Mccormick. t. h. Goodman, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United States and 

«aaaaa.»^a««a^a™ Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 



Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



A. S. COOPER, C. E., M. E. 

219 Crocker Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 

23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. ) 

San Francisco, Cal 



W. E. YOULE 



m 




CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

: Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil Lands and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Present Address; 

Arbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a linrt of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etv 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON. OHIO. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTEk 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GiIt=Edged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

6000 ACRES 0000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected, Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETBD. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, = 



Stock Nonassessable. 
$350,000 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 



American Steel & Wire Co, 

CHICAGO NEW YORK WORCESTER DERVER SIR FRANCISCO 



Manufacturers o? 




American Steel Wire Drilling Line 
American Steel Wire Pumping Line 
American Steel Wire Tubing Line 
American Steel Wire Sand Line 
Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 



PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 

GITY SALES OFFICE 

8 and 10 Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GEO. H. ISM0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. lO 



AGENCIES 
I*>s Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

E. R. ELDREDGE, Sales Agent O. D. COI.VIN, Sales Agent 



CHAS. C. MOORE & CO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



Engineers complete power plants 

*"***^*** VVl *» Machinery of the Highest Grade 




Geipel Steam Traps 

Always Closed when Steam 

is in the Brass Pipe. Always 

Open when Water is in the 

Brass Pipe. 

Guaranteed Positive in its 

Action. 




Main Office 

San Francisco, Cal. 

32 First Street 



Branch Offices 
NEW YORK 1303 Havemeyer Bldg 
LOS ANGELES 103 S. Broadway 
SEATTLE 218 Second Ave. So 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., DECEMBER 12, 1903. 



Price 10 Cents. 



OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 

P ITTSBUR G H, PA, 

MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING REQUIRED 

To Drill, Equip and Operate OIL, GAS and WATER WELLS 
BOILERS, ENGINES, DRILLING and FISHING TOOLS 
MANILA & WIRE ROPE, CASING, TUBING, DRIVE & LINE PIPE 

COMBINATION OUTFITS 

INTERCHANGEABLE FROM STANDARD CABLE DRILLING TO THE 
HYDRAULIC ROTARY SYSTEM, SHIFT MADE IN A FEW MOMENTS 
FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER. 

CABLE SYSTEM FOR HARD ROCK FORMATIONS, HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
FOR QUICKSAND & CLAY, COMBINATJON OUTFITS for any condition. 





IMPERIAL WORKS, Oil City, Pa., one of the OIL WELL SUPPLY CO.'S numerous Man'f g Plants. 



THE COLUMBIA STEEL DRILLER. 



THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 



.. ;>i 







BOSTON CASING 



SSSSSSSSSSSBSSSSSBSBS^^S 



<£>LINE PIPE 



<^> DRIVE PIPE 




b> TUBING 

As Manufactured by the 

NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



SSS'SSSSSSBSSSSSSSSSSSSS'S 



For sale by Jobbers of OH Well Supplies Through 8 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., FRIDAY, DECEMBER ia, 1902. 



N > BNTS. 



THEORY VERSUS PRACTICE. " sed '^--^ il -«^™ 

them completely. 

He was told that was non 

his business; that the naval de- 

Certaln Things About OH on Which There partment had scientifically ex 

iS Sharp Controversy. amined these oils and was con- 

vinced that a ceitain kind of oil 
was the article needed, and that 

Does the Man Who Sits in the Chair of Science Know the oil men were re q ues *ed to bid 

on that one variety. 

The oil man again remonstrated 
against the use of this oil, and 
finally said that if it was used on 
the transports each engineer, on 
Sometimes one is 'arriving at Mania, would refuse 
to make the returu trip with such 
oil, and the government would be 
obliged to purchase other oil at 
three or four times the price 
charged in San Francisco. 

Finding the government refused 
to listen to his advice the oil man 
refused to bid on this variety of 
oil Another dealer sold the gov 



More About Oil Than the Man Who Refines, 
Uses op Transports It? 



Since the explosion of fuel oil 
on the Frogreso there has been a 
great increase in talk, newspaper 
as well as verbal, about the dif- 
ferent characteristics and quali- 
ties of the various fuel oils, espe- 
cially as regards the difference 
between the heavy and light oils. 

Without going into the dis- 
cussion scientifically, or using any 
technical terms It may be stated 
as a starter that the truly scientific 
man and his tests are worth very 
little as regards stamping oil good 
or bad for any purpose, fuel, re- 
fining, lubricating, or anything 
else. The trouble is that most 
chemists are scientists, and have a 
theoretical rather than a practical 
knowledge. To obtain the best 
results a chemist should be able to 
make a practical, commercial test 
of oils. 

A man may drill a well, strike 
oil, take a sample to a chemist 
and ask him what it is good for. 
The chemist may analyize it with 
greatest care and correctness, 
and from the result report that 
the oil will yield such and such 
a per cent of illuminating oil, for 
example. The oil man believes 
the chemist was correct in his 
report, and sends a ten or twenty 
barrel lot to a refinery to have 
a practical commercial test made, 
the result of which may show 
that the chemist was entirely at 
fault in his report, and that the 
oil is not nearly as valuable as he 
said it was for refining purposes. 
Little illuminating oil was ob- 
tained, and that which was ob- 
tained was obtained at double the 
cost of what it was worth in the 
market. 

The chemist was correct so far 
as his scientific and chemical 
analysis was concerned, but when 
the oil was submitted to the prac- 
tical refiner, the latter was un- 
able to get from the crude article 
the amount of illuminating oil 
called for by the expert chemist. 

Science said the crude oil was a 
first-class illuminating oil. Prac- 
tical test showed it was not. 

Cases like this can be enumer- 
ated without number, and the 
result is the chemists and the re- 
finers are often at outs, and do 
not value each other's opinions 



to 



very highly 

wrong, sometimes the other. 

The same is true in regard 
manufactured oils. 

Take the matter of lubricating 
oils. 

Two years ago a naval officer, 
an expert chemist and scientist, 
made a careful analysis of differ 
ent oils to find that best suited for 



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it/ 

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j <i- S. S. i. £. £. tttt*' -2-2 -S ^ ^ -2 .2 -2 -i -2 v 



OUR NEW YEAR'S EDITION. 



The annual New Year's edition of the Pacific Oil 
Reporter will be published January 3rd. 

This edition will be noteworthy among oil publi- 
cations which have heretofore appeared, not only on 
account of its beautiful appearance, but more espe- 
cially on account of its contents 

It will contain a number of special articles from 
those prominent as scientists, geologists, practical 
drillers, and successful oil men generally. 

It will cover every oil district in the State. 

It will be bjautifully illustrated with half tone re- 
productions. 

It will contain statistical information that will be 
exact and reliable. 



\\S 

it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
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(♦> 









use on the engines in the trans- 
port service. He reported just 
what the different samples con- 
tained, and concluded that such 
and such a sample was the identi- 
cal thing needed. The price cut 
no figure in the case at all. It 
was science — chemical analysis — 
that had determined what was 
the best kind of oil should be pur- 
chased for the United States trans- 
port service. 

Immediately the different oil 
men were notified to put in bids 
on this particular kind of engine 
oil. 

One of the largest dealers in oil 
on the coast went to the quarter- 
master in charge and told him 
very frankly that the kind of oil 
wanted by the naval authorities 



ernment an immense quantity of 
the oil demanded, all of which 
had to be thrown away, as the 
engineers could not and would 
not use it, and the government 
was forced to buy oil at Manila at 
exceedingly high prices. 

Here again science comes up 
against practical experience, and 
science was found to be wrong. 

The same is true in regard to 
fuel oil. 

Recently a report was made as 
to the relative values of oils for 
fuel purposes. One oil was of 20° 
gravity, the other 16 . 

There is no need of going into 
particulars as to the report, which 
was very scientific and abounded 
in technicalities and figures that 
only a scientist or advanced en- 
gineer could understand. 

One part of the report, which 
was true, was neverheless mislead- 



., „,.„iing. It was this, viz.: That A 

was not suitable for the purpose 6 *«.«_.• •-«. -1 u 

. • v pound of the light oil would evap- 

intended. If used it would prove i Qrate more water than A POCND of 

to be sticky and dirty, and would ; the heavy oil. 

greatly injure the engines. If That report was trup, and is to- 



day being shown as a reason why 
the ill of a certain company is 
better than the oil ol a certain 
other company. 

The report is true, and it is also, 
strange to say, false. 

A poind of this light oil will 
evaporate more water than a 
pound of the heavy oil. 

On the other hand a BARREL of 
the heavy oil will evaporate more 
water than a barrel of the lightoil, 
The scientist is right, but he is 
likely to give the ordinary man a 
wrong impression. 

The scientiest deals in oil in 

POUNDS. 

The ordinary man, the con- 
sumer, deals in oil iu hark 

A barrel of the heavy 16 oil 
weighs a good deal more than the 
light 20 oil and as a consequence 
there is more oil in a tound of the 
20 oil than in a pound of the 16 . 
Consequently the 20 oil makes a 
better showing than the 16° oil 
when compared by weight. 
By barrel the iesult is different. 
The consequence is that while 
the scientist, who reckons by 
pounds, says the light oil will 
evaporate more water in the boil- 
ers than the heavy oil, the engi- 
neer, who uses the oil, and the 
consumer, who pays for the oil by 
the barrel, declare that the sci- 
entist is wrong, and stick to the 
use of the heavy oil. 

Here again science and practice 
are at outs. 

The same is true in regard to 
the explosive quality of oils. 

The scientist will tell you, at 
least they have told the writer, 
that the flash test does not prove 
that oil is more or less liable to 
explode, and that, as a matter ,of 
fact, an oil which has a very low 
flash point may be much safer 
than' one that has a high flash 
point. 

He may be right, but the sea 
captain that has on board a cargo 
of oil thinks the learned chemist is 
wrong, and when he has a certain 
kind of oil on board in bulk, slosh- 
ing around in four or five big 
tanks his life is made somewhat 
strenuous by anxiety. The rules 
against fire rigorously are enforced. 
No one can smoke on deck, no one 
can carry a light, in fact no light 
is allowed on ship except electric 
lights. Where lanterns are re- 
quired they are of the electric kind. 
One well-known sea captain in 
San Francisco said last week: 
"If it comes to shipping this high- 
grade 20 oil in my tank vessels I 
shall refuse to do it. I do not be- 
lieve life or property should be 
endangered that way. 

"This oil is to be used for fuel, 
and the opinion of experts to the 
contrary notwithstanding, I want 
to say right here that no 20 oil is 
to be shipped on my vessels. If I 
have the oil — enough of it, I shall 
have it run through a refinery and 
the volitile part taken out, leaving 
a residuum of 16°. That is safe 
to ship under ordinary circum- 
stances and lighter oil is not safe 
to ship." 

The captain ought to know. So 
had the scientist. One says 20° 
oil is safe. The other says it isn't. 
Which is right? 

Ask the men on the "Progreso" 
which exploded last week. They 
might have an opinion. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL AS FUEL FOR NAVY. 



Experiments 



On Various Warships Very 
Encouraging. 



Advantages of Oil Over Coal Enumerated.— Exper- 
iences in Trials in Various Foreign Countries. 
Interesting Results Obtained. 



Is oil to supersede coal in pro- 
pelling the fleets of the world? 
All fuel questions are no w of in- 
terest. It is too early to say that 
the world's navies are abandoning 
coal, but the experiments which 
have been carried on in different 
parts of the globe give great 
promise for the future. One thing 
which has stood in the way of 
rapid adopting of oil-burning fur- 
naces, and that is the limitation 
of the supply of oil to certain 
countries, which, in time of war, 
might cut off the resources of their 
enemies. But this objection is 
rapidly disappearing in the face of 
discoveries of oil fields in new 
places. Crude petroleum, with 
either an asphaltum or paraffine 
base, is one of the most widely 
scattered minerals in the world. 

The development of the great 
fields in Texas and California has 
stimulated experiments to deter- 
mine the practicability of burning 
oil in ocean steamers and espe- 
cially in the navy. With an abun- 
dant supply of oil now assured, 
the next questions relate to its 
economy and the apparatus for its 
use. Oil is in regular use now in 
hundreds of steamers along the 
Gulf, Pacific and Atlantic coasts. 
The most prominent example of 
its successful use in an ocean voy- 
age by an American vessel was 
that of the steamship "Mariposa," 
which recently made the trip from 
San Francisco to Tahiti, 8,ooo 
miles exclusively on oil. Lieut- 
enant Wlnchell, U. S. N., was a 
passenger, detailed by the navy 
department to observe the experi- 
ment. He reports only minor ob- 
jections. Many advantages are 
claimed for oil over coal — the ab- 
sence of ash, the employment of 
fewer firemen, the comparative 
absence of smoke, the generation 
of greater heat in a given space, 
the greater rapidity of steam gen- 
eration and the compactness of 
stowing. 

Russia has already adopted oil- 
firing for her Caspian fleet and 
Sweden has contracted for a 
thirty-one-knot torpedo boat de- 
stroyer, to be fired by liquid fuel. 
Experiments are under way in 
Great Britain, Germany, France, 
Holland and Italy, and naval ves- 
sels of each of those countries 
are to be fitted experimentally 
with oil-burning boilers. Great 
Britain's experiments have been 
confined to the use of oil on the 



torpedo boat destroyer Surly, 
though the cruiser Blonde and 
one of the six boilers of the battle- 
ship Arrogant are fitted for oil. 
The battleships Mars, Hannibal 
and Resolution are to be equipped 
fcr oil experiments. The chief 
objection found in British ventures 
has been the dense smoke result- 
ing. They have been using 
Borneo oil, but are now trying the 
Texas product. 

The Dutch government has con- 
ducted some interesting experi- 
ments, especially with the torpedo 
boats Ophir and Pangrango. An 
increase of two knots was obtained 
on the Pangrango at the same rate 
of combustion as was used for 
coal. The Dutch East India com- 
pany fitted the steamship Brouwer 
with oil-burners on the Korting 
system, and obtained gratifying 
results. " During a five-hours' 
trial in the open sea," reports the 
writer in "Notes on Naval Pro- 
gress," just issued by the navy de- 
partment, "absolutely no work 
had to be done in the fireroom. 
The smoke was very thin, some- 
times hardly visible." 

The French government has 
confined its experiments to the 
use of solidified petroleum and 
briquettes, without striking suc- 
cess. Germany has fitted some of 
her naval vessels for carrying oil 
as an auxiliary to coal, and is con- 
ducting experiments in the exclu- 
sive use of oil. The German 
steamship "Tanglin," on a voyage 
from Singapore to Sydney, a dis- 
tance of nearly 5,500 miles, burned 
Borneo oil, and with marked suc- 
cess. "The weight of each day's 
supply of fuel was much less, and a 
great saving of labor was effected," 
says the report. "Onlyonemanper 
watch was required, instead of five. 
With a consumption of thirteen 
knots per day an average speed of 
nj^ knots per hour was attained. 
This means an Increase amounting 
to a knot per hour. * * * The 
saving of ^5 10s per day does not 
represent the whole gain to the 
shipowner. There is the extra 
freight that he may earn as repre- 
sented by the difference between 
13 and 20 tons dead weight daily 
consumption, which, on a 20 days' 
run, would be equal to 140 tons." 

The naval writer quotes a paper 
by Sir Fortescue Flannery, an au- 
thority on the subject, who says 
that two tons of oil is equivalent 
to three tons of coal, or 36 cubic 



feet of coal, as usually stored in 
ships' bunkers, which would in- 
crease the range of action of a 
warship by 50 percent for the 
bunker space allotted, or nearly 
90 percent upon the bunker space. 

The British admiralty con- 
sidered the fuel value of oil was 
not 50 per cent greater than coal, 
but only a possible 33 per cent. 
In reply to this the author stated 
that the result of six years' ex- 
periments with merchant vessels 
had shown sixteen tons of oil to 
give the same horse-power as 
twenty-five tons of coal. On 
larger vessels twenty-nine to 
thirty tons of oil replaced forty- 
three tons of coal. Experience 
with other vessels was still more 
favorable, and in one case the 
ratio of coal to oil was 3 to 2. 
Recent exhaustive comparative 
tests of Texas oil and coal made 
in a land boiler by Professor 
Denton of Stevens institute of 
Technology, Hoboken, N. J., have 
given the following: 

Evaporation per pound of coal 
from and at 212 , 9.17 pounds. 

Evaporation per pound of oil 
from and at 212 15. 1 pounds. 

Thus 1,362 pounds of oil seems 
equivalent to 2,240 pounds of coal, 
which gives a ratio of efficiency 
of oil to coal of 1.65. These tests 
were conducted with great care 
and under the best possible con- 
ditions. — New York Evening Post. 



OIL ON ROADS. 



Government Agent Recommends 
This Method. 

James W. Abbott, head of the 
Rocky Mountain and Pacific coast 
division of the " Good Roads" 
office of the government, is in Los 
Angeles on a special mission. He 
is visiting Southern California at 
the direction of Secretary of Agri- 
culture Wilson, In order to ob- 
serve the use of oil on the roads. 

" I consider," he said, " that the 
methods of oiling roads as in- 
augurated in this district, ranks 
in importance in the history of 
highways with the discovery of 
the 'macadam' system of roads. 
It is a great thing in modern road 
building." 

Oil-Burning Engines. 

As fast as it is found to be prac- 
ticable the locomotives are being 
converted into oil burners at the 
West Oakland yards. The latest 
additions to the ranks are engines 
No. 1,405, which left the shops last 
week and engine 1,422. which 
went out Monday. The former 
will be in charge of Engineer Con 
Collins and will run between 
Stockton and Sacramento. The 
latter will be stationed on the 
Wadsworth division. The "Eight 
Spot," which carries the Owl train, 
was converted into an oil burner 
last week and is back on her regu- 
lar run. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in tbe world 

We carry in stock heavy 7^-in , 5^-in. and 
4)4-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6 in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ALL FUEL OILS SAFE. 



Proper Core Should Be Exer- 
cised la Their Use. 
It is pointed out by Robert For- 
syth, chief enginer of the Union 
Iron works, and an eminent au- 
thority on fuel oil. that the quality 
of the oil in the "Progreso's" tank 
had very little to do with the ex- 
plosion. While admitting that the 
light oil furnished to the "Pro- 
greso" would, when exposed to 
the air, generate gas more readily 
than heavier oil, according to a 
San Francisco paper, he main- 
tains that the heavier cil would 
have generated gas sufficient to 
cause the exp osion if brought in 
contact with some flame or other 
heat that exploded the gas given 
off by the light oil. 

"Ships do not burn heavy oil 
because it is safer than light oil," 
said Mr. Forsyth, "but because it 
is cheaper. For many years all 
the fuel oil used in this city was 
the light Coalinga oil, and there 
were no accidents. Within the 
past few years the heavy oil has 
been placed on the market in 
great quantities, and it is now 
generally used because the price 
is lower than that of the light oil. 
The supply of light oil is now 
very limited, and nearly the entire 
output is used by the gas com- 
panies in the manufacture oi 
illuminating gas. It is the only 
kind of oil that will serve their 
purpose. This and the limited 
supply are what keep up the price 
of light oil and prevent its gen- 
eral use. 

"All the fuel oils are safe if 
they are not misused. Many ves- 
sels have carried and burned oil 
for years, and the accidents have 
been very, very few. There is 
not the least doubt in my mind 
that the explosion on the " Pro- 
greso" was caused by some one's 
carelessness. It is probable that 
the person responsible for the 
disaster will never be found, but I 
am satisfied that the United States 
inspectors will make a searching 
inquiry. The identity of the cul- 
pable person may remain a secret, 
but the cause of the explosion is 
just as plain to me now as it will 
ever be. The public has been 
given a false impression by the 
talk concerning the test by which 
the Progreso oil flashed when 
heated to ioi° Fahrenheit. That 
was a test made in the open air, a 



condition that never obtains in 
the proper use of oil as fuel. 
Much has also been said almut 
the ventilating pipes attached to 
the " Progreso's" fuel-oil tank. 
The primary function of these air 
pipes is not to afford a means of 
escape for the gas generated in 
the tank, but to equalize the pres- 
sure on the inside and outside of 
the tank as the oil is drawn off. 
Were it not for these pipes the 
drawing off of the oil would create 
a vacuum in the tank, and all the 
air pressure would be against the 
outside of the tank." 



OIL BRICKS. 



Investigating the Value of Com- 
pressed OH as Fuel. 

Should the investigations that 
are now being made by Los An- 
geles experts interested in the local 
oil fields prove the value of co u- 
pressed brick made from crude oil 
an adjunct will be added to the in- 
dustry that may prove far-reaching 
in its effects. This feature em- 
bodies a close test of the plan to 
produce solid oil bricks, devised by 
E. Osborn of Los Angeles. The 
points in favor of this production 
over the use of liquid oil are many, 
says the Los Angeles Herald, but 
the most essential are that the 
bricks can be used in ordinary 
heating stoves, in furnaces and 
grates, as they are handled like 
ordinary coal, andare credited with 
producing more cubits of heat than 
the liquid oil that must be forced 
into the firebox. 

Owing to the absence of coal in 
this part of California and its ex- 
cessive cost, local oil men say that 
thousands of gallons will be con- 
sumed to produce sufficient stock 
to supply the demand for lue). 
While gas is largely used for heat- 
ing and domestic purposes, the in- 
ventor believes that a few bricks 
will suffice for heating a house, 
and that as the heat is almost in- 
stantaneous the practicability of 
brick will be demonstrated in cook- 
ing. 

Oil men are of the opinion that 
the many experiments and tests 
along the line of producing oil 
bricks will eventually produce an 
article that will prove satisfactory 
and that the consumption of these 
will be an additional stimulus to 
the oil industry of the coast. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 



Value of a Well. 
The value of an oil well il sup 
posed to be about three tint! 
net earning power in one year. 
The earning power of a i\ . 
about two barrels les-; than its out- 
put, the value of the oil to be 
measured on the ground. Thus 
the earning power of a 40-barrel 
well, producing 360 days in a year, 
and with the product selling at $1 
per barrel would be (13,680, mak- 
ing the well worth $41,040. On 
the general basis of one well to 
the acre, the producing value of 
160 acres of similar territory would 
rise to the enormous sum of $6,566, 
400. But, enormous though it be, 
it is not a fanciful exaggeration. 
In May, i8qo, section 30, 28-28, in 
the Kern River field, was located 
under the placer miuing law, at a 
cost not exceeding 10 cents an acre, 
or $64 for 640 acres. The sum of 
$4,500,000 is a more recent valua- 



tion of the same property. The 
the locations con- 
d by the Reed Crude Oil 
company, in the same field, did 
not exceed $too. The present 
value of these lands, including the 
improvements, is said to be fully 
$2,500,000. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Miuing, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

STocKsand BoNDSunderwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GOLD! 

Never Goes Begging 

It is always at par. You don't have to seek a market or 
discount your goods. You are not subject to the dictation 
or control of the trusts. Fort hese and many other reasons t 
a good gold property is one of the best investments, and 
stock in a company having a gold property of proven 
merit, managed by men of honesty and mining ability, 
offers to the poor man one of the best avenues to 
independence. Such a proposition is the 

Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owning the Hudson group of mines in the Big Bug Dis- 
trict, Arizona, surrounded by rich 
producing mines. To continue 
development a block of treasury 
stock is now being sold at 



10 



CENTS 

PER SHARE 

Par Value $1.00 
Full Paid. 
Non-Assessable. 



Send for particulars. 



W. G. YOUNG & CO., 



Fiscal 
Agents 



628-630 Laughlin Bldg. 
BANK BEFERENCES Los Angeles, Cal. 



LARGEST 



ALL 
UP 

OIL WELL TO 

SUPPLIES DATE 

R. H. HERRON CO. 




FISHING TOOLS 
FOR RENT 

509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners' Association 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS 
















STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



Money should he sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressedto Pacific Oil Re- 
- porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily lor 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing, off oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order 9or two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal., 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY.. DECEMBER 12, 1902 



that would agree to prospect for 
petroleum. 

Aside from the railroads there 
is an immense market for fuel oil 
there, and it would be an excel- 
lent outlet for the California and 
Texas crudes should the govern- 
ment throw open its doors. From 
rumors that have been given out 
from the capital it is not likely 
that the government will remove 
the duty, although it has been 
argued that it would be advisable 
to do so, until the prospect fields 
had become producers. The rail- 
road interests are powerful and 
they are now exerting their full 
strength to bring about the de- 
sired change. 



American Petroleum. 

The possibilities of American petro- 
leum are discussed at length by a writer 
in Cassier's magazine, and in the course 
of his article considerable attention is 
given to the California production be- 
cause of the marked influence it is hav- 
ing on manufacturing. The. demonstra- 
tion of the value of crude oil as a fuel 
for manufacturing purposes on the Pa- 
cific coast, which is now accepted as a 



of genuine enterprise in it also. Dur- 
ing the year 1901, 14,250 new petroleum 
wells were completed, at an aggregate 
cost of $21, 375,000. Of these 3,220 
proved barren and presented a total loss 
of |5,ooo,ooo. Last year's production 
was the largest on record, although the 
value of oil produced was less than that 
of the year before. This was due to the 
sharp decline in prices in the Texas and 
California oil fields. The 1901 produc- 
tion amounted to 69,389,194 barrels, 
which sold for $66,417,335, while that of 
1900 amounted to 63,620,529 barrels and 
brought $75,989,313. The total exports 
of petroleum in 1901 reached the enor- 
mous bulk of 1,062, 750, 306 gallons, valued 
at $71, 479,124. This wasless than was ob- 
tained for a smaller volume exported in 
1900, which brought $73,276,282. In 
some lines of manufacturing the writer 
in Cassier's believes that oil will be used 
permanently hereafter as fuel in prefer- 
ence to coal, and that the change will 
ultimately " produce effects of consider- 
able importance and of far-reaching 
consequence in the American industrial 
world." That is already true in this 
State. 

Naval Test of Oil-Burners. 

The liquid Fuel Board of the Navy De- 
partment will test this week the various 
kinds of fuel oil burners used in this 
State for the purpose of determining 



The railroads of Mexico are anx- 
ious to become 
OH for Mexico consumers of oil, ] 
and if success- 
ful in their efforts, a new and im- 
portant field will be opened up for 
the consumption of the product of 
California and Texas fields, both of 
which are near the prospective 
market. 

The only oil field in Mexico is 
at Tampico, where the Mexican 
Petroleum company of Los An- 
geles has a few wells. These, 
however, are few in number and 
so small in production that they 
would cut little if any figure when 
it comes to supplying the railroads' 
demands. The company has a 
contract to furnish a large amount 
of oil to the Mexican Central as 
soon as the oil can be developed. 
Whether this can be done is 
largely a matter of conjecture. 

Fuel in Mexico is anything but 
easy to obtain. The railroads 
would save thousands of dollars 
if crude oil was substituted for 
coal and wood. 

The only thing to prevent the 
adoption of the modern and cheap 
fuel is the high tariff which Mex 
ico levies upon oil imports. The 
duty is so excessive that it is at 
present entirely impracticable to 
import it for consumption on the 
railroads. To overcome this, the 
transportation companies are be- 
seeching the government to re- 
move the duty on oil, at least on 
the crude product. So far their 
efforts have been without success, 
as the Mexican government seems 
to be disposed to wait and see 
whether oil can not be found in 
sufficient quantities at home. To 
this end the government is doing 
all it can to encourage the de- 
velopment of prospecting oil 
lands. In many cases it has made 
large concessions to syndicates 



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A Sample Letter. 

Wiuows, Cal., Dec. 2, 1902. 
The Pacific Oil Reporter, 

Gentlemen: I guess I am some in arrears with my 
subscription. I presume I am, for you have stopped 
the paper. I, therefore, enclose a draft for $2.50 on 
account, and I want you to send me the paper right 
along till I order it stopped. I can't get along without 
it as long as I am interested in oil stocks. 

Through the timely information given in the Oil, 
Reporter, you once saved me at least the price of a 
hundred years' subscription. 

Yours very truly, 



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proved quantity, is carrying its influence 
on to the Eastern seaboard and elsewhere 
in the country. Manufactures in those 
sections are imitating our example, and 
even where coal is plentiful are begin- 
ning to equip their furnaces with oil- 
burning appliances as auxiliaries which 
may prove invaluable to them in an 
emergency. The recent anthracite coal 
strike stimulated them to follow this 
course, so that, in the event of another 
coal famine occurring in future, either 
through a similar or some other cause 
they will be prepared to meet it without 
suffering. 

In the East the Texas oil fields are, 
of course, the source of supply on which 
the manufacturers in that section chiefly 
rely at present for fuel oil, for the reason 
that their production is, much like our 
own, better adapted for fuel purposes 
than for any other. But the writer in 
Cassier's thinks that they will ultimately 
be forced to look to the Appalachian re- 
gion and the Lima (Indiana) fields for a 
permanent supply of the new fuel, as he 
doubts the permanency of the Texas 
field. 

The magnitude of petroleum mining 
is something enormous. According to 
the United States Geological Survey, 
1,587 oil stock companies were organ- 
ized last year, with a capitalization of 
$669,083,000. That indicates the degree 
of speculation which has entered into 
the industry. But there is a vast amount 



tained here is something very desirable 
to know. The Navy tests will probably 
settle this fact satisfactorily. If they do, 
it will be a great benefit to commerce, 
and it will go far toward framing proper 
regulations governing the use and stor- 
age of fuel oil on all steamships. If 
such regulations had been in force be- 
fore the changes in the furnaces of the 
"Progreso" were begun, the disaster 
which overtook that unfortunate steam- 
ship would doubtless never have oc- 
curred. — Chronicle. 



their respective merits. California 
crude petroleum will be used in the 
tests, this being the kind of liquid fuel 
for which it is presumed these devices 
have been specially adapted. The San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce and 
the California Petroleum Miners' Asso- 
ciation have used their influence suc- 
cessfully to bring the test about. 

The Navy Department has hitherto 
been moving slowly in the matter of fuel 
oil. It is evidently waking up at last to 
a realization of its importance. Evi- 
dently the favorable report which Lieu- 
tenant Winchell recently made of his 
study of fuel oil consumption in the fur- 
naces' of the steamship "Mariposa" has 
had something to do with the present 
activity of the department. The latter 
ought to have taken the initiative at the 
start, when the possibilities of California 
petroleum as a fuel were beginning to 
come in evidence, so that the mercantile 
marine might have reaped some benefit 
from the results. Up to date the latter 
service has been giving pointers to the 
Navy, which is a reversal of the proper 
order of such matters. However, the 
proposed tests ought to produce results 
from which both branches of sea service 
may profit. The Navy can afford to 
make experiments which the merchant 
marine cannot undertake. 

California has produced many liquid 
fuel burners. Which is the best 
adapted for the crude petroleum ob 



ADULTERATING OIL. 



No Punishment Too Severe lop 
These Offenders. 

It is charged that some of the 
oil refineries have indulged in the 
discreditable practice of adulterat- 
ing Kern-river crude oil while on 
its way from the wells to the place 
of its final' destination with refuse 
distillates of a highly volatile na- 
ture. One of them was, in fact, 
caught, so we are informed by a 
correspondent, by the Selby Smelt- 
ing company supplying its works 
with crude oil which had been 
so dosed. This correspondent sug- 
gests that possibly an admixture 
of volatile refuse distillates with 
Kern-river fuel oils was respon- 
sible for the awful disaster which 
overtook the "Progreso." This 
system of adulteration makes fuel 
oil very dangerous to handle, es- 
pecially when the tanks contain- 
ing it are located In the hold of a 
ship, where a sufficient amount of 
heat Is liable to exist to volatilize 
the distillates and thus create an 
explosive compound, says the 
Chronicle. The charge of fuel 
oil adulteration is made with such 
directness and positiventss that it 
warrants a thorough investigation, 
and, if found true, no measures 
can be adopted by the proper 
authorities too vigorous to stop 
the vicious practice, which aims 
directly at the impairment of a 
great industry and places the lives 
of the public in unnecessary peril. 



The New Plant. 

The new $100,000 plant of 
the Oil Well Supply company 
will be operated in Oil City, Pa., 
and not in Pittsburgh as dis- 
patches from that city indicate. 
The old plants at Oil City will be 
abandoned and the new site is in 
a much more advantageous lo- 
cation. Much of the property ad- 
joining the new site, available for 
building purposes is rapidly in- 
creasing in value. The principal 
interests in the Oil Well Supply 
company are well known men In 
the oil region and in Pittsburgh. 



Paper Mills to Burn Oil. 

Two paper mills at Oregon City 
have completed arrangements for 
the use of crude oil as fuel.- Con- 
tracts have been made with a 
California oil company and the 
use of the new fuel will commence 
by May ist, next. Both com- 
panies now consume 157 cords of 
wood per day, and will use about 
17,000 gallons of oil daily. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries In the Far West. 



ALASKA. 
The Alaska Development company, 
con. posed of Indiana and Puget Sound 
men, have bonded 70,000 acres of Alaska 
oil lands to an English syndicate for 
|2, 500,002, based on an agreement that 
the syndicate shall spend 150,000 a year 
in developments. The chief value of 
these lands lies in the recent striking of 
a gusher 60 miles south of Valdes and to 
miles east of the Copper river. 

KERN 

The Chans!or-Canfield-Midway com- 
pany is drilling on sections 6 and 21 in 
the Midway. 

J. \V. Stroud is the president of the 
new organization formed by the Burks 
Oil company, operating at Midway. 

The Lncky Boy, operating in Midway, 
will drill deeper to increase their output. 
It is now producing about 50 barrels a 
day. 

There has been a perceptible increase 
in the shipments of oil from McKittrick 
within two weeks. Last Tuesday 22 cars 
were shipped. 

The old Kern Crown company has 
been sold to residents of Salt Lake, and 
is now known as the Utah-Midway. It 
is sinking a hole on section 23-32, 23. 

The San Francisco-McKittrick Oil 
couipjny has completed their pipe-line 
to Olig, and will soon begin shipping 
their oil. Five and five-eights casing 
was used to build the line. 

The Southern Pacific company has 



contracted for the erection of three more 
oil tanks at Olig terminal, equal in capa- 
city to the one built last July. Each one 
will hold 55,000 barrels. Work has al- 
ready commenced on these tanks. 

ucl Spellacy, who has a contract to 
drill a well for John M.Wright on the 
land recently purchased northwest of the 
Bay City company's holdings, will begin 
work in a few days. The ground is now 
being prepared for the erection of a rig. 

The Union company has finished au 
immense storage reservoir in the Kern 
River district. It is 250 feet square and 
27 feet in depth, concrete lined, and of a 
capacity of 200,000 barrels. The Stand- 
ard is building three reservoirs of equal 
size. 

The Uncle Sam company, which pio- 
neered magnificently but disastrously in 
the Kern River field when the district 
was in its infancy, is in financial difficul- 
ties at present, according to the Bakers- 
field Californian. At the time it moved 
to Kern county the Uncle Sam had a 
number of producing wells in the Los 
Angeles field and its stock was worth 75 
cents per share. It still has the same 
wells, but the interest upon the indebted- 
ness incurred by reason of the branching 
out, eats up all the profits derived from 
them, and the stock is a drug on the 
market at half a cent. The company 
owes more than $30,000, and the net in- 
come derived from the sale of its oil is 
only slightly in excess of $22 a month. 

The old Laymance water pipe-line, 
which has been the source of supply for 



the McKittrick district, passed with the 
Giant and other properties into the 
hands of the Associated. Rates have 
recently been raised to a price that is 
deemed practically prohibitive, and ef- 

are being made to obtain water 
from other sources. The Chanslor-Cnu- 
field-Midwny company, which serves the 
Midway, has under consideration the 
matter of laying a branch to the older 
field, and undoubtedly will if sufficient 
encouragement is received. The project 
of a company that bored water wells at 
l.o Kern with the object of pumping iu- 

Kittrick may also be revived. Com 
petition has been Invited and it will 
probably be secured. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The activity at the Western Union 
field continues unabated. On Tuesday 
last Supt. Crandall was trying to get an 
extra crew of carpenters, but there was 
not a man to be had. Just now the super- 
intendent is busy placing a new boiler in 
position which will supply power for 
nearly all the pumping plants that are 
now in operation. 

Engineers are engaged now in survey- 
ing a route for a pipe-line from the Pinal 
oil well, the scene of the latest strike, to 
the Pacific Coast Rail load, three miles 
distant. Neither is it beyond the range 
of possibilities that the line may be ex- 
tended to the Betteravia sugar factory 
ten miles distant. The sugar company 
has already contracted with the Pinal 
people for 500 barrels of oil at |l a barrel 
— a price in advance of market quota- 
tions. The Pinal oil will be nsed in the 
sugar company's gas engines for the ir- 
rigation pumps. The oil will be supplied 
as soon as pumping begins, which will 
be in two or three days. The pumps are 
already on the ground and are now being 
put in place. The ground is now being 
cleared for well No. 2, which will be 
started at once. The timbers are already 
being gotten ready so that there shall be 



•» little delay as possible. The first bi, 
storage tank was hauled out lait week 
and placed in position. 

MONTKRBY. 
The motive power at the Salinas 
Creamery is now generated by crude oil 
at a cost of not more than half the price 
of wood before the oil was introduced. 
The oil at the creamery nets that con- 
cern 81 cents per barrel. 

SAN BBNITO. 
The I.add Oil company, near Bin met, 
nre having much trouble. The casing 
shoe broke, and shoe and casing had to 
he pulled from the well. The water is 
now pouring over the top. The o}j-incb 
casing is in had shape and will also prob- 
ably have to be cleaned out. The same 
company is also drilling another well on 
the Croxon ranch. 

MENDOCINO. 
The well at Point Arena is now 880 feet 
deep, with 7-inch drive pipe. The drill 
is in shale. There is lots of gas. 

MARIN. 
The Bolinas Bay company is down 
1,600 feet on well No. 2, with 5,^-inch 
casing. 

SANTA CLARA. 
Work has been resumed on the wells 
at Moody Gulch, and oil shipments have 
been resumed. 

The Lacy company of Los Angeles 
has just completed a contract for the 
erection of an immense oil tank at Gil- 
roy. It is 47 feet in diameter and 20 
feet high, and has a capacity of 225,000 
gallons. 

The Orchard Oil company, which is 
boring a well near Los Gatos, struck the 
third pocket of gas a week ago Wednes- 
day morning at 5 o'clock, and the pres- 
sure was so great that it threw the big 
drill from the well the great force shak- 
ing up the derrick generally. The well is 
1,300 feet deep. The gas reached was so 
strong that all work ceased until day- 
light 



INVESTIGATION mB INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Kern County, Cal., situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present operations is in famous Section 2, Township II, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Well No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 cents A SHARE 



WILL LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that yon act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value $1.00) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock, and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member alifornia Petroleum Miners' Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and Postoffice Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

ELK BORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 



470-471-472 Parrott Building 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE PEERLESS. 



Preparing to Greatly Increase 
Its Output of Oil. 

About a year ago the Peerless 
Oil company found itself unable 
to obtain a satisfactory settlement 
with the United Oil Producers for 
oil furnished that company. The 
amount of the indebtedness was 
nearly or quite $20,000. 

The only means to obtain satis- 
faction was to take over the busi- 
ness of the United Oil Producers, 
fill their contracts then existing, 
make new ones, and thus save the 
Peerless Oil company from con- 
siderable financial loss. 

This was done forthwith, and 
for a year or more the Peerless 
has been conducting most suc- 
cessfully the business formerly 
transacted by the United Oil Pro- 
ducers, and has successfully man- 
aged the branches which had been 
established at Stockton, San Jose, 
Oaklmd, San Francisco and else- 
where. 

The retail business thus entailed 
was not according to the original 
plans of the management of the 
Peerless company, and when it 
had conducted this business until 
it had fully reimbursed itself for 
former losses, it accepted an offer 
from the Standard Oil company, 
and turned over to that company 
all the plants it had established in 
various places, and all the new as 



well as old contracts it had on 
hand to fill. 

In return the Standard has 
agreed to take from the Peerless 
company oil to the amount of 
5,000 barrels a day for a period of 
five years, at least, at a most satis- 
factory price. 

The Peerless has now an output 
of over 3,000 barrels a day, and 



cents a share by April, if not 
sooner. 

The company has no trouble or 
expense as to marketing its prod- 
uct, its entire lookout being simply 
to be able to produce and deliver 
to the Standard's tanks at Kern 
River 5,000 barrels daily of mar- 
ketable oil. 

This amount of oil is half the 



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Do you want to sell oil well machinery and sup- 
plies? 

Have you oil land to sell? 

Do you want to buy oil land? 

Do you want to sell the stocks of a first class oil 
company? 

If you do then send in your advertisement for the 
New Year's edition of the Pacific Oii, Reporter. 

An edition of 25,000 copies will be printed, ele- 
gantly Illustrated. 

Advertisements must be sent by December 29th. 



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new wells are being drilled as 
rapidly as possible, so that soon 
after the first of the year the 
Peerless will be delivering 5,000 
barrels a day, and will be able to 
continue this delivery through the 
period contracted for. 

The company is now paying a 
dividend of 10 cents a share, 



which will be increased to 25 
amount the Standard will be 
able to send through its pipe line 

to Point Richmond until it installs 
another set of pumps in its pump- 
ing stations. 

Five thousand barrels a day 
means 150,000 barrels a month, 
1,800,000 a year, and 9,000,000 
barrels for five years. 



It is not known what sum the 
Peerless will receive for the en- 
tire amount of the production as 
it is understood that the price 
varies, increasing from year to 
year. Even at the low price of 
25 cents a barrel the company 
would receive monthly $37,500; 
yearly $450,000, and In the entire 
five years $2,250,000 — quite a 
snug sum to receive from 160 acres 
of land that four years ago went 
begging at $2.50 an acre. 



Discarding Coal for OH. 

Work began this week in trans- 
forming the steam schooner "Alca- 
traz" into an oil burner, and, fol- 
lowing her, the "Alcazar" will be 
changed from a user of coal to an 
oil-burner. Both steamers are 
owned by the L. E. White com- 
pany, prominent in the lumber- 
carrying trade. 



SOME MEN PAY 

$10,00O foraDex P erttomaa - 

age their advertis- 
ing. There are others who pay 
$5.00 for an annual subscrip- 
' lion to PRINTERS' 

INK and learn what all the adver- 
tisers are thinking about. Buteven 
these are not the extr mes reached. 
There are men $100,000 
who lose over .. 

a year by doing neither one. 
For sample send 10 cents to PRINTERS' 
INK, No. 10 Spruce St., New York City. 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that bays the oil and pays J1.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes THE highest grade gaso- 
line, BENZINE AND KEROSENE OE ANY REFINERY ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 



$89 buys 100 Shares in each of four companies, or 
400 shares full-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment, 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
337 percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 450 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
goo, 000 shares held in trust by us. 



The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

'•There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52°Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade for illuminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity tkat has ever come to this State slip into compantively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because they did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
any speculative venture, but in actually proven lands, which can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $5,000 per acre, and which in a few 
years will be worth five times that price." 



Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three; Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates 900,000 shares. 
We act as trustee foi this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will be taken up and the pooled 
stock ot the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus if three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
payer the investment would still yield 12^ percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 



THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HALFMOON BAY OILFIELDS. One c< m- 
pany is pumping 52 gravity oil, selling it at $1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1,150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well ; third company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset, 
and laad holdings, drilling rig, and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 

INDEX. 

Facts Worth Reading , Costly Advertising [ 

Investigations Why Some Coiporatibnd Fail 

Trust Fund Our Plan 

Debentures A Word About Our Business 

Experienced Management A Good Thing to Do 

A Word of Caution Satisfied Stockholders 

Our Invariable Rule The Percent of Failures ,1 

No Man Always Knows A Refinery ' 

I,oans to Customers Maps and Photographs ■. 

Our Profits , Ten Reasons Why 

The Big Four The Price of Oil 

Directors of The Oil Companies Press Notes 

Reports Upon The Property Faithin Oil 

Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 



THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL OIL PROPOSITION : 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade oil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 

"Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTKR 



OILING OUSTY ROADS. 



Experiment Tried In England 
With Perfect 8uccesa. 
A week ago a section of the 
main road at I'arnborough, near 
Aldershot, was treated with oil, 
and on Saturday a party of road 
experts and automobilists paid a 
first visit of inspection. The ex- 
periment, though only in an iuitial 
stage, promises a great success. 
The oil has been applied along 
three-quarters of a mile of the 
main road near Farnborough sta- 
tion. The reason this particular 
road was selected for the experi- 
ment was that it is one of the very 
dustiest among the main roads of 
the county. The soil of the dis- 
trict is sandy, and, in spite of the 
fact that part of the road has been 
reconstructed with what is known 
as Cherbourg quartzite, it has a 
thick, mealy dust which retards 
the progress of all traffic and rises 
in blinding and suffocating clouds 
on the passage of any motor car. 
To this surface W. J. Taylor, 
the county surveyor, applied 
eleven and a half tons of Texas 
oil a week ago. At each end of 
the oiled strip lay a white, dusty 
road; between was a dark-brown 
stretch, clean, firm, but elastic — a 
road of linoleum. Of the oil itself 
there was little or no sign. 

A stranger might have re- 
marked on the excellence of the 
road; he would hardly have 
guessed at its treatment. There 
was no smell nor any apparent 
greasiness — simply an unbroken 
suface, smooth and welded to- 
gether. Of dust there was not a 
trace. 

It was a picture to see a power- 
ful motor car, half hidden in its 
cloud of dust in the distance, 
sweep on to the oiled surface dis- 
tinct and vivid. The fastest run 
raised nothing in the shape of 
dust. On all hands there was 
pleasure at the first results of the 
experiment. The practicability 
of the oiling system can only be 
established by tests extending 
over a considerable time, but 
meanwhile experts are thoroughly 
satisfied with the results. 

It Is pointed out that the treat- 
ment with oil may be found not 
only greatly to improve the roads, 
but also to effect an economy 
in their maintenance. Roughly 
ly speaking, the cost of oiling the 
three quarters of a mile was ,£30. 
The yearly cost of repairing and 
keeping up each mile of the road 
in an ordinary way is .£300. It is 
probably that the oiling will con- 
siderably reduce that expense. 
Certainly the heavy expense of 
watering would be done away 
with, and it Is practically certain 
that the road will not wear out so 
quickly being consolidated and 
toughened by the oiling process. 

Mr. Taylor, the surveyor, is care- 
fully testing all these matters, 
even going so far as to weigh each 
hovelful of sweepings from the 



oiled section and from a corres- 
ponding length of the unoiled 
road. 

"Of couise," said he, "we want 
to find out how the oiled road will 
stand very cold and very hot 
weather, and we have not had 
any rain on it yet. Before I say 
anything definite for publication 
I shall report to the county au- 
thorities. 

"Much will depend on how 
often the road will require treat- 
ment with oil, and we have also 
to find out the exact amount nec- 
essary at each application aud the 
best means of applying it. I am 
proposing to make experiments in 
other parts of the county. I had 
the idea of oiling roads in my 
mind when the proprietors of the 
County Gentleman offered to 
make the experiment if the au- 
thorities would provide the road; 
so we joined forces." 

Rees Jeffreys, the honorary sec- 
retary of the Roads Improvement 
association, who has been largely 
instrumental in carrying the ex- 
periment through, is very pleased 
with what has been done. He 
says that the opinion of motor car 
experts is that their tires are not 
likely to suffer from the oil. The 
further objection that there might 
be oil splashes is banished by an 
inspection of the road. 

Mr. Jeffreys adds that nearly 
everyone who knows anything 
about road traveling and has seen 
the oiled road is emphatic in its 
praise. — London Mail. 

SPOILING THE WATER. 



Waste Oil Worrying Kern Irri- 
gating Companies. 

The different irrigating com- 
panies of Kern county have sent 
out the following circular to oil 
companies: 

The irrigating companies which re- 
ceive their water supply from Kern 
River are beginning, with the approach 
of the wet season, to become appre- 
hensive of the large amount of waste oil 
that has accumulated in sumps or by 
seepage along the water shed of the 
river. 

The companieshave heretofore warned 
the oil producers on this point and the 
existing circumstances have warranted 
the issuance of the following letter to 
those engaged in producing oil along 
the Kern river: 

You have heretofore been advised, 
and we again call your attention to the 
fact that oil from your wells has either 
been discharged into or allowed to flow 
into Kern river with the result that the 
water in the river has been polluted to 
such an extent as to materially interfere 
with its use for irrigating. 

From the examination which has 
been made by our representatives, it is 
apparent that, as soon as heavy rains 
come, a large quantity of oil which has 
been allowed to flow from your wells and 
deposit itself upon the water shed sup- 
plying the river will be precipitated into 
the stream, and will so injuriously affect 
the quality of the water as to render 
much of it unfit for the purposes tor 
which it would be used by those en- 
titled to divert it. 

We therefore notify you that unless 
you take such immediate steps as will 
prevent the precipitation of this oil into 
the river, we shall be compelled to ap- 



ply to the courts for relief, including 
the to 1 you of lucli Jltunge 

«s we n«ve suffered in tin 

The warning has been heeded 
and the companies warned have 
taken steps to prevent any mure 
trouble from oil. 



Tank Fire Protection. 

An invention has been made to 
provide means for the immediate 
extinguishing of fire in oil-con- 
taining tanks, and thereby pre- 
vent the liability of heavy pe- 
cuniary loss and the loss of life 
which, as is well known, some- 
times occurs when petroleum con- 
tained in large tanks is set on fire, 
usually by lightning. Where a 
number of tanks are located in 
close proximity the igniting and 
burning of one tank is generally 
followed by the loss of all the 
rest, which the inventor of this 
apparatus thinks would not be 
the case if his apparatus were 
brought into general use. The 
invention, considered broadly, con- 
sists of an oil-containing tank, in 
whioh is a vertically movable 
plate or disk of slightly smaller 
diameter than the interior of the 
tank, with suitable devices for 
normally retaining the disk in the 
bottom of the tank and means to 
automatically elevate the disk 
when the retaining devices are 
released in case of the oil taking 
fire. As the disk rises through 
the oil the latter flows downward 



around the edges, until riuall} 
there is a thin sheet of burning 
oil on top of the ,!isk, which is al- 
lowed to burn itself out. The ele- 
vation of the disk is accomplished 
by a series of weights and cables, 
v* hlch are set in motion by the 
burning of a cord or fusing of a 
soft wire in the heat of the llamts. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock Issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A BONANZA 
INVESTMENT 



The Colombian Oil, Asphalt and Refin= 
ing Company, 

of California, has the largest and most valuable deposit 
of LIQUID ASPHALT yet discovered in this country ; 
has its own REFINERY of over 400 barrels daily ca- 
pacity, which was started up on November 1st, and as 
the asphalt produced contains several by-products of 
great commercial value, the company should be able to 
earn and pay very heavy dividends, in fact, so large as 
to warrant the stock advancing to par in the next few 
weeks, and probably to several hundred per cent pre- 
mium by the first of the new year. The stock is now 
selling at only 4J£ CENTS PER SHARE (£45 per thou- 
sand) which is just 45 cents on the dollar, and the 
FIRST QUARTERLY DIVIDEND HAS BEEN 
PROMISED FOR JANUARY 1ST. Invest now and 
have your stock share in the first dividend. Write or 
call at once for reports, photographs of the refinery and 
the fullest information. 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 



2 KILBY ST., = = BOSTON, MASS. 



PACIF C OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

Wednesday, December io, 1902. 

Business on the board has been fairly 
active during the past week, with a 
slightly better feeling all along the line 
and an advance in several of the leading 
stocks. 

Home has passed the I3 mark — 
probably on the report of a large con- 
tract for the delivery of oil having been 
entered into by the company. Peer- 
less has improved in price, but is still 
below the figure of two weeks ago. Four 
has marked an advance — selling up to 
60 cents. 1,000 Apollo went over the 
board at 28 cents — a considerable ad- 
vance over the last recorded sale. Kern 
is somewhat stronger, several lots chang- 
ing hands at $4. More money is being 
offered for Thirty-Three, and what little 
stock seems to be on the market is 6rmly 
held at |8. Some inquiry for S. F. & 
McKittrick has brought out higher bids, 
and $1.60 is now offered. There has not 
been mnch doing in Monte Cristo dur- 
ing the week, though the price has 
stiffened a little from the extreme low 
point of the break of last week. 

In water stocks, Contra Costa is high- 
er, with 169.50 bid. Central Light & 
Power, Equitable, and S. F. Gas & Elec- 
tric are all slightly better. Sugar stocks 
continue firm, with advances in Hono- 
lulu, Hutchinson and Makaweli, Ha- 
waiian Commercial sagged slightly from 
the highest point reached. 

In Bonds, S. P. of Arizona, 1909, sold 
at 1113.50. 



New Incorporations. 

The following articles of incorporation 
were filed last week in the office of the 
Secretary of State: 

Live Oak Oil company. Principal 
place of business, San Francisco. Di- 
rectors: J. Hoeges, J. W. Stevens, H. 
Mills, O. E. Falsh and M. L. Culver. 
Capital stock, $5,000; subscribed, $300. 

Brookshire Oil company. Principal 
place of business, San Francisco. Di- 
rectors: P. Moore, P. O. Tietson, T. J. 
Brookshire, D. D. Barnard and H. Bahr. 
Capital stock, $500,000; subscribed, 
$25,500. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



OH 



29 00 

236 00 

1,110 00 



California Stock and 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 10: , 

APOLLO. 

1,000 at $ 28 $ 280 00 

FOUR. 

58 

59 

60 

HANFORD. 
3 at 90 00 270 00 

HOME OIL. 

90 (S 90) 290 00 

3 05 (S 90) 305 00 

Q5 590 0° 

3 05 152 SO 

INDEPENDENCE. 

05 4 40 

06 48 00 

07 28 00 

06 (B 90) . . 60 00 

08 (B 90J 80 00 

KERN. 

4 00 240 00 

4 00 (S 5) 200 00 

4 25 21 25 

KERN RIVER OIL. 

8 00 80 oo 

8 75 437 50 

LION. 

06 

05 

MONARCH. 

16 

19 



50 at 

400 at 

1,850 at 



100 at 

100 at 

200 at 

50 at 

88 at 

800 at 

400 at 

1,000 at 

1,000 at 

60 at 

50 at 

5 ^ 

10 at 
50 at 

2,850 at 
250 at 

25 at 
500 at 



100 at 

1,100 at 

50 at 

100 at 



MONTE CRISTO. 

1 37'A (S 30) 137 5° 

1 37'A I.5I2 So 



40. 
35- 



70 00 
135 00 



100 at 
300 at 

60 at 
50 at 

S. 
100 at 

500 at 
133 at 

100 at 
200 at 



2,500 at 



170 at 

100 at 

80 at 



355 at 



OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

14 14 00 

15 45 00 

PEERLESS. 

11 25 675 00 

11 37^ 568 75 

F, & MCKITTRICK OIL. 

1 75 (S 90) 175 00 

SOVEREIGN. 

27 13500 

25 33 25 

STERLING. 

1 62j£ 162 50 

1 65 (B 30) 330 00 

SUPERIOR. 

03 75 00 

THIRTY-THREE. 

7 50 1,275 00 

7 75 775 00 

8 00 640 00 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 

1 60 568 00 



(6,939 Shares Amount $12,070 65 

HUTCHINSON SUGAR. 

25 at 17 75 443 75 

10 at 18 50 185 00 



35 Shares Amount $628 75 
S. P. OF ARIZ. 1909 6's. 
1,000 at 1 13% 1, 135 00 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L- CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. BWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

518 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building, Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Bdilding, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, S. F. 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 



ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 

ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT& LUBRICATING OILS 



171 00 
12 50 



4 00 
95 00 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write J. D. Johnston. 

Newport, R. I. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



PEERLESS OIL COMPANY— ON DECEM- 
ber 1st declared a dividend No. 9, of ten (io) 
cents per share, payable January i, 1903. Books 
close December 26, 1902. 

The address of stockholder W. I, Taze is desired. 
GURDON BRADLEY, Assistant Secretary.^ 



J 



JOSEPH B, TOPLITZ 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 3S5 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Home," "Kern" and 'Monarch" (of Arizona). 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"Montana Tonopah." 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Cecil" and "Grass Valley Consol." 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Whenever there is any notable development in a company or change in the 
price of stocks, my clients interested in same at once receive such information by 
wire or mail, without further charge. I also engage to keep yon fully posted on 
your purchases made through my agency and thus oftentimes put you in a posi- 
tion to acquire desirable stock at low prices. 

Write to the undersigned for information regarding Oil and 

Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, returning io 

percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 

speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Business College and 
School of Engineering 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughting, 
Strength of Mateilals, and Surveying. 

THE MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis, Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Mining. Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics. 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
Practical, Work Shop and Laboratory Practice. Construction. Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics, etc. 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of abusiness education. Day and Evening Classes. 

I©" Write for new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. F0R6IE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 
Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal,. Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench SS^S 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one ot these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change. the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



PACIFIC OIL RRPORTKR 



A NBW EPOCH. 



it 



Oregon manufacturers Now Use 
Oil for Fuel. 

The bulk of the coal used in 
California and in fact all over the 
Pacific coast comes from the North 
— from Washington and Oregon. 
There coal is cheap, and is in gen- 
eral use except in those localities 
where wood is so plentiful and 
cheap that it has supplanted coal. 

Now it looks as if California oil 
was to supplant both coal and 
wood, in fact it has already sup- 
planted them in a great measure, 
and every freight train that now 
enters the Webfoot State has with 
it one or more cars of crude pe- 
troleum, some of which is to be 
used for fuel oil in the mines and 
manufacturies of the North and 
some to be used for gas-making in 
the cities of both Oregon and 
Washington. 

The Northern trade in oil has 
become so extensive and the busi- 
ness is increasing so rapidly that 
the Union Oil company has been 
compelled to use its barge, Santa 
Paula, for transporting oil from 
Ventura county and from its tanks 
on the San Francisco bay to Port- 
land. 

Her first trip to Portland was 
finished last Sunday, when she 
crossed the bar in tow of a staunch 
tug, and discharged her cargo of 
8,200 barrels of oil into the new 
tanks there. 

In crossing the bar her rudder 
was slightly damaged, but no 
difficulty is expected on her sub- 
sequent trips. 

The Santa Paula will make 
three trips a month to Portland 
until the steamers are completed 
that are now In the hands of the 
builders. These steamers are the 
" Argyle," 30,000 barrels capacity, 
which will be ready for sea by 
the middle of January, and the 
" Lyman Stewart," 10,000 barrels 
capacity, with a speed of 12 knots, 
and will be ready for sea by the 
middle of March. 

•The " Argyle" will be used 
principally for the Hawaiian trade, 
making coast-wise trips whenever 
necessary. She will be so ar- 
ranged as to tankage, and loading 
and unloading facilities that she 
can be filled and emptied in ten 
hours. 

The ship " Fullerton," has now 
made two very quick trips to the 
islands, the first in forty-one days 
(round trip), the second in forty- 
two days. These are exception- 
ally quick trips and prove the 
judgment of the directors of the 
Union Oil company in making the 
experiment of building a tank 
sailing vessel — the first of her 
kind. 

It is probable that another tank 
sailing vessel will soon be ordered. 

The Union Oil company has 
succeeded in building up a big 
trade in crude petroleum In the 
North, and this trade bids fair to 
rapidly increase as the superior- 
ity of oil over other fuels is practi- 
cally demonstrated. 



fuel and will not consnme over 
ten gallons of crude oil daily, 
which is economical heating with 
oil at only $1 a barrel. 



riYGNBT PKTROLKCM CO 

Capital S150.000 

io.000 chares at % y 

Location— Fresno county. 

Directors— Chaa. L Pair, preanlcnl. BUta W 1'sx 
Ion, »tc*-prra!Jent. Chat. A. L«. treasurer. John 
C. Mc Hirer, sccTttarr. 

Office— 561 Parrott Butidtoi. 

Tel —South 184. 



s 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital.. Jyw.ooo 

Treasury stock «, w .ooo 

Location: 09 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrtck: 80 acres owned In Coalinga near 
Home OH company, Fresno; 160 seres owned ad- 
Joining oil well in .Napa ralley. 

Leased 6000 acres asphaltum land In Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Kalkenber*., president; M T Hen- 
ley, secretary: B B Clawson, R P Chase, Col K J 
Ensign. 

Offices: 47S-76 Parrott Building, 853 Market 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 



Oil Burner at High School. 

Ralph Jackson has installed one 
of his patented practical crude oil 
or distillate burners at the Fuller- 
ton high school to heat all the 
rooms in the building. Coal and 
wood used in the furnace would 
not heat the building satisfactorily, 
but the new burner does the work 
to perfection, only one burner be- 
ing used. It is a great saving of 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the Largest Stock. Onr prices are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 




SmithPremier £ 
Typewriters 5 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Assoclat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers. 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L, E. ALEXANDER 



L. & H. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 

110 Mont 1 * nery St. San Francisco. 

Branch Stores: 

Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. 



Opportonities in a Lifetime A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. E. 



Headquarters School, fiiTerueit aid 

Oil Laidj in California. 

School land* may be taken from 160 to &40 acres 

l.»in1» bKmiqJ in all eountie* in State. They le- 
.juire no condition »■ to residence on land or 
cultivation, and carrv all minerals and deposits, 
only $1.™ an acre. Kasy terms. Fortunes hare 
been made In all the California oil districts. Now 
11 opportunity. School land's are adapted to 
Fanning, Ranching. Timber Lands and are the 
>afest and Cheapest Speculation in the United 
States. Send stamp for Land Book and Circulars. 
Fine proven oil lands to offer. Correspondence 
solicited. Established 1685. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



219 Crocker Building 
SAN FRANCISCO 



If You are going East call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar top 
Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 
B. o. Mccormick. t. h. goodman, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United States and 

assssasssssssssssssssssss. Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. f 



San Francisco, Cal 



YOULE 




CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil I«ands and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Pishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Present Address; 

Apbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especiall} 
1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are. simp 
powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and In many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GiIt=Bdged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

ACRES 0000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected, Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b.'here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, = 



Stock Nonassessable. 
= $350,000 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 4S8 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 



American Steel & Wire Co, 

CHICAGO NEW YORK WORCESTER DENVER SAN FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 




American Steel Wire Pumping Line 
American Steel Wire Tubing Line 
American Steel Wire Sand Line 
Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 

PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 

G TV SALES OFFICE 

8 and 10 Pine jStreet 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GEO. H. M0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. IO 



.1 



AGENCIES . 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

B. R. ELDREDGE, Sales Agent o. D. COI.VIN, Sales Agent 



Flexible Metallic Tubing 

The intelligent mechanic will recog- 
nize "A GOOD THING " in FLEXIBLE 
METALLIC TUBING, a Reliable and 
Practically Indestructible Substitute 
for Rubber Hose for All Purposes. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices, It Will Pay Yon 




Fop 



Suction 



© 



and 



Discharge Pipes 



FOR STEAM 
OILS, GAS 
AND HYDRAULIC 
PURPOSES 



CBAS. C. 
MOORE 
SCO., 
ENGINEERS 

Contractors 
for 

Complete 

Power 

Plants 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Main 
Office 

32 First St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Branch 
Offices 

Los Angeles 

Seattle) 

New York 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., DBCEMBER 19, 1903. 



Price 10 Cents. 




Goods 

Manufactured 
By the 






OIL WELL 
SUPPLY CO. 



Of 

Pittsburgh, 
Penna. 






FOR 



Drilling & Operating Oil & Gas Wells 

Are known and used throughout the world, because they are 
The Best That Can Be Made. 



Business Established 1S6I 

Have Ten Fully Equipped Manufacturing Plants 



Special Attention is Invited to the Superiority of their 

Boilers, Engines, Drilling Tools, Etc. 



SOLE AGENTS 

READING IRON CO.'S 
IRON CASINO, 
TUBING, DRIVE and 
LINE PIPE 



Stocks ol these Goods are carried 
by Dealers at 

Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, 
Bakersfield, 
McKittrick, 
Coalinga, Etc. 



THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




BOSTON CASING 



ssssssssssssssssssssssss 



<£> LINE PIPE 



<J> DRIVE PIPE 




b> TUBING 

As Manufactured by the 

NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through 6 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1902. 



Prick, Tbn k knts. 



THE ELMORE PROCESS. 

Oil Proved to Be of Great Use to Metal 
Miners. 



A Process Invented By Which with Petroleum a 

Great Increase is Obtained in Values Secured 

from Low Grade Ores. 



The California Pet oleum in- 
dustry is interested in every new 
or growing Geld of oil consump- 
tion. It is, of course, especially 
interested in these phases of con- 
sumption in which quantity is a 
large factor, but there is incidental 
Interest in every use of crude or 
refined oils in the wide 
range of industrial 
arts, whether the con- 
sumption is relatively 
large or small. 

One of the most in- 
teresting new ways in 
which petroleum oils™™i 
have been found of 
service to industry is 
that of the Elmore process for 
the concentration of certain ores 
by the use of oil. Oil has already 
proved to be a great aid in 
several ways to the sister in- 
dustry of metal mining. It has, 
within a year, cut in half the fuel 
bills of many extensive Western 
mines and it has done the same 
thing for some of the largest West- 
ern smelters. At the Selby smelt- 
ing works crude petroleum sup- 
plies the necessary intense heat 
for no less than forty-seven ore-re- 
ducing furnaces of the reverbera- 
tory and roasting types and the 
metallurgical world feels that it is 
on the verge of success in adapt- 
ing petroleum to the blast furnace 
— a revolutionary thing that would 
be of incalculable value to the 
mining industry of western Amer- 
ica. 

The Elmore process will never 
be a large consumer of petroleum 
oils and it is the metal miner who 
is mainly concerned with its tech- 
nology and commercial success, 
but it has a good deal of interest 
for the petroleum producer who 
cares about everything relating to 
his industry. The technical feat- 
ures of this process were described 
and illustrated in the Pacific Oil 
Reporter of October 3rd last and 
attention is here given to it again 
on account of the interesting ex- 
periments with a small laboratory 



plant in progress at the University 
of California under the direction of 
Professor S. B. Christy, dean of 
the College of Mining of that in- 
stitution, who made an extem- 
poraneous pre- 
liminary report 
on the process at 



the recent an- 
nual convention 
of the California 
Miners' associa- 
tion at San 
Francisco. 

He explained 
that the funda- 
mental princi- 
ple of the process was the 
mysterious and remarkab e affinity 
that a heavy petroleum oil has 
for the metallic contents of many 
ores when they are wet. When 
such an ore is finely ground, 
thoroughly wet and mixed with 
such an oil, the oil will stick 
to the minute particles which 
carry the metal values and bear 
them with it to the surface of the 
water in the vessel. The earthy 
contents of the ore, which con- 
stitute the waste matter which it 
is the purpose of all forms of con- 
centration to get rid of, sinks to 
the bottom, as the oil has no 
affinity for it. Thus the oil float- 
ing on the water carries most of 
th? values and the latter will float 
off with the oil. By this means 
the valuable contents of an ore 
can be quickly and cheaply 
separated from the waste on a 
large scale with the proper mix- 
ing apparatus and a supply of oil 
and water. 

The next step is that of getting 
the concentrated values from the 



oil, and this is the most difficult 
and expensive part of the pro- 
cess. The problem is thus similar 
to that of the cyanide process for 
extracting gold from crushed ore. 
It is easy to put the ore in a cya- 
nide solution, which dissolves the 
gold, but it is not so easy to re- 
cover the gold from the solution. 
The affinity upon which the El- 
more process depends was discov- 
ered thirty years or so ago, but 
no one before Elmore, in 1900, de- 
vised a practicable and economical 
way of separating the oil and the 
values. To remove the oil by dis- 
solving in gasoline is not econo- 
mically feasible. Elmore devised 
a centrifugal machine which does 
the work perfictly, and this is the 
distinctive feature of this process. 
The other features of an Elmore 
plant consist mainly of devices for 
mixing the material with the oil 
and removing the latter, with its 
load of mineral, to the centrifugal 
machine. The accompanying dia- 
gram illustrates 
the principal fea- 
tures of a plant. 
The mixing is 
done continuously 
and automatically 
in a revolving 
drum to which the 
watery pulp flows 
from a crushing 




Diagram Showing Elmore 
Process. 

plant, and to which oil 
is piped from a tank. Helical 
blades in the revolving cylinder 
mix the material and pass it 
through the drum and out to a 
pointed box called a spitzkasten. 
Here the oil floats on the water 
with its load and overflows at the 
top of the box. The earthy waste 
and the water go to the pointed 
bottom and are drawn off. Some 
of the values remain in the tail- 
ings, and so they are passed 
through two other drums. The 
oil and mineral go to the centri- 
fugal machine, which revolves at 
very high speed, and which is so 
arranged that the oil leaves the 
heavier mineral and flows off. For 
greater efficiency the mineral is 
passed through a second centri- 
fugal machine. The process is in 
commercial operation at a low- 
grade copper mine in Wales, and 



the results here and at the ex- 
perimental plant in London, to 
which ores have been sent from 
all over the world, have been one 
of the new wonders of the mining 
world. It will enable the working 
of a great many low-grade mines 
whoseorescould not be madetopay 
by any other process, and It is es- 
pecially adapted to sulphide cop- 
per ores. 

Prof. Christy investigated the 
process when in England some 
time ago, and the company gave 
him a small laboratory plant for 
the university with which he has 
been conducting a series of ex- 
periments with Paciflc coast ores. 
In his recent talk he stated that 
no one understood the affinity be- 
tween oil and certain minerals. It 
was a molecular cohesion, and 
some thought it due to electrical 
inQuences. The oil used in Eng- 
land was of about the consistency 
of cylinder oil, and is a residue 
from the refining of paraffine oil. 
He has so far used in his tests the 
same oil, but will make a series of 
tests with California oils, and he 
said that if they prove adaptable 
to the process it would be an im- 
portant thing for the California 
oil industry. He had found the 
process strikingly successful with 
low-grade copper, silver and mo- 
lybdenum ores, and observed that 
there were some very 
interesting and pecul- 
iar phenomena con- 
nected with the pro- 
cess, and various prob- 
blems that it would 
take a good while to 
work out. He expects 
to work out some of 
these problems at the 
university. 

This new process is likely to 
soon be in operation at certain 
large California and other Amer- 
ican mines, and will attract much 
attention. 



More Oil Tanks. 

The Southern Pacific is increas- 
ing Its tankage on the San Joa- 
quin division. A huge tank of 
55,000 barrels capacity was com- 
pleted a few days ago at Santa 
Barbara. Work will be com- 
menced at once on one of 15,000 
capacity at Mojave. Six new tanks 
of 55,000 barrels each are being 
erected at Oil City in the Kern 
River field, where the company 
already has eight completed. One 
of 5,000 has been erected at Gosh- 
en, one of 15,000 at Fernando, and 
three of 55,000 each at Olig are in 
course of construction. It is ex- 
pected that a large tank will be 
erected later in Bakersfield. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RUSSIAN IRON WORKS. 



Petroleum Residuum Successfully Employed 
In the Iron and Steel Industries. 



The Methods of Using the Liquid Fuel.— How the Oil 

Is Transported and Stored.— Unfavorable Climatic 

Conditions.— The Use of Oil Becoming General. 



The employment of petroleum 
in the iron and steel industries has 
increased considerably in Russia 
during the past few years, and 
this increase the Nobel Gessell- 
schaft mainly occasioned by the 
employment of the residuum in 
the furnaces of their factories in 
St. Petersburg. Shortly thereafter 
the Metallurgist e Gesellschaft in 
Moscow began with the employ- 
ment of the same in the Martin 
furnaces, and since that time a 
considerable number of factories 
have been established in the Vol- 
ga district, which use petroleum 
residuum almost exclusively as a 
fuel. 

The burning of the petroleum 
takes place by means of a dissi- 
pater in a furnace equipped with 
fireproof brick, upon which the 
mass is thrown, finely distributed 
by a stream of steam or com- 
pressed air, so that it is burned in 
the form of a gaseous substance. 
For this purpose Korting's well- 
known bellows serves, which was 
used for a long time for the pur- 
pose of cooling hot condensed 
steam. This apparatus consists of 
a cylinder-shaped conical pipe, in 
which an archimedic screw is 
placed. The oil brought into this 
pipe by pressure must follow the 
windings of the screw, and, speed- 
ed at departure by rotary motion, 
it scatters in firing. 

The firing apparatus consists of 
a steam pump which forces the 
oil into a pipe from which it 
flows into a second pipe. Above 
these two pipes is a heater which 
utilizes the steam emitted from 
the pump. The temperature of 
the fluid amounts to from 8o° to 
90 C. Between the two pipes 
connection is constructed, which 
serves to heat the fuel contained 
in the two pipes for its further 
progress. The burning is regu- 
lated by means of a hand pump, 
through which one secures a great- 
er or smaller pressure at the en- 
trance of the oil, according to the 
speed of the same, and at the same 
time the amount of the oil ad- 
mitted into the fuel can be regu- 
lated. 

The arrangements employed in 
the ovens of the iron works for the 
purpose of heating by means of 
petroleum can be divided into two 
classes: 

i. Contrivances by which the 
petroleum in fluid or gaseous con- 



dition is consumed without dis 
sipating. 

2. Contrivances by which the 
petroleum is dissipated. 

With the first the burning is in 
a burning chamber, situated out- 
side the engine room; in the sec-, 
ond, the burning chamber is gen- 
erally situated within the engine 
room. 

The method of burning the pe- 
troleum in a fluid or gaseous con- 
dition is employed in the heating 
furnaces of Nobel's factories, of 
the Metallurgische Gesellschaft, 
in Moscow, and the company in 
Sormowo. The petroleum is heat- 
ed in the open air under the same 
conditions as in annealing fur- 
naces. For the purpose of kind- 
ling, the troughs are filled with 
oil and covered with sticks of 
wood at proper intervals, and 
these are set on fire, whereupon 
the oil takes fire at once. If the 
oven is insufficiently heated, the 
burning is imperfect; the smoke 
disappears thereupon little by lit- 
tle. The air required in the 
burning is admitted laterally 
through openings put in a door, 
which, for the purpose of regulat- 
ing, can be opened to the required 
extent. 

The apparatus employed in the 
factories of Saratow for the pur- 
pose of burning petroleum in a 
gaseous condition, consistsof a hori- 
zontal conductor arranged above 
the fire chamber from which the 
petroleum is conducted through a 
Starting pipe into a small pipe 
from which conducting pipes of 
the same diameter lead to a vault. 
The influx is regulated by means 
of a slide. For the purpose of 
kindling the fuel is reduced to a 
minimum. After the walls have 
been heated, the admission of air 
is increased little by little. When 
combustion is in progress the oil 
is converted into gas and is forced 
through the burner. Then it burns 
with an elongated flame which 
reaches to the furnace. The ele- 
vation of the supply is regulated 
according to the thickness of the 
burning material and is adjusted 
to the temperature desired,- it 
ranges between i and 2 m. 

Both of the systems described 
can be employed for direct heat- 
ing with petroleum. They are dis- 
tinguished by their great simpli- 
city, but the escaped gases can be 



used only for heating steam boil- 
ers. Moreover, the temperature 
is limited in the same degree as 
with oil stoves, since the two com- 
bustible elements are carbon and 
hydrogen'and the combustion tem- 
perature of the hydrogen in the 
cold air at Dowson amounts to 
only r,97o°, while on the other 
hand that of the carbon amounts 
to 2,040°; the temperature, how- 
ever, never amounts to more than 
1,600° in theory, and in reality it 
never attains this height. 
: A higher temperature can only 
be reached by a greater heating 
pf the air, and for this purpose an 
apparatus serves which was con- 
structed by a Russian, Prof. Krup- 
sky, and formerly employed only 
in the glass factories; but this is 
likewise serviceable in metallur- 
gical establishments. In this ap- 
paratus the petroleum is con 
ducted through a pipe into the 
upper part of a chamber, where 
it is converted into gas and burns 
under the admission of air, and is 
conducted into the lower part of 
the same chamber; a second re- 
generation chamber serves for 
heating the air which completes 
the burning at the entrance into 
the furnace, There are two rows 
of the same sort of chambers es- 
tablished whereby the function is 
regulated by a set apparatus, ac- 
cording to the kind of Siemens' 
furnace used. The burning of pe- 



troleum by dissipation was first 
employed in a Martin-Siemens' 
furnace by the Metallurgische 
Gesellschaft in Moscow. The 
burner employed for this consists 
of an Inner pipe into which the 
petroleum is conducted and which 
is encircled by an outer pipe ter- 
minating in a conical point into 
which compressed air is admitted 
through a pipe branching from 
the same. This contrivance is not 
directly joined to the mason work 
inclosing the fire chamber, but is 
extended by a system of pipes for 
the circulation of water which im- 
pedes the kindling. 

The Martin-Siemens' furnaces of 
the Moscow works are arranged as 
follows: The regeneration burn- 
ers placed under the fire chamber 
are only two in number, since 
they serve only to heat the air. 
On both sides of the same perpen- 
dicular heat canals are constructed, 
which combine the burners with 
the fuel. At the upper ends of 
the air admitter there are two 
burners on the vault or the per- 
pendicular walls which are par- 
allel to the long side of the fur- 
nace and lean against the reser- 
voir. By inserting a device the 
two chambers can be joined as 
well to the outer air as to the 
chimney, so that the two : dissipat- 
ing groups can work alternately. 
A fifth burner placed in the cen- 
ter of the furnace is uninterrupted 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7f6-in., 5|^-in. and 
4j-3-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6 in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

11T North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



in activity and is employed in 
every installation of this kind, so 
that its flame is always in accord 
with the arrangements of the other 
burner*. The compressed air can 
be replaced by steam for the pur- 
pose of dissipation, which is intro- 
duced under a pressure of 4 kg.: 
the middle burner can also be left 
out without disadvantage. For 
the regulation of the admission 
of air and of the draught into 
the chimney automatic dampers 
serve as such and are regulated 
by the consumption of steam, 
compressed air and petroleum. 
The installations described above 
are applied to the Martin fur- 
naces of 15 to 25 t. The kind of 
arrangements are different in sin- 
gle works, but the principle ar- 
rangements and the functions re- 
main the same. 

Herewith it is to be observed 
that the arrangement of two air 
chambers in the petroleum fur- 
naces guarantees a more complete 
combustion of the fuel than with 
that of four chambers in gas fur- 
naces. With the latter only half 
of the air used for burning is em- 
ployed, while the other half is 
used up in a cold condition in the 
gas developer; on the other hand, 



the heat generated by heating the 
gases requires very little render- 
ing strength since this abandons 
the generation of gas in a heated 
condition. In the petroleum fur- 
naces, on the contrary, almost all 
the air employed for burning goes 
through the chambers, and one is 
therefore in a position to attain 
the same results as in a gas fur- 
nace where a double regeneration 
of the primary and secondary air 



takes place. Moreover, the ren- 
dering power through the double 
regeneration at a temperature of 
1,500^, amounts to 90 per cent, 
theoretically, while the regenera- 
tion through the secondary air 
and gas, as it is generally used, 
yields a theoretical rendering 
power of 66.3 per cent. The ma- 
jority of petroleum furnaces tor 
rolling mills are, like the Martin 
furnaces, provided with two '< 



chambers, and the two bunu 
each end of the furnace, which 
are placed above the air in- 
lets. The steam injectors arc not 
always practicable with this ar- 
rangement, since they oxidize the 
metal. One therefore advantage- 
ously employs compressed air 
whereby the pressure which does 
DOt usually exceed 50 cm. can be 
attained through an ordinary ven- 
tilator. 



(Continued en page 9.) 



T 11 )•; . 



Large Dome, Two Sheet 
Boiler 



I SAVES MONEY] 

Consumes Less Fuel than any other. 

Dry Steam always assured. 

Fitted for 



Oil Well or Stationary Work | 



Write for Prices 

R. if. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Monthly Exports of Oil from San Francisco. 





Mineral, Crude, 


Mineral, Refinfd, or Manufactured. 


Countries. 


INCLUDING NAT- 
URAL OILS, WITH- 
OUT REGARD TO 
GRAVITY. 


Naphtha, including 
All Lighter Prod- 
ucts of Distillation. 


Illuminating. 


Lubricating 

and Heavy Paraffine 

Oils. 


Residuum, including 

Tar and a'l other 
from which the light 
bodies have been dis- 
tilled. 




Gallons 


Value 


' Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Bbls. 


Value 


September, 1902. 


800 

158 


J, 8 
9 
























100 
1,770 
5,300 
2,167 
3,7io 


$23 
275 
r.n^I 
395 
665 


1,832 


$429 








no 


$19 












280 
757 

7,176 
150 

2,„o8 


99 
229 

1,734 

57 
577 












































































45° 

160 

7,92o 

I5,"34 
300 


S5 

46 

1,131 

2,8So 

55 






























150- 
22,894 


21 
3,195 


50 

270 

27 


33 

168 

14 








19,052 


55o 














20,010 


$607 


23,154 


$3,235 


37,4ir 


|6,7S6 


12,850 


$3,340 






October, 1902. 














156 


$107 
















580 

4,55o 
2S0 

8,811 
55o 
550 
770 


$109 

879 

61 

1,595 

74 

80 

154 












1 




40 


20 






























50 
23 


35 
8 






































9;i3o 


$1,198 
















742 
500 


168 
112 


































1,650 

4,620 

28,740 

20 


214 

872 

5,477 

5 


























597,912 


$19,930 


44; 850 


5,086 


2,625 


823 














597,912 


$19,030 


53.980 


$6. 284 


51,121 


$9,520 


4.136 


$1,273 






November. 1902. 










1,350 

4,550 


$272 

QOl 




















200 


$75 












440 


$66 


800 ] 150 


























720 


131 


4,150 
200 


820 
30 


40 

579 
2,000 


26 
225 
515 






































300 


5S 

















101 

307 

1,663 


57 
150 
532 












































140 


28 












7,810 


882 


416 

1,080 

11,203 


229 

43' 5 

5,059 












2,131 | 32s 

107,581 [ 15,265 

1,360 | 280 








1,364,000 


$43,100 


23,377 


3,074 














1.364,000 


£43, loo 


32,347 


$4153 


122,752 1 If 18. 174 


$i7.58q 


$7,298 









In loot the total exports fiom San Francisco for September October and November were 88,415 gallono, valued at $19,097. 
In 1902 the total oil exports for the same months were 2,337,262 gallons, valued at $123,700. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

■indorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners' Association 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 



















STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-31.33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



No attention will be paid to letters In- 
quiring concerning the standing off oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order ffor two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal. 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY.. DECEMBER 19, 1902 



On January 3rd the Pacific Oil 
Reporter will 
The New Year issue its annual 
Edition New Year's 

edition. This 
number will consist of forty-eight 
pages, and will contain articles 
upon every oil field in the State. 
There will also be articles from 
some of the best known scientists, 
geologists and chemists in the 
State upon subjects connected 
with various branctes of the oil 
industry. 

The edition will contain 
half-tone reproductions of recent 
photographs of all the various 
fields. There will be maps of the 
Kern River, McKittrick, Sunset, 
Midway and Coalinga fields, each 
of which is brought up to date. 
These maps are very valuable, 
and if the edition contained noth- 
ing else would cause it to be in 
great demand. 

We can truthfully state that the 
New Year's edition of the Pacific 
Oil Reporter will be the most 
valuable publication ever issued 
either on the California or any 
other oil field. 



Flash Test of Fuel Oil. 

The California Petroleum Miners' As- 
sociation has started the ball rolling for 
the legal establishment here of a higher 
flash test of crude oil used as fuel, which 
is evidently needed. It has been im- 
pelled to adopt this course because of 
the revelations made of the low grade of 
the oil with which the tanks of the un- 
fortunate steamship " Progreso" were 
supplied, to which fact and to the lack 
of proper ventilation the explosion of 
her oil tanks is now generally attributed. 
The association has, therefore, petitioned 
the board of supervisors to pass an ordi- 
nance requiring that "all oil furnished 
for fuel purposes in boilers" shall stand 
"a flash test of not less than 150° 
Fahrenheit." The ordinance now in 
force fixes tne flash test at no ; but this 
is regarded as too low. Besides, there is 
a disposition on the part of large dealers 



In fuel oil to adulterate the heavier 
grades of crude petroleum which do not 
flash at aoo° Fahrenheit with lighter 
oils which flash at much lower tempera- 
tures than the legal limit. This is done 
on the assumption that the mixture will 
retain permanently the flash test esta- 
blished by the combination. Many of 
the best experts in oil condemn the 
practice, however, and assert that after 
the mixed oils cool the separation of 
their constituents sets in, ending in the 
lighter oils ascending to the surface and 
the heavier ones settling to the bottom 
of the tanks. Then follows the rapid 
disintegration of the more volatile ele- 
ments in the combination and a genera- 
tion of gas, which, when mixed with 
the air in the tank, becomes a danger- 
ous explosive compound. 

The Petroleum Miners' Association 
advocates a higher flash test, because it 
will give less room for the use of light 
oil adulterants in the crude petroleum 
sold for fuel purposes. The object of its 
petition is the protection of the oil min- 
ers' interests; but it is equally in the in- 
terest of the safety of the public, which 
the use of a low flash-test oil as fuel puts 
seriously in jeopardy. The wells of the 
State are producing an abundance of 
heavy crude petroleum which will not 
flash under 200 Fahrenheit. Oil of 



against William W. Klinger and 
Hugo K. Asber to cancel a lease 
to the north half of north half of 
section 19, township 29 south, 
range 29 east. The plaintiff al- 
leges that the lease has been for- 
feited by reason of the defendant's 
failure to comply with the terms 
thereof. 

The Southern P cific Railroad 
company has commenced a suit 
against A. M. Bienenfeld, D. Burk- 
halter and William II Mason to 
cancel a lease for the south half 
of north half of section 35, town- 
ship 30 south, range 22 east. The 
plaintiff alleges that the defend- 
ants have not carried out the 
terms of the lease. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

The predictions made in the editorial 
columns of the Oil, REPORTEK many 
months ago to the effect that the oil sit- 
uation in California was then greatly im- 
proved and would continue to improve 
have been verified to the letter, and no 
belter evidence of their realization could 
be wanted than that of the improved 



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OUR NEW YEAR'S EDITION. 






The annual New Year's edition of the Pacific Oil 
Reporter will be published January 3rd. 

This edition will be noteworthy among oil publi- 
cations which have heretofore appeared, not only on 
account of its beautiful appearance, but more espe- 
cially on account of its contents. 

It will contain a number of special articles from 
those prominent as scientists, geologists, practical 
drillers, and successful oil men generally. 

It will cover every oil district in the State. 

It will be beautifully illustrated with half tone re- 
productions. 

It will contain statistical information that will be 
exact and reliable. 



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that grade, says the Chronicle, is abso- 
lutely the safest fuel that can be used, 
and, when confined in properly ven- 
tilated tanks, contains no element of dan- 



ger. The Supervisors are, presumably, 



interested in securing perfect safety to 
the public, and they should have no 
hesitation in complying with the petition 
of the California Petroleum Miners' As- 
sociation, which calls for a safe flash test 
in all oil used as fuel. 



OIL LAND SUITS. 



The Southern Pacific Sues to 
Recover Oil Land. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad 
company has commenced a suit 
against A. M. Bienenfeld, J. J. 
Mack, J. M. Keith, D. Burkhalter, 
and the Limited Oil company of 
California to cancel a lease for the 
east half of the northwest quarter 
of section 7, township 29 south, 
range 28 east. The plaintiff al- 
leges the defendants have failed 
to comply with the terms of the 
lease. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad 
company has commenced a suit 



prices for the better-known oil stocks on 
the Los Angeles Exchange. During the 
past few weeks there has been a steady 
advance in the price of nearly all oil 
securities. This in turn has been re- 
flected not only by the smaller listed 
companies, but also by some of the un- 
listed concerns. Among the listed stocks 
Reed Crude has advanced from 25 cents 
to 30 and 31 cents. Central, which was 
selling at 52 cents less than three months 
ago, is now selling at from 68 to 70 cents, 
having advanced 10 paints in the last 
two or three weeks. Columbia is also 
stronger and the same may be said of 
Fullerton Conso'idated. Duringtheweek 
just closed Fullerton oil has climbed up 
from 8 to 12J4 cents. Globe is strong at 
from 10 to 15 cents. Turner is now held 
at 15 cents above par. Union Oil and 
United Petroleum have both shown ap- 
preciable advances in the bidding col- 
umn during the past few days. Westlake, 
which has been a sort of a sad joke for a 
long time past, is coming in for its share 
of the increase which has resulted from 
the greatly improved condition now ob- 
taining in the oil industry. 

Among the unlisted oils trading is not 
so active, but prices are better than they 
have been in the past year. 

Mining stocks continue to absorb con- 
siderable attention from both investors 



and specula'ors. Golden Argus meets 
with a ready sale at f 16. Butte Lode is 
off a few points but may be expected to 
regain recent losses by the time another 
dividend is dec'ared. Bisbee West . is 
bid from 2 to 5 points above quotations 
of a couple of weeks ago. Green Con- 
solidated remains about stationary at 
practically New York prices closing bids 
for the week being $25.50. Of late there 
is a spasmodic demand for Red Cloud in 
consequence of which this stock has 
made material advances. There ap- 
pears a good demand for copper glance 
although very little trading has resulted, 
the last quotations being 40 bid, 47^ 
asked. Hudson Gold Mining company's 
shares continue in good demand at o}£ 
to cents. 

Bank stocks furnish the same old 
story of advancing premiums. There is 
scarcely a stock on the list that is not 
commanding a substantial premium 
above par, notwithstanding which how- 
ever the offerings are scarce and trading 
very inactive. 

Among the miscellaneous securities 
little is done on the floor of the exchange, 
most of the business being confined to 
the brokers' offices and the curb. 



Oil in the Orient. 

C. T. Luffkin, a Standard oil 
expert, recently talked to a Los 
Angeles reporter as follows about 
the market for. oil in Japan and 
the Orient, and the conditions of 
affairs in Sumatra: 

" Sumatra," said Mr. Luffkin, 
•'producers the finest oil in the 
world, but the difficulties to be 
met in mining are so great in that 
field that not more than 5,000 bar- 
rels are produced in the whole 
island. 

" It is impossible for white men 
to work any length of time there. 
There are no roads and no lum- 
ber, the only supply being the 
native lumber, whipsawed out of 
the logs on the spot. 

" The oil is very high grade 
paraffine, which comes out of the 
ground so clear as to be almost 
transparent, and though the mar- 
ket is there for it, the difficulties 
encountered by the producer are 
so great that it is next to impos- 
sible to get a guarantee supply 
to any amount. 

"A great market for the Cali- 
fornia oils is Japan and the Orient 
and this State can handle it with 
ease once the producers get down 
to business That market does 
not take a high grade of refined 
oil, but what they buy the con- 
sumers use in an open lamp, not 
unlike the ordinary oil torch. All 
over the Orient there are millions 
of these little lamps and they burn 
thousands of gallons of a second- 
grade refined oil, and as all refined 
oils give off a smoke when burned 
in an open lamp, it does not do to 
send a high-grade and expensive 
oil." 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents .or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds underwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



PACIFU I'ORTl R 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



and 1 

i pa ii y 






Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries In the Far West 



AI.AJIEPA 

The Mercantile Oil company is nego- 
tiating for the purchase of the old Camp- 
bell <'>lass Works property in Berkeley, 
the intention being to use it for oil refin- 
ing purposes. 

The Pacific States Refinery will scon 
be incorporated for the purpose of estab- 
lishing an oil refinery at Fruitvalc. J. W. 
Hastings is acting as organi/cr of the 
company. The refinery is to be erected 
on a plot of laud 400 feet square on I nut- 
vale avenue, near the tidal canal. 

ALASKA. 

Southern Alaska may rival the anthra- 
cite coal and oil production of Pennsyl- 
vania, according to Charles F. Sinclair, 
who has arrived at Tacoma from Katala 
bringing samples of oil together with a 
specimen of anthracite coal, which as- 
says np to 87 percent of pure carbon and 
3 percent ash. His oil well is adjacent 
to that of the Alaska Development com- 
pany, which is shipping four barrels to 
Pennsylvania to be refined. Tests made 
in Alaska show that Katala oil contains a 
large amount of naphtha and gasoline. 
It lights readily and burns like kerosene. 
The Alaska Development company con- 
tains 40,000 acres of oil lands, and has 
Capital sufficient to build a refinery at 
Katala, which it proposes doing if the oil 
tests sent east are satisfactory. Katala is 
less than 200 miles east of Valdez. Sin- 
clair says that adjacent veins of anthra- 
cite coal are from two to forty feet in 
thickness. They will be developed with 



the district, and 
ties arc 

It I 
crsfiv! re UN 

to furnish enough n 

ants were turning away hungry 1 

ami livery .stall. ■ ing a rushing 

• fourteen-mi'c railroad, which the Alas- ,n,M ' parlies were 

ka Development company wi 1 build ne\! '" ,1,c llcl,,s looking "P opportunities to 
spring. re land for Immed meat. 

There are unmistakable -inns that the 
ecting longing eye 
The Clark Refining company la now product of the Sunset and Midway Gelds, 



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To Newsdealers. 






Newsdealers should order in advance a large 
number of extra copies of the New Year's Kdition of 
thePACirrc Oil REPORTER. 

There will be a big demand. 

They will be sold at 10 cents, as usual. 



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getting out a large quantity of distillate 
and a fine grade of lamp oil. 

Union Oil company of Los Angeles has 
completed a storage reservoir in the Kern 
River field, 250 feet square and 27 feet 
deep, concrete lined, and having a capa- 
city of 20,000 barrels. The Standard 
company is constructing three reservoirs 
of equal size in the same field. 

Salt Lake capitalists have bought the 
old Kern Crown Oil company properties 
at Midway, in the San Joaquin valley, 



If the Midway-Pacific does not get a 
move on very quickly and give pro- 
ducers an earnest that they mean busi- 
ness, before Messrs Blake & Co. realize 
it, the Standard will have all the product 
corralled and the railroad scheme will go 
up in the air. 

The well of the Paraffine beyond Mc- 
Kittrick is among the deepest holes in 
the county, having reached 1,700 feet 
before work was discontinued, awaiting 
a decision by the stockholders regarding 
the company's future pol cy. When 



Ml in 

1 1 in thicknt- 
feet a 
ter.d, and another at 1,1 

utput for the per: nths 

Be Refining company, Ala- 

■ well of 

uoknou , it never having 

tested, the contract also permits the 
tarnish an indefinite amount, 
enough to make np the needsol there- 
lining compa of longer 
lif< wss refused. The Maricopa's pipe- 
line to the railroad terminus will be 1 
pleted within a short time, the material 
being now upon tin- ground. Tins line, 
while owned by the Maricopa, will be 
jointly used by tin- I. urn. the two com- 
panies being closely related. 

The Bakerfield Hardware company, H. 
C. Starns, Ulodgct and lewet, Sunset 

Supply company, Thomas ami frank 

I . and tin- : suing Tool 

company, have filed a petition in the 

Superior court to have the Tiger Oil 
company, an oil company operating at 
Kern River, declared an insolvent debt- 
or. The amounts claimed by each are 
as follows: Bakersfiebl Hardware com- 
pany, $227.12; Jewet & Blodget, 1211.69; 
Sunset Supply coinpiny, f 16.92; Cheney 
Brothers, {51.41; Bishop fishing Tool 
company, {.',5. and II. C. Starns, {77.50. 
The petitioners allege that the defen- 
dant is and has been insolvent since 
November 10, when its property was at- 
tached by order of the Superior court at 
San f rancisco in the case of M. S. 
Matthews vs. the Tiger Oil company. 

The Associated is returning in several 
instances to fields of original work, ap- 
parently having discarded the idea that 
it would concentrate its energies imon 
only one or two of the richest tracts it 
possesses. Not long since, says the Cai. 



INVESTIGATION Mil INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Kern County, Cab, situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present operations is in famous Section 2, Township ir, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Well No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 cents A SHARE 



WILL LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that you act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value {1. 00) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment. We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member alifornia Petroleum Winers' Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and Postoffice Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

ELK BORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 

470-471-472 Parrott Building SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ifornian, all the outlying properties were 
dismantled of their machinery and left 
vacant. The Chicago Crude was among 
the scenes of former activity where the 
lease was left idle. The Associated has 
now restored the machinery in part, and 
is pumping one well and preparing to 
pump another. The southwest quarter 
of 30, formerly owned by Green & Whit- 
tier, is again the place of some work. 
Less than two weeks after the lease had 
been stripped of everything in the way 
of drilling tools and pumping machi- 
ne^, an outfit was moved back and a 
well which was merely put down to the 
sands for the purpose of making a 
valid discovery, is now to be sunk deep- 
er and a second well is to be pumped. 
The Associated also cleaned off the Tol- 
tec, but later restored the pumps on one 
well, but, curiously, wasted the oil upon 
the ground. This oil ran down a can- 
yon and across a public road, interfering 
with travel. A threat to set fire to it 
caused a change in methods, and, since, 
the oil has been pumped into reservoirs. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Tuesday of last week a quarterly divi- 
dend of one and one half percent, pay- 
able in January, was declared by the 
Central Oil company of Whittier. The 
production of the wells is reported to be 
about 20,000 barrels a month. The de- 
mand for the lighter grades of oil from 
the Whittier field is active, the Central 
shipping two hundred carloads this 
month from Los Nietos. 

Details of a transaction of importance 
to the petroleum industry of southern 
California have been made public by the 
Erkekbrecher syndicate of Los Angeles. 
Over 4,000 acres of land have been ac- 
quired by this syndicate some twelve 
miles west of Santa Monica and just 
north of the Malibu ranch, owned by F. 
H. Rindge. The district, which lies a 
mile or so back from the ocean beach, 



although undeveloped, is one of the 
most promising new fields in the State. 
Live-oil seepages, oil sands and gas 
blowouts are to be found, and, accord- 
ing to experts, who have examined 
the formation along the coast and in the 
numerous canyons, there are indications 
that oil will be discovered in abundance. 
The chief feature of the district, how- 
ever, is the fact that the best evidences 
of oil indicate that, if found, the oil will 



SANTA BARBARA. 

The Pinal company began pumping 
oil last Saturday. The ground for well 
No. 2 is now being gotten ready, and 
operations for another well will begin at 
once. The Brookshire company, which 
owns the adjoining land, will put down a 
well very soon. 

The new well of the Pinal Oil com- 
pany is down 1,590 feet, and it has been 
ascertained that there are 1,000 feet of 



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Do you want to sell oil well machinery and sup- 
plies? 

Have you oil land to sell? 

Do you want to buy oil land? 

Do you want to sell the stocks of a first-class oil 
company? 

If you do then send in your advertisement for the 
New Year's edition of the Pacific Oil Reporter. 

An edition of 25,000 copies will be printed, ele- 
gantly illustrated. 

Advertisements must be sent by December 29th. 



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be of light gravity, suitable for refining. 
The company expects to have a rig on 
the ground within ten days, and opera- 
tions will be commenced without delay. 
The new district is within easy access to 
all the markets of the State. 
SAN BENITO. 

The Riley company is still at work on 
the Vallecitas. 

The Ladd Oil company is still wrest- 
ling with its well near Emmet. 



oil in the hole. The well has 8-inch cas- 
ing. A 600-barrel tank is now being 
erected, and a survey is being made for 
a pipe-line to the line of the Pacific 
Coast Railway near Graciosa and also to 
the beet sugar factory at Betteravia. 
Drilling will at once commence on a new 
well. 

SANTA CLARA. 

Frank Gaffey, secretary of the Wat- 
sonville Coast Oil company, says there 



is no foundation for tbe report that E. V. 
Burke of San Francisco and Win. M. 
Beggs of San Jose have any contract with 
his company looking to the development 
of the gas well on the GafFey tract.. The 
company has not abandoned the proper- 
ty, which is regarded as' a good invest- 
ment, and the matter of developing the 
gas well is now under consideration. The 
presence of a large body of natural gas 
has been demonstrated, and work on the 
well may be resumed at any time:— Gil- 
roy Advocate. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

LOMA PRIETA PRUNE RANCH COMPANY. 
Principal place of business, San Francisco. 
Location of ranch, Monterey County, California. 
Notice —There is delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of the assessment 
levied on the ioth day of November, 1902, the sev- 
eral amounts set opposite the names of the re- 
spective stockholders. 

SHARES AMOt'NT 

Geo. J. Bucknall 5 $25,00 

Eliz. C. Culver, Ex'l'x 10 5000 

C. T. Deane.... 1 , 5 00 

James Jerome 2 1000 

Jas. F. Muiihead 2 jo 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors made on the roth day of Nov- 
ember, 1902, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be Fold at public 
auction at the office ol Madison & Burke, 30 
Montgomery St., San Francisco, California, on 
Friday, the 9th day of January, 1903 to pf.y tbe 
delinquent assessment, togethei with the costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order o! the Board of Directors. 

FRANK MORTON, Secretary. 



SOME MEN PAY 

S10 00O^ oranex P er " oman " 

age their advertis- 
ing. There are others who pay 
$5.00 f° r an annualsu bscrlp- 
* tion to PRINTERS' 

INK and learn what all the adver- 
tisers are thinking about. Buteven 
these are not the extrt mes reached . 
There are men $100,000 
who lose over ___^__ 
a year by doing neither one. 
For sample send ro cents to PRINTERS* 
INK, No. 10 Spruce St., New York CHy. 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that buys the oil and pays fl.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes THE HIGHEST GRADE Gaso- 
line, BENZINE AND KEROSENE OF ANY REFINERY ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 



$80 buys 100 Shares in each of four- companies, op 
400 shares full-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment. 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
33T percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 450 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
900,000 shares held in trust by us. 



The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

''There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52 Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade f or illuminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity that has ever come to this State slip into compantively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because the}- did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
any speculative venture, but in actually proven lands, which '■ can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $5,000 per acre, and which in a few 
years will be worth five times that price." 



Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three. Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates 900,000 shares. 
We act as trustee foi this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will be taken up and the pooled 
stock ot the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus if -three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
payer the investment would still yield 12^ percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 



THE DEBENTURE; SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELDS. One ci m- 
pany is pumping 52 gravity oil, selling it at J1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1,150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well ; third company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset, 
and land holdings, drilling rig, and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 

INDEX. 

Facts Worth Reading » Costly Advertising 

Investigations Why Some Coiporations Fail 

Trust Fund..... Our Plan 

Debentures A Word About Our Business 

Experienced Management , A Good Thing to Do 

A Word of Caution , ; Satisfied Stockholders , 

Our Invariable Rule The Percent of Failures \ , 

No Man Always Knows A Refinery \ t 

Loans to Customers Maps and Photographs 

Our Profits Ten Reasons Why 

The Big Four The Price of Oil '.'.'.'.'.'.', 

Directors of The Oil Companies Press Notes 

Reports Upon The Property Faithin Oil / . 

Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 
THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL Oil, PROPOSITION : 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade cil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 

Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(1NCOBPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTKR 



Russian Iron Works. 

The Storing and Distribution of 
the Petroleum — The petroleum is 
transported from Baku tothe place 
of consumption in ships upon the 
Volga. But since the ship's course 
is interrupted by ice during half 
the year the iron works which 
use liquid fuel almost exclusively 
are obliged to store the same in 
large quantities, even as much as 
30,000 tons. Thes? supplies are 
kept in cylindrical metal tanks, 
with a capacity of about 3,000 to 
4,000 each. In addition to these 
one uses large covered cisterns 
with a capacity for 16,000 tons. 

The petroleum is forced into the 
ships by means of pumps, and 
from these is put into the receiv- 
ers in the same manner. In order 
to put this from the largest reser- 
voirs into the smaller, which are- 
situated in the different places of 
consumption, the petroleum is 
pumped into suitable intermediate 
reservoirs placed at an adequate 
height from which it is conducted 
to the places of consumption by 
means of pipes. 

The question of the employ- 
ment of petroleum in metallur- 
gical work's seems to be complete- 
ly solved nowadays, as the num- 
erous factories established in the 
vicinity of the Volga demonstrate 
by having overcome the difficul- 
ties encountered in its employ- 
ment. Of all the metallurgical in- 
dustries it is only the foundries 
which are exluded herefrom, but 
it is true that certain factories in 
the Ural Mountains are seeking 
to employ petroleum in furnaces 
in order to save wood. 

The employment of petroleum 
as a fuel, instead of oil gas, espe- 
cially for the purpose of heating 
the Martin furnaces, is very im- 
portant, since with this the steel 
retains no foreign substances, and 
by employing pure crude material 
one can be sure of obtaining an 
equally pure metal. Unfortunate- 
ly, during the past few years pe- 
troleum has experienced an in- 
crease in price which has consid- 
erably increased the cost of man- 
ufacturing. But it is hoped that 
within a short time an equaliza- 
tion between these and the price 
of oil will be made, and that not- 
withstanding some geographical 
disadvantage of the situation for 
factories, the employment of this 
fuel will be general in the Volga 
region.— Napthta. 



HIGHER PRICES. 



Increasing Consumption Stead- 
ily Raising the Price of Oil. 

The fear that the production of 
oil would for many years swamp 
the market, because of the enor- 
mous amounts yielded by the 
Kern River field, had, probably, 
the largest effect in bringing down 
the price from a dollar a barrel to 
ten cents, the rate prevailing not 
long ago. 

It was a bewildering situation, 
and those who felt that the pro- 



digious quantities capable of be- 
ing produced would constantly 
tend to overcome any upward ten- 
dendy of the market, had good 
grounds; and, those who professed 
that they anticipated no such re- 
sult, alleging their belief that the 
consumption would more than 
offset the output, spoke with 
somewhat of hesitancy. It cer- 
tainly did appear that the abun- 
dance of oil would bring disaster 
to those who held it. 

However, it is becoming evi- 
dent that the latter were right. 
The Bakersfield Californian says 
consumption has increased amaz- 
ingly, and the future is rich in 
promise of still greater expansion. 
The greatest users, the railroads, 
are not yet nearly equipped for 
the using of the new fuel, there 
remaining steam-generating plant 
after plant still burning coal. The 
ocean steamers have hardly begun 
to enter as consumers. New man- 
ufacturing establishments are grad- 
ually springing up; the elevation 
of water for irrigating purposes 
is certain to become one of the 
most important features of agri- 
cultural California; the Standard 
has not refined a barrel of oil in 
the immense works it has erected 
at Point Richmond, and plants for 
the conversion of oil into other ar- 
ticles of commerce are yet to be 
brought into being. 

From the standpoint of the pro- 
ducer the outlook is excellent for 
better prices because of the facts 
enumerated in the foregoing. 
But there is another reason why 
the price should never be as low 
as it has been in the past nor as 
low again as it is to-day. That 
reason is simply that the high 
hopes of those who first operated 
in the Kern River field arid of 
those who got in when the craze 
was at its height, have been sub- 
ject to discount and the discount 
is in process of being computed. 

Startlingly large wells have 
dropped down into producers once 
reckoned as second class, those of 
the second class, have gone down 
one degree in turn and the natu- 
ral outcome is being experienced. 
The invariable history of oil fields 
is being duplicated here, decrease 
in capacity following the first 
years of pumping. 

An extreme instance is reported 
of four wells which are located 
near the edge of the field, but 
which were deemed to be good 
for 100 barrels a day each, have 
during the past few months 
yielded an amount much less. 

Thus, the consumption is seen 
to be rapidly overtaking produc- 
tion and production is naturally 
falling off. The two circumstances 
taken together form a basis for a 
prediction of higher prices than 
we have been accustomed to, rul- 
ing indefinitely. 

Thb Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of an\ 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices In all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Fighting the Mosquitoes. 

The South Orange (N. J.) Im- 
provement club has met with 
great success in its work of ex- 
teiminating the mosquito which is 
the greatest pest of one of the 
most charming sections of the 
Eastern coast. According to the 
report of the chairman, Spencer 
Miller, in 1901, by the use of oil 



alone the mosquiti re- 

duced 50 per cent. ' The present 
da Mr. Miller, "by add- 
ing drainage to the oil work we 

have sn rely CUt down the supply 
75 per cent. We can hope an- 
other year to reduce the supply 
10 per cunt more, but that is the 
best we can do until the surround- 
ing communities take up the ti^ht. 
The area we ha\ e been treating 
is two miles long and one and 
three-quarters wide. This year 
we expended $1,100 and our re- 
sults are much more emphatic 
than last year. Ten thousand 
dollars spent at once would drain 
ami fill every wet spot in town 
and the problem would take care 
of itself." 



IN TIIK. SUPERIOR COURT OF Till- 
AND CODNTY OF SAN FRAN. 
B OP CALIFORNIA. 

In the matter of the Estate or Mary T. P. Flynn. 

deceased. 

a I lie reading and filing ofthe verified pe- 
tition of Hugh Plynu Administrator of the Estate 
of Mary T. P. Flynn. deceased; It is hcrehy or- 
dered that all persons interested in the estate of 
Mary T. V. Flynn. deceased, be and they are 
hereby required to be and appear in the Su- 
perior Court of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California in the Courtroom of 
said Court department 9 thereof in the City Hall 
of said cilv and County on the roth day of Janu- 
ary 1903 at 10 o'clock a m. of that day to show 
cause, if any they have why the realty belonging 
to said estate and hereinafter described should 
not be mortgaged for the sum of twenty-seven 
bundled dollars or such lesser amount as to the 
Court shall seem meet; reference to said petition 
Is hereby made for further particulars. 

The really referred to is described as follows: 
Commencing at a point on the Southeasterly line 
of Minna street, distant thereon 368 feet 9 Inches 
southwesterly from the southwesteily line fof 
Fourth street, thence southwesterly along said 
line of Minna street 23 feet q inches, thence at 
right angles southeasterly 80 feet thence at 
right angles Northeasterly 23 feet 9 inches 
thence at right angles northwesterly 80 feet to 
the point of commencement, and beifga portion 
of 100 Vara lot No. 133, in said City and County 
of San Francisco. 

It is further ordered that notice of this order 
be given by the publication thereof for four suc- 
cessive weeks, at least once a week before the 
time appointed for said hearing in the PACIFIC 
Oil Reporter, a newspaper published in said 
City and County. Dated December 17th, T902. 
J. V. COFFEY, Judge. 



A BONANZA 
INVESTMENT 



The Colombian Oil, Asphalt and Refin= 
ing Company, 

of California, has the largest and most valuable deposit 
of LIQUID ASPHALT yet discovered in this country; 
has its own REFINERY of over 400 barrels daily ca- 
pacity, which was started up on November 1st, and as 
the asphalt produced contains several by-products of 
great commercial value, the company should be able to 
earn and pay very heavy dividends, in fact, so large as 
to warrant the stock advancing to par in the nest few 
weeks, and probably to several hundred per cent pre- 
mium by the first of the new year. The stock is now 
selling at only 4^ CENTS PER SHARE ($45 per thou- 
sand) which is just 45 cents on the dollar, and the 
FIRST QUARTERLY DIVIDEND HAS BEEN 
PROMISED FOR JANUARY 1ST. Invest now and 
have your stock share in the first dividend. Write or 
call at once for reports, photographs of the refinery and 
the fullest information. 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 



2 KILBY ST., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

Wednesday, December 17, 1902. 

Business has been fairly active on the 
Exchange during the past week. 

Peerless more than regained the drop 
of last week, selling up to $13.00 on Tues- 
day, but weakening off slightly to-day. 
Home continues firm, selling up to $3.15. 
Buyer 30. Monte Cristo is weaker, sales 
having been made as low as $1.35. Ster- 
ling also has lost ground, selling down 
to $1.65. Apollo has advanced some- 
what, 30 cents being now bid, without 
calling out much stock. Hanford is 
higher, selling up to $93.50. Indepen- 
dence has failed to carry the assessment 
of l)n cents delinquent in office last 
Monday, and has sold at 7 cents, with 
more offering at that figure. 

Sugar stocks, which had quite a tum- 
ble the latter part of the week just past. 
took on a better tone within the last few 
days, and an improvement is noticeable 
all along the line, particularly in Ha- 
waiian-Commercial, Makeweli and Paau- 
hau. 

Equitable (Pool) Gas sold at $3.00. 



Only Three Fields. 

Years have served to emphasize 
the fact that there are only three 
fields in the United States that 
can be so denominated. These 
are the California field, the Ohio- 
Indiana field and the Pennsyl- 
vania-Virginia fields. All others 
are ephemeral. The Texas gushers 
have gone to sleep, and salt water 
is their pillow; in Kentucky, 
Kansas and other middle western 
sections the experiments still re- 
main clothed in knee breeches, 
while many well advertised sec- 
tions are in swaddling clothes, 
and secretly nourished from the 
bottle that holds the seductive 
printer's ink. — Los Angeles Her- 
ald. 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 17: 

APOLLO. 

500 at $ ' 30 I 150 00 

FOUR. 

60 1,500 00 

59 590 00 

HANFORD. 

2 at 92 00 184 00 

3 at 93 00 279 00 

1 at 93 50 93 50 

HOME OIL. 

3 05 610 00 

3 15 (B 30) 630.00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

08 8 00 

07 189 00 



2,500 at 
1,000 at 



200 at 
200 at 



100 at 
2,700 at 
1,400 at 
1,000 at 

200 at 



06. 

07 (B 90) . 

06 (S 15). 



LION. 



100 at 



05- 



JUNCTION. 



84 00 
70 00 
12 00 



5 00 



2,500 at 10 25000 

KERN. 
50 at 3 95 197 50 



MONARCH. 



300 at 1 67 Yl 402 50 

100 at 1 67 >£ (B 10) 167 50 

100 at 1 70 170 00 

THIRTY-THREE. 

200 at 7 75 1,550 00 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 

500 at 1 50 750 00 



21,226 Shares Amount $21,752 93 

EQUITABLE (POOL) GAS. 

125 at 300 375 00 



125 Shares 



Amount $375 00 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L. CHENEY, Secretary 
514-5 15 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



725 at 
100 at 



IS. 

'9- 



130 So 
19 00 



500 at 
100 at 



1,200 at 



J. S. BWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building, Sixth Floor, Roomg. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Building, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, S. F. 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 



ANALYSIS AND. REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 

ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



MONTE CRISTO. 

1 35 675 00 

1 iV/z 137 50 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

13 156 00 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

2,883 at 16 461 28 

PEERLESS. 

200 at 11 %T>/ Z 2,375 00 

279 at 12 00 3,348 00 

75 at 12 75 95 6 25 

300 at 13 00 3,900 00 

REED CRUDE. 

30 62 40 

STERLING. 

62^ 650 00 

65 990 00 



Tei Mint 2791 San Francisco 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write J. D. Johnston, 
Newport, R. I, 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



PEERLESS OIL COMPANY— ON DECEM- 
ber 1st declared a dividend No. 9, of ten (to) 
cents per share, payable January 1, 1903. Books 
close December 26, 190?. 

The address of stockholder W. I. Taze is desired. 
GURDON BRADLEY, Assistant Secretary. 



GOLD! 



Always at Par. 



Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owns rich gold properties in Arizona; 
active work now in progress, to continue 
which stock is being sold at 



JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ, 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL, EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 385 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Home," "Kern" and 'Monarch" (of Arizona). 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"Gold Mountain Consolidated," "Montana Tonopah" and "Mizpah Extension." 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Cecil R." and "Grass Valley Consol." 

Mexican Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Tarasca." 
and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks. 
Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Whenever there is any notable development in a company or change in the 
price of stocks, my clients interested in same at once receive such information by 
wire or mail, without further charge. I also engage to keep you fully posted on 
your purchases made through my agency and thus oftentimes put you in a posi- 
tion to acquire desirable stock at low prices. 

Write to undersigned for prices before buying elsewhere; also for informa- 
tion regarding Oil and Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, re- 
turning 10 percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

330 Pioe Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Business College and 
School of Engineering 



THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughting, 
Strength of Matenals. and Surveyiog. 

THE MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis, Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Mining. Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics. 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
Practical, "Work Shop and Laboratory Practice Construction, Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics, etc. 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of abusiness education. Day and Evening Classes. 

BST VVr-i te for new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 



10 



CENTS 

A 
SHARE 



Par Value $1.00 

Full Paid, 

Absolutely 
Non-Assessable. 



208 at 



400 at 
600 at 



When present block has been subscribed 
price will be advanced to 20 cents per 
share. Send for particulars. Bank ref- 
erence. 

W. J. Young & Co., Fiscal Agents, 

62S-630 Ivaughlin Building, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. F0R6IE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, th« 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal.. Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench 



For carrying and placing 
bits in drilling stem boxes 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best aDd latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND 'MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 






FACIF1C OIL RKH.hlKK 



Tank Cars in Texas. 

If there are any tank car makers 
who are short of work, it would 
appear to be a pro6tabIe proceed- 
ing lor them to send representa- 
tives down to Texas to take or- 
ders. They are yet short of cars 
there — the railroads, the oil com- 
panies and individual operators. 
The railroads recently agreed to 
the following arrangement for the 
distribution of cars for the oil 
fields: 

"Those who wish to use the 
cars have to apply to the super- 
intendent or person in charge, 
stating the number of tank cars 
required. Three days' notice 
have to be given for ten cars or 
less, six days for fifty, and ten 
days for more, and these appli 
cations will be taken in order of 
receipt. The maximum number 
of cars one person can hire is ten, 
fifty for every ten days, and 150 
per month. A deposit has to be 
given to the extent of one-fourth 
of the amount of the freight 
charges unless otherwise agreed. 

The cars have to be used within 
forty-eight hours after delivery to 
applicant. Failing this, the de- 
posit is forfeited and the cars re- 
claimed." 

But this arrangement itself indi- 
cates that not enough tank cars 
are available to meet the demands 
Troubles therefore continue over 
failures to fulfill contracts which 
were made in anticipation of the 
provision of better shipping facili- 
ties by rail than have yet de 
veloped. 



tou'ou'pu't of tbe^SaVmonu' Opportunities in a Lifetime 

being a little more than 50.000 
barr. 



They Burn Oil. 

Out of the twenty ferry boats 
and river steamers owned by the 
Southern Pacific company, sixteen 
are of the type that consume oil 
as fuel. This includes all of the 
craft floated by the company with 
the exception of the little fruit 
boats. 

The "Amador" and "Bay City," 
two of the large boats, are not 
provided with oil-buratng fac - 
ities, but it is announced that they 
will soon be converted into oil- 
burners. The change would have 
been made long ago, but it was 
decided to be unwise to substitute 
the new fuel while the boats were 
provided with their old-fashioned 
and worn out boilers. It is the 
plan to build new boilers for each 
of these two boats and then they 
will be converted into oil-burners. 
The change will be made about 
the first of next year. 



pVCNKT FKTROLKCM CO 

Capital 1150.000 

50.000 ihim at iy 

LoomUm— firao county. 

Hirrctora— Chaa. L Pair. pr«,lrnl. Bllta W Pu- 
too. Ttcc-prneicnt. Chaa. A. L«. treasurer, John 
C. McKlroy. secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel South 184. 



A. S. COOPER, C. k, I. E. 

Headquarters School, Government and 219 Crocker Building 




Oil Lands in California. 

> acre*. 
L,«rm» nU.nnd id all countic - 

cultivation, and enrrv all minerals uml ' 



^TANDAKD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 

Capita! Jsoo.000 

Treasury stock J.so.coo 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKitirtck; Bo acre* owned in Coalings near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acre* owned ad- 
Joining oil well in Napa valley 

Leased 6000 acres asphaltum land In Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Pal ken bent, president; M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawson, R P Chose, Col K J 
BlWJgT. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrot! Building, 855 Market 
street. San Francisco, Cal. 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 4t8, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the juargest Stock. Our prices are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 




Big Reservoirs. 

The reservoirs being built by 
the Standard and the Union cover 
almost as much ground as a city 
square and are twenty-seven feet 
in depth. They will hold 200,000 
barrels and they look rather big 
but in Beaumont the have them 
five times as large. The Texas 
tanks were excavated when a 
number of wells were yielding 
70,000 barrels a day each, but 
there is no present necessity for 
such gigantic storage equipment 



SraithPremier £ 
Typewriters * 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses to Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Associat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers , 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & M. ALEXANDER S CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 

110 Mont* 'tiery St. San Francisco. 

Branch Stores: 

Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. 



ft ■• 






%■, 



been made in all the - . 

! lands are Adapted to 

1 Landi and are the 

ilation in the United 

■or l.and Book and Circular*. 

Pine proven oil lands to offer. Correspondence 

solicited. KstnhllMied 1885. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 

kindred hydrocarbons 



If You are going Bast call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar top 

Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 
B. o. Mccormick. t. h. goodman, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United States and 

Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane co. 

If. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 



San Francisco, Cal 



W. B. YOULE 




CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil Lands and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Present Address; 

Arbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of tuachin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limU of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
i ecommended for work under rsoo feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 



PACIFIC OIL, REPORTER 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GfIt=Bdged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

6009 ACRES 0000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected. Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, 



Stock Nonassessable. 
= $350,000 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 



American Steel & Wire Co, 

CWM00 HE* YORK WORCESTER DENVER SM FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 
American Steel Wire Pumping Line 



u 



American Steel Wire Tubing Line 
American Steel Wire Sand Line 
Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 



PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 

G TY SALES OFFICE 

8 and 10 Pine Street 

8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GEO. H. ISJH0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. IO 



AGENCIES 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

E. R. ELDREDGE, Sales Agent o. D. COLVIN, Sales Agent 



CHAS. C. M00RE & CO. 

— , t CONTRACTORS FOR 

engineers complete power plants 



Machinery of the Highest Grade 




Geipel Steam Traps 

Always Closed when Steam 

is in the Brass Pipe. Always 

Open when Water is in the 

Brass Pipe. 

Guaranteed Positive in its 

Action. 




Main Office 

San Francisco, Cal, 

32 First Street 



Branch Offices 
NEW YORK 1303 Havemeyer BIdg 
LOS ANGELES 103 S. Broadway 
SEATTLE 218 Second Ave. So 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., DECEMBER 26, 1903. V 



Price 10 Cents. 



OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 

PITT8B URGH, PA. 

MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING REQUIRED 

To Drill, Equip and Operate OIL, GAS and WATER WELLS 
BOILERS, ENGINES, DRILLING and FISHING TOOLS 
MANILA & WIRE ROPE, CASING, TUBING, DRIVE & LINE PIPE 

COMBINATION OUTFITS 

INTERCHANGEABLE FROM STANDARD CABLE DRILLING TO THE 
HYDRAULIC ROTARY SYSTEM, SHIFT MADE IN A FEW MOMENTS 
FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER. 

CABLE SYSTEM FOR HARD ROCK FORMATIONS, HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
FOR QUICKSAND & CLAY, COMBINATION OUTFITS for any condition. 



/ 





IMPERIAL WORKS, Oil City, Pa., one of the OIL WELL SUPPLY CO.'S numeroos Man'f'g Plants. 



THE COLUMBIA STEEL DRILLER. 



THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




BOSTON CASING 



<b> LINE PIPE 



<^> DRIVE PIPE 

<b> TUBING 



As Manufactured by the 



NATIONAL TUBE COflPANY 



For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through' 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 8. 



SAN 1RAN0ISCO, CAL., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1902. 



PRICS, Ti:n V.KNTS. 



THE COALINGA FIELD. 



Both the Standard and the Union to Com- 
mence Big Operations. 



The Standard Has Entered the Field in Earnest and 

Is Erecting a Mammoth Storage Plant to 

Connect With the Big Pipe-Line. 



The oil business is looking up 
in Fresno county, and those with 
holdings in the Coalinga field are 
feeling particularly good. Both 
the Standard Oil company and 
Union Oil company, the rival of 
the Standard, are going into the 
Coalinga field. The Pacific On. 
Reporter stated several weeks 
ago that the Union company was 
seeking to make contracts with 
the Coalinga producers prelimin- 
ary to building a pipe line from 
there to the coast, with the ter- 
minal at Bay Point, and now there 
seems to be little doubt that the 
enterprise will go ahead. It was 
reported last week that the com- 
pany had bought a valuable 
quarter section of land in the 
Coalinga field, as a depot for its 
oil storage tanks, and that the 
company intended to sink a large 
number of wells on the land as 

well. 

Those who were interested in 
the deal, said that they were not 
at liberty to say a word, as the 
negotiations had not yet been 
consummated. They expected, 
however, that in a few days there 
would not be any occasion for 
secrecy. The pipe-line will cost 
about $600,000 when completed to 
the coast. 

The Standard Oil company is 
also going into the Coalinga field, 
in fact has already gone in there. 
The Standard company sent a 
force of men in last week to begin 
work on the foundation for a 36,- 
ooo-barrel tank. The tank has 
been received from Ohio and is of 
steel. It will be located on the 
land of the California Oil Fields 
Limited. The tank will be up 
within the next thirty days, and 
the company will be ready to re- 
ceive oil within ninety days. A 
branch pipe-line will be run from 
there to connect with the line 
from Bakersfield. 

As stated, the oil business is 
looking up, and the producers are 
now receiving 30 cents a barrel 
for oil at the well. The Standard 
Oil company has made a standing 
offer of that amount. The pro- 
ducers are now taking steps to 
market their oils in an intelligent 
business way. A preliminary 
meeting has been held, looking 



toward the establishment of a 
uniform price and a selling 
agency. 

STANDARD REFINERY. 



Work on the Big Plant Post Ap- 
proaching Completion. 

The latest additions to the 
plant are the big oil pumping 
station at the shore end of the 
mole and the factory for refining 
whale-oil, lard-oil and products 
of like nature. The latter build- 
ing is something like 80x160 feet, 



' © © : © a©@©£)® ^Qi5^g0'0 : S'0'0€ 

M 

A GREAT OIL PAPER. I 



On January 3 will appear the New Year's edition 
of the Pacific Oil Reporter, which will be read 
with interest by everyone connected with the oil in- 
dustry. 

The edition will consist of forty-eight pages of 
matter describing every oil field in the State, and giv- 
ing full accounts of the leading oil companies. 

The statistics of the amount of the oil production 
of each district, number of producing wells, number of 
capped wells, and number of wells now being drilled, 
will be given with absolute correctness. 

The edition will be illustrated with over eighty 
half-tone reproductions of photographs recently taken. 
A feature cf this edition will be a number of special 
articles written by gentlemen who are thoroughly 
familiar with the different phases of the oil 'industry 
and of the different oil fields. 

Among these special articles are: 

" Bright Outlook for 1903." Hon. M. H. de Young. 

" California Petroleum as a Chemist's Problem." 
Prof. Edmond O'Neill, State University. 

" Geological Indications of the Presence of Petro- 
leum." A. S. Cooper, Ex-State Mineralogist. 

" California's Oil Industry." Dr. C. T. Deane. 

" Crude Oil In Smelting." A. Von Der Ropp. 

"Testing Fue; Oils." Paul W. Prutzman. 

'.' Kern County Oil Fields." H._G. James. 

" Fullerton Oil Fields." Edgar Johnson. 

" Whittier Oil Fields." W. A. Smith. 

" Los Angeles Oil Fields." Theophile Colville. 

" Careaga Field." Julius Ebell. 

" Santa Paula Field." J. D. McCloskey. 

" Colusa and Glenn Field." W. E. Youle. 

" Summerland and Santa Barbara." C. W. Ayers. 

One of the features of this edition will be large 
maps of the Kern River, McKlttrick, Sunset, Midway, 
and Coalinga oil districts. These maps are brought up 
to date, and show the holdings of every company in 
the fields, together with the producing wells, drilling 
wells, tankage and railroads, existing and proposed. 

Although an unusually large edition will be pub- 
lished, consisting of 25,000 copies, orders for the paper 
have come in so rapidly as to indicate the edition will 
soon be exhausted. Those desiring any large number 
of copies should send in their orders immediately. 

The price of these papers is ten cents each, as 
usual. The postage on these papers is two cents each. 



m 

M 


1 


?;©"■©' 0' 



three Btotiea high, and has cement 
lower floors. 

The pumping plant Is designed 
to raise oil to a cluster of mam- 
moth tanks which have just been 
completed on the hill back of the 
company's offices. These tanks 
are storage reservoirs and when a 
ship comes into the harbor to take 
on a supply of fuel she will take it 
from these by gravitation. 

The work of constructing the 
main storage tanks still continues. 
A half dozen of these are com- 
plete and as many more are to 
build under the existlngcontracts. 

The pipe-line is being pushed 
as rapidly as possible. If not 
completed by the first of the year 
it will be in readiness for opera- 
tions as soon thereafter as money 
and brawn can bring it about. 



Petroleum Trade of China. 

Kerosene oil is an article the 
Import of which is steadily grow- 
ing, and every few years sees a 
new producing country sending 
its oil to compete with the older 
brands. For a long time Ameri- 
can oil enjoyed a monopoly, until 
In 1891 shipments of Russian oil 
commenced, and in i894Sumatran 
oil appeared on the scene. Last 
year Japanese and Borneo oil fig- 
ured in the customs returns for 
the first time, and ere long Burma 
will, it is to be presumed, extend 
its export to China. Shipments 
of oil in bulk, by tank steamers,- 
were started in 1897 °y tne Shell 
company, and the extension of 
this method of transportation to 
almost all the treaty ports of 
China, coupled with the erection 
of tanks on shore, wherein to store 
the oil, has, by facilitating distri- 
bution, greatly increased con- 
sumption. The lowering of prices, 
in consequence of keener com- 
petition, has also had its effeect in 
stimulating sales. American oil 
still heads the list in the matter of 
quantity, and is able to command 
a price some 4d. or 5 d. a case 
higher than that of the other oils, 
but Russian and Sumatran oils are 
not far behind. 

It is somewhat remarkable that 
the import of kerosene oil into 
China should exceed that into 
India, and that in this article, 
alone of all foreign products, the 
Chinese should be found better 
customers than the natives of the 
latter country. In India Russian 
oil has occupied and extended the 
field abandoned by American oil, 
and the Director General of 
Statistics is of opinion that this 
transference means merely a ques- 
tion of relative price.. — British 
Consular Report. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



LIQUID FUEL TESTS. 



Splendid Comparative Showing Made with 
the New Fuel in Naval Tests. 



No Longer Any Question As to the Superiority of Li 
quid Fuel Over All Others— Numerous Ad- 
vantages for Use on Ocean Vessels. 



Further tests of the "Hohen- 
stein" boiler have been conducted 
by the Naval Bureau of Steam 
Engineering, using oil as fuel in- 
stead of coal. These tests were 
commenced last June and are still 
under way at Washington. The 
results of fourteen of these tests 
appear in the report of the bureau 
and show conclusively that the 
effectiveness of the boiler, with 
oil as fuel, is much greater than 
where coal was employed. Never- 
theless, the naval board is in- 
clined to take a-very conservative 
view of the matter, and hesitates 
about recommending the general 
use of fuel oil by the vessels 
of the United States Navy. There 
is no longer any question as to 
the superiority of liquid fuel over 
all others, and it possesses numer- 
ous advantages for use on ocean- 
going vessels of all kinds. And it 
would be just as practical for the 
government to provide fuel oil 
stations for its cruisers in differ- 
ent parts of the world as coaling 
stations. 

The same boiler used by the 
bureau in making the coal tests 
was employed in making the fuel 
oil tests. The fuel oil burner was 
one of the Oil City Boiler Works' 
design, and this burner was used 
during the seven general tests 
that were conducted to show, 
among other things, whether or 
not it would be possible to secure 
greater evaporative efficiency from 
the boiler with oil than was se- 
cured with coal. The oil used 
was from the Beaumont oil field' 
which had been treated to remove 
the sulphur and some of the more 
volatile compounds. The bureau 
declares that the naval problem is 
a complicated one, and that an 
extended series of experiments to 
determine the value of liquid fuel 
for ships of war should be con- 
ducted for at least a year. The 
bureau, of course, devoted its 
energies to the mechanical and 
engineering features of the prob- 
lem, and gave no consideration to 
the question of supply. 

Of the opportunities possessed 
by the board for securing trust- 
worthy and reliable data, the re- 
port states: 

The board considers it but just 
to acknowledge that, through the 
generosity of the Oil City Boiler 
Works, the Bureau of Steam En- 
gineering has had placed at its 
disposal, without cost for rental, 
a thoroughly equipped experi- 



mental plant. The experimental 
boiler is of the Hohenstein design 
and it is the same boiler that was 
used by the Navy Department in 
conducting the extended series of 
tests that were made with coal at 
various rates of combustion. The 
value of the data collected during 
the liquid-fuel experiments can 
only be appreciated in its fullness 
by comparing the various tables 
with those secured during similar 
tests when coal was used as a 
combustible. The appropriation 
of $20,000 that was made by the 
Fifty-seventh Congress for deter- 
mining the value of liquid fuel 
for naval purposes will therefore 
be devoted, in great part, to orig- 
inal investigation and research. 
The board has also had at its dis- 
posal an unexpended balance of 
$7,088.09 from a former appro- 
priation. In view also of the fact 
that everybody now performing 
duty in connection with the ex- 
periments is in the naval service, 
T;he appropriation available repre- 
sents only a portion of the actual 
expense of the experimental work. 
The Bureau of Steam Engineer- 
ing has supplemented the work of 
the board by calling upon officers 
in various parts of the world for 
information upon the subject. 
The board has visited the steam- 
ers J. M. Guffey, Paraguay and 
City of Everett, and has carefully 
observed the particular features of 
each installation. Some of the ex- 
perts of the fuel oil department of 
the Standard Oil company have 
visited the experimental plant and 
given valuable advice along cer- 
tain lines. The board has also 
been placed in possession of the 
extensive correspondence carried 
on by the Bureau of Steam En- 
gineering during the past year 
with experts and manufacturers. 
It can therefore be expected that 
if the tests can continue, valuable 
information will not only be se- 
cured, but it will be possible for 
the navy to render a direct service 
to all who have a professional or 
financial interest in the general 
solution of the liquid-fuel ques- 
tion. 

* * * 

The test of June 27, 1902, having 
been a very severe one, and the 
casing of the boiler having been 
considerably warped, it was 
deemed necessary thoroughly to 
overhaul the plant before com- 
mencing the extended series of 
tests projected. The boiler was 



opened, cleaned and thoroughly 
examined. The baffling bricks 
were renewed where necessary. 
As these bricks were of particular 
shape, some time elapsed before 
new ones could be secured. The 
casing was repaired, and an as- 
bestos lining was put underneath 
the firebricks of the furnace floor. 
All auxiliary machinery about 
the experimental plant was over- 
hauled and put in order. The 
cylindrical and boiler received 
from the navy yard, New York, 
was covered with a non-conduct- 
ing material. The necessary 
platforms for holding the scales 
and tanks for weighing the oil and 
water required for this extra boil- 
er were installed in place. The 
request was also made that several 
warrant machinists and the crew 
of a small naval vessel be detailed 
for duty in connection with the 
tests. 

The evaporative efficiency se- 
cured was very high and the re- 
sults were eminently satisfactory. 
The board calls attention to the 
fact that the experimental boiler 
was designed for actual navy con- 
ditions, and that the limitations 
prescribed by the department as 
to height, weight and floor space 
were of a very severe nature 
There was a large amount of radia- 
tion from the boiler, and the pro- 
portion of heating to grate surface 
was nor as great as in land boilers. 



A large amount of valuable infor- 
mation has already been obtained 
from these tests, which has been 
carefully tabulated and is publish- 
ed in the report. The report de- 



CALIFORNIA 
LIMITED 



to CHICAGO, Daily 



Santa Fe 

% W 



An ideal train 

for those 

who seek the 

best. 



SANTA FE TRAINS 

I/eave Market-Street Ferry Depot. 



L/v.S.Fran. 

At. St'kton 

" Merced 

" Fresno. 


Daily 
Local 


Daily 
Lim'td 


Local 
Daily 


Overl'd 
Daily 


8:00 a 
11:10 a 
1:20 p 
3:20 p 


9:30 a 
12:08 p 
1:40 p 
3:00 p 


4:20 p 
7:30 P 


S:oo p 
11:15 p 
K2S p 
3:15 a 


" Hatiford 
" Visalia. 


5:00 p 
4:48 p 


3:51 P 




7:50 a 
5:00 a 


" B'Ufield 
" Kan. C. 
" Chicago 


7:10 p 


5:50 P 
2:31 p 
2:15 p 




7:35 a 
8:02 a 
8:47 P 



a for morning; p for afternoon. 

8: a. m. Daily is Bakersfield Local, stopping at 
all points in San Joaquin valley. Corresponding 
train arrives at 7:50 a. m. daily. 

g:3oa. m. Daily is the "CALIFORNIA LIM- 
ITED," carrying Palace Sleeping Cars and Din- 
ing Cars through to Chicago. Chair Car runs to 
Bakersfield for accommodation of lccal first-class 
passengers. No second-class tickets are honored 
on this train. Corresponding train arrives at 11:10 
p. m, daily. 

4:20 p. m. is Stockton local. Corresponding 
train arrives at 1 r : 10 a . m. daily. 

8:00 p. m. is the Overland Express, with through 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers, and free Reclining 
Chair Cars to Chicago; also Palace Sleeper, which 
cuts out at Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
at 6:00 p. m. daily. * 

Offices— 641 Market Street and in Ferrv Depot, 
San Francisco; 1112 Broadway, Oakland. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7^6-in., 5^-in. and 
4j4-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6 in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTS R 



clares that the following points 
have been clearly established. 

(a) That oil can be burned in a 
very uniform manner. 

(b) That the evaporative effici- 
ency of nearly every kind of oil 
per pound of combustible is proba- 
bly the same. While the crude 
oil may be rich in hydrocarbons, 
it also contains sulphur, so that, 
after refining, the distilled oil has 
probably the same calorific value 
as the crude product. 

(c) That a marine steam gen- 
erator can be forced to even as 
high a degree with oil as with 
coal. 

(d) That up to the present time 
no ill effects have been shown 
npon the boiler. 

(e) That the firemen are dis- 
posed to favor oil, and therefore 
no impediment will be met in this 
respect. 

(I) That the air requisite for 
combustion should be heated If 
possible before entering the fur- 



nace. Such action undoubtedly ! 
ta the gasification of the oil 
product 

(g) That the oil should be heat- 
ed so that it could be atomi/ed 
more readily. 

It is the opinion of the board 
that the information and data al- 
ready at hand warrants the imme- 
diate installation of oil fuel appli- 
ances on two torpedo boats and 
two torpedo boat destroyers to test 
the adaptability for use with water 
tube boilers of bent tube type. 
The installation should be of dif- 
ferent types and effected on boats 
of similar character so that an 
earnest and friendly rivalry may 
be created among the crews to see 
which could obtain the best re- 
sults. Few of the bent tube type 
of boilers now in use on the tor- 
pedo boats are adapted to luiru 
fuel oil effectively, and different 
furnaces will have to be intro- 
duced in order to direct the pro- 
ducts of combustion among the 
tubes. 



s 



Alaska Mosquito Head Net 

A Perfect Protection Against Insect Pests 




Adopted by the United States 
Government as the Standard for 
use in the army. 

Over 150,000 of these nets sent to 
the Philippines. 

Invented for and in general use 
in mosquito-infested Alaska. 

Folds up compactly and goes 
easily into the pocket. 

Made of specially prepared gal- 
vanized steel wire and the finest 
and strongest netting. 

Invaluable for hunters, campers 
and travelers. 

Can be worn day or night with- 
out inconvenience. 



Made in Two Varieties. 

No. 1. Made of finest netting, sure protection against mosquitos. 50 cents. 
No. 1. Made of very fine, but strong, imported lace, for midges and black 
flies, fi.oo. 

If your dealer does not handle them, write direct 
to the manufacturer and we will mail on receipt of 
price. 

ALASKA MOSQUITO HEAD NET CO. 

Factory, 1927 Haste St., BERKBLEY, CAL. 



Oil for Locomotives. Valley, in Southern Alberta, 
The Minneapolis Times declares Canada. Daring an attempt I 
that it would not be a matter of tract the tools, which had become 
surprise if within the space of ten '<»« in the well, the oil overflow- 
years every railroad train west of «1, rising two feet above the sur- 
the Mississippi should be pro- face. The How continues at inter- 
pelled by fuel furnished by the »als of about every two hours, 
oil fields of Texas and California. Kvery vessel about the camp was 
The prediction looks reasonable filled, and many barrels overflowed 
when it is considered that oil has into the creek and were lost. 
been used with success for some 
years by the Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe railway companies in 
southern California. The great " 
obstacle has been the uncertainty £5&fZ ^J2££& 

aS to the SUDDlv Of Oil With tlmt , " l , rilo,, »;e"°"'°''>>- "I November looMhe aev- 

tus an >>>,,; ui uii. wim mat eml amonnU eel opposite the nainea ,,i the rc- 
doubt removed by the develop " 
ment of the Texas fields we may 
expect petroleum to come into 
general use in the West as steam- 
making fuel very rapidly. 

In Canada. 

Oil has been struck in the Line- 
ham well, situated in the Fathead 



OKI WQI iv l MM NOTICB. 

I ■ OMA PRIBTA I: a COMPANY 

islness s«n Prancljco. 



pective slockli 

Ceo. J. Bucknall 

Bill C. Culver, KiTi 

'fane , 

Jas. V Mollll i 



1*5 eo 
50 oo 
S oo 
ro oo 
>o oo 



- nil Inw, nu<! mi nriler of the 
til day nl Nov. 

) x)?. so many lol men. 

stock as may be oeceaaary will be 
auction ;it Ui, once ol Madison & Hurkc jo 

Montgomery St., Snn fran 

aent assessment, together with the costs 
ol advertisiuy and expenses ol siik- 
By order ot the Hoard ol Directors. 
FRANK MORTON. Secretary. 



MAPS OF THE OIL FIELDS 



Showing all of the Companies, Wells, Tanks, 
Etc., in the Kern River, Sunset, Midway, McKit- 
trick and Coalinga Fields. 

These Maps are brought up to date and are ab- 
solutely corrert. They are the only maps that 
show the condition of these fields as they exist 
to-day. 

These maps are Copyrighted by the publishers, 
Barlow & Hill, and can only be used by them and 
their authorized agent in San Francisco, Tub 
Pacific Oii, Reporter. 

PRICE LIST OF MAPS. 

Large Blue Prints, 25x25, single map . $1.50 
Large Blue Prints, 25x25, per doz. . . 15.00 

Small Maps, single map 25 

Small Maps, per doz 1.50 

Small Maps, per IOO 10.00 

Small Maps, per 1,000 30.00 

Small Maps, each additional 100 . . . 15.00 

Maps in colors, printed to order, showing in red 
the holdings of any particular company. Folders 
and Prospectuses printed giving maps and show- 
ing location of company's property, with proper 
descriptive matter. 

The above can be obtained ONLY from 

Barlow & Hill 

1501 19th St., Bakersfield 

or the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco, Cal. 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



F I T L E R' 8 1 Oil Well Supply Co/s 



DRILLING 

CABLES 



a* 

VtV 

m 
m 



Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners' Association 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS 



One Year $250 

Six Months 1 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies j 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVA.NCB 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Regi stered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31.3a.33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



The actual construction of the line 
will depend very largely on the 
Coalinga operators themselves. If 
they can produce enough oil to 
warrant the construction of such 
a line the Union will build it, and 
it will pass through the Fresno- 
San Benito district, where about 
twenty companies have expended 
collectively nearly if not quite 
half a million dollars in the vain 
attempt to find oil, and not a sin- 
gle company has yet gone down 
deep enough to test the territory. 
Great things are in store for the 
Coalinga field, which ought to 
rank as one of the best oil fields 
in the State. 



No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal. 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY.. DECEMBER 26, 1902 



The importance of the Coalinga 
oil field is 
An Increasingly not generally 
Important Field appreciated 
as it should 
be. Its possibilities are not un- 
derstood. 

While the field is known chiefly 
on account of the product of the 
Home Oil company and its near 
neighbors its real importance lies 
in the territory just outside that 
Included in the holdings of these 
companies. The Home produces 
an oil valuable on account of its 
peculiar properties for use in gas 
making. This oil is supposed to 
be worth in the neighborhood of 
65 and 70 cents at the wells. The 
area producing this especial qual- 
ity of oil is very limited. 

The most of the territory in- 
cluded in the Coalinga district 
proper produces a different or 
rather different grades of oil, for 
there are several distinct kinds of 
oil found in this district in an area 
of less than fifteen miles square. 

The California Oil Fields, 
Limited, an English corporation, 
has done much to develop the 
possibilities of this field, a d 
the dozen wells it has drilled has 
demonstrated the presence of both 
fuel and refining oil in abundant 
quantities, so abundant and of 
such a quality as to warrant the 
Standard to commence the erec- 
tion of a great storage plant in the 
Coalinga field. This means, also, 
the building a branch pipe-line 
from this storage plant to the big 
pipe-line now being finished from 
Bakersfield to Point Richmond. 
This branch line will be about 
twenty miles in length. 

In addition to the Standard the 
Union Oil company has also in 
view some large operations in the 
Coalinga field which may ultimate- 
ly resulti n a pipe-line to the coast. 



Standard Oil Dividends. 

During November the directors 
of the Standard Oil company de- 
clared a quarterly dividend of $10 
a share, or $9,750,000 on the out- 
standing capital stock of $79,500,- 
000. This is the fourth quarterly 
payment, making a dividend of 



of the stock, as reported, he has 
received in dividends during the 
last three years 1 lose to $46,000,- 
000. 

It was explained today that not- 
withstanding the dividends de- 
clared during the current year 
were below disbursements during 
1900 and 1901, the earnings dur- 
ing 1902 surpass all previous 
years. It was due largely to the 
great outlay of money in connec- 
tion with additions, improvements, 
the acquisition of new territory, 
etc., that prevented the mainten- 
ance of the $48 a share rate. 

For example, the company has 
under construction a large fleet of 
vessels for transporting Texas oil. 
It has spent millions in prospect- 
ing in Texas, Tennessee, Ken- 
tucky, California and other states. 
According to an official the Stan- 
dard Oil company carries no sur- 
plus, giving the stockholders full 
benefits in the way of earnings. 

The advance of oil has added 



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OUR NEW YEAR'S EDITION. 



The annual New Year's edition of the Pacific Oil 
Reporter will be published January 3rd. 

This edition will be noteworthy among oil publi- 
cations which have heretofore appeared, not only on 
account of Its beautiful appearance, but more espe- 
cially on account of its contents. 

It will contain a number of special articles from 
those prominent as scientists, geologists, practical 
drillers, and successful oil men generally. 

It will cover every oil district in the State. 

It will be beautifully illustrated with half tone re- 
productions. 

It will contain statistical information that will be 
exact and reliable. 



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$45 a share, or $43,875,000 for the 
year. For the first quarter a divi- 
dend of $zo a share was declared; 
for the second quarter, $10 a 
share; for the third quarter, $5 a 
share, and for the last, or present 
quarter, $10 a share. 

The aggregate disbursements of 
the Standard Oil company for the 
current year are less by $3 a share 
than in the preceeding year, when 
$46,800,800 was paid to share- 
holders. Forty-eight percent was 
also paid during 1900. 

Within the last three years the 
Standard Oil company has paid to 
stockholders in the neighborhood 
of $140,000,000. In this connection 
it may be said that aside from the 
United States Steel corporation 
the Standard Oil company dis- 
burses more money in dividends 
than any other corporation in the 
world. 

Little information can be ob- 
tained as to the amount of Stan- 
dard Oil stock held by John D. 
Rockefeller. If he holds one-third ' 



millions to the earnings of the 
company, and for this reason the 
dividend disbursements during 
1903, 1904 and 1905 will be in ex- 
cess of those for 1900, 1901 and 
1902. The dividends declared by 
the Standard Oil company by 
years since 1892 follow: 1892, 
1893, 1894 and 1895, 12 percent; 
1896, 31 per cent; 1897, 1898, 30 
per cent; 1899, 33 percent; 1900 
and 1901, 48 per cent; 1902, 45 
percent. 



Petroleum as Fuel. 

In a recent lecture before the 
chamber of commerce of Utica, N. 
Y., on "Oil as Fuel," colonel W. J. 
B. Patterson said in part: 

"As a steam producer fuel oil 
has no rival, and the demand for 
that purpose in Russia is constant- 
ly on the increase. According to 
government report, the demand for 
fuel oil has increased 900 percent 
in six years, and if the supply was 
doubled it would now be absorbed 
by the home demand. Nothing 



else is burned on the railways of 
Central Asia, the Caucasus, south- 
ern Russia, the Caspian sea and 
the Volga river. It is used very 
largely in the industrial works 
throughout Russia, and it is also 
beginning to be used by the Med- 
iterranean steamers, and those in 
the East India and China trade, 
and its increased use is only Unl- 
imited by an adequate supply at a 
reasonable price. In this connec- 
tion it is of special interest to note 
that, according to consular report, 
the increased demand has caused 
the price of fuel oil at Baku to 
rise from an average of 35^ cents 
per barrel in 1897 to 60 cents in 
1898 and 87^ cents in 1899. 

The Russian oil producers have 
to contend not only with a most 
disadvantageous location as re- 
gards the export trade and an ex- 
ceedingly high cost of develop- 
ment, but also with a government 
royalty that in recent years has 
reached as high as 46 cents per 
barrel. The government royalty 
was originally two cents per bar- 
rel, but this has been gradually in- 
creased until a maximum of the 
above figures has been reached, 
the average royalty on recent 
leases probably being about one- 
half that amount. As the price of 
crude oil at the well averages 
about 75 cents per barrel, it would 
seem as if the production of oil 
under all these disadvantages 
would not be profitable, but such 
is not the case. Notwithstanding 
these great disadvantages, the 
operations are carried on with 
great profit, and the companies 
engaged in the business piy large 
dividends, their stocks sell at high 
prices and are in great demand. 
Oil is fast becoming practical for all 
but a very few of the uses in which 
coal has hitherto been considered 
indispensable. It is successful in 
locomotives, meets all the condi- 
tions of steam generation in sta- 
tionary boilers, has lately carried 
a steamship across the Pacific, is 
available in many metallurgical 
uses, and if an advantage should 
appear from so doing it can be 
very well used to the exclusion of 
coal as a domestic fuel. The 
change of appliances necessary for 
the substitution of oil for coal is 
neither costly nor difficult. Such 
substitution has already taken 
place where oil is cheaper than 
coal; and its great convenience 
and the economy in handling, to- 
gether with the absence of ash, 
will gradually extend its area of 
consumption into districts where 
it will successfully meet the com- 
petition of coal even with little if 
any advantage in a lower first 
cost. 



Oil for Danish Steamers. 

The East Asiatic company, of 
Copenhagen, Denmark, is having 
oil tanks erected in the free har- 
bor at that port, to provide a stock 
of liquid fuel not only for its own 
steamers, but for those of other 
owners. 



IPIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL STOCK VALUATION. 

Figures Indicate the Public'* 
Dldcriminu tlon. 

On what do the investing pub- 
lic base their opinions regarding 
the true value ol oil stocks 
course, it is reasonable to a*>ume 
that money is invested upon the 
present earning capacity of a com- 
pany and its intrinsic possibilities. 
A careful buyer would naturally 
look to those two features when 
putting his money into an organi- 
zation and any other reason for 
purchasing slocks must come un- 
der some other head than " com- 
parative conservatism." That rea- 
sons other than the two above 
given enter into stock deals is 
well illustrated by four companies 
located in the Kern River field— 
the Imperial, Thirty-three, West 
Shore and Peerless. They are 
equally well situated as far as the 
knowledge developed by drills 
goes; they produce the same qual- 
ity of oil, and they are among the 
best in the entire district. While 
the amounts of land possessed by 
each vary, all are divided into the 
same number of shares, 100,000. 
By use of an arbitrary proportion, 
the respective incomes may be 
represented: 

Imperial 2S 

Thirty-three 14 

West Shore 7 

Peerless ro 

The lands owned bear the fol 
lowing relations: 



Imperial 

Thirty-three. 

Peerless 



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The prices at which the stock of 
each sells upon the boards are: 
Imperial 

Thirty-three .. 8 

Peerless ...... rj 

Many comparisons can be made 



the Peerless, has three times as 
much land, but its stock is worth 
in the eyes of speculators less than 
a quarter more. 

The Peerless has an i come 
about one-half gre.iter than the 
West Shore, has twice as much 
land, and its stock goes for more 
than four times as much. 

The Thirty-three earns a third 



PUMPING PLANT. 



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Do you want to sell oil well machinery and sup- 
plies? 

Have you oil land to sell? 

Do you want to buy oil land? 

Do you want to sell the stocks of a first class oil 
company? 

If you do then send in your advertisement for the 
New Year's edition of the Pacific On, Reporter. 

An edition of 25,000 copies will be printed, ele- 
gantly illustrated. 

Advertisements must be sent by December 29th. 



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regarding the actual worth of those 
stocks and their selling value, 
such, for instance, as that: 

The Imperial is paying twice as 
much in dividends as the Thirty- 
three, has three times as much 
land, yet its shares are selling for 
only twice as much money. 

The Imperial is yielding nearly 
three times as much money as 



more money than the Peerless; it 
has an equal amount of land, but 
its shares are valued in the pro- 
portion of 8 to 13. — Bakersfield 
Californian. 



William Halbert has sold a 30- 
acre lease, one mile west of Find- 
lay, Ohio, to the Risser Oil com- 
pany for $24,000. 



OH l« tided In Irrigation 
Near Mmlcra. 

A I.. Sayre has just purchased 
a 54-borse-power crude oil engine 
for a pumping plant which he will 
install on his ranch near town. 
The engine is the largest in use 
for the purpose in this valley. 
An 8 inch pump has been put In, 
which has a capacity of pumping 
2,000 gallons of water a minute, 
and there are six wells, one of 
which alone has been tested and 
will furnish enough water for irri- 
gating a large body of land. Mr. 
Sayre has 480 acres of land, some 
of which is in vineyard and some 
in alfalfa, which he intends to ir- 
rigate. 

The intelligent farmers of this 
section are rapidly settling the ir- 
rigation question by the inaugura- 
tion of pumping plants, and it 
will not be a long time before ev- 
ery idle acre of land in this vici- 
nity will be yielding bountiful 
crops. — Madera Mercury. 



A recent dispatch from Chicago 
says: " 'Ashek, the Oppressor," 
the latest book of Mrs. Gertrude 
Potter Daniels, which has been 
taken off sale until its attacks on 
trusts have toned down, depicts in 
the main the struggle between the 
Standard Oil company and the in- 
dependent well owners. 

Subscribe for the Pacific On. 
Reporter. 



INVESTIGATION EM INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Kern County, Cal., situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present operations is in famous Section 2, Township n, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Weil No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 cents A SHARE 



WILL LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that you act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value $1.00) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment. We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member alifornia Petroleum Miners'Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and Postoffice Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

ELK HORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 



470-471-472 Parrott Building 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE FIRST SHIPMENT. 



A Cargo of Santa Barbara Oil 
Sent to the Islands. 

The first big shipment of oil 
from the Western Union Oil wells, 
which are located on the Careaga 
rancho, in the upper Los Alamos 
Valley, is now being loaded on one 
of the big oil ships of the Pacific 
Oil and Navigation company at 
Alcatraz landing, near Gaviota. 
The vessel is under contract to 
carry 16,000 barrels of the local 
product to Honolulu, and was 
ready to sail last Wednesday for 
the island. 

The oil is being pumped into 
the great oil tanks of the ship 
through the pipe-line direct from 
the wells, a distance of forty miles. 
Considerable oil has been carried 
in this way from the wells to the 
refinery at Alcatraz during the 
pa't month, but this is the first to 
be pumped direct to the vessel at 
the wharf. The oil is 23 gravity, 
and is as good as any produced in 
the State for either fuel or refin- 
ing purposes. 

Mr. Slauson, of Los Angeles, 
and one of the directors of the 
Western Union company, was 
seen, and said it was true that the 
Pacific Oil and Navigation com- 
pany, which owns the refinery 
and wharf at Alcatraz, and also 
the pipe-li'ie from the sea to the 
wells, had an option on the prop- 
erty, but that it extended for sev- 1 



eral months yet. He stated that 
he thought the property was as 
good as sold, as the Navigation 
company had many large contracts 
for transporting oil to the Ha- 
waiian and Philippine Islands, 
and were anxious to have their 
own field. 

The Western Union is rapidly 
developing its property, regard- 
less of the fact that it may change 
hands within the next few weeks. 



of nine tons each up a 6.3 percent 
grade at an average speed of from 
five to six miles an hour, with the 
same amount of fuel that was pre- 
viously required for two engines 
in doing the same work. It is an 
oil-burner, and has a tank carry- 
ing a supply sufficient for a round 
trip of 102- miles. 

J. A. Naugle, general manager 
of the Sonora Railroad of Mex- 
ico says that his road will begin 



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To Newsdealers. 



Newsdealers should order in advance a large 
number of extra copies of the New Year's Edition of 
the Pacific Oil Reporter. 

There will be a big demand. 

They willibe sold at 10 cents, as usual. 



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Three new wells are expected to 
come in at any time. — Santa 
Barbara Independent. 



Rock Island Taking to OH. 

The Rock Island Railroad com- 
pany has in operation on its El 
Paso Division an engine built by 
the Lima Locomotive and Machine 
company, of Lima, Ohio, that 
weighs 280,000 pounds, hauls a 
train of twenty-seven loaded cars 



the use of fuel oil for its engines 
as soon as the tariff is reduced 
sufficiently to allow them to im- 
port it from the United States at a 
profit. 

The trans-Pacific Oceanic steam- 
ship lines, whose western port is 
Seattle, and which are shortly to 
begin the use of oil as fuel, will 
obtain their American side supply 
from Kern county and their Asia- 
tic supply from the Baku fields, 
Russia. 



Railroad Oil Tanks. 

The Southern Pacific company's 
15,000-barrel oil tank at Mojave is 
now about completed, and work on 
the three 55,000-barrel oil tanks at 
Olig is being rushed, one being 
nearly completed. These tanks 
are in addition to the one built 
during the past summer. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that buys the oil and pays $1.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes THE hiGhbsT.GRADB gaso- 
line, benzine and kerosene oj? any refinery on The pacific coast. 


Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three. Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates 900,000 shares. * 
We act as trustee foi this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will betaken up and the pooled 
stock of the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus if three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
payer the investment would still yield 12^ percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 


$89 buys 100 Shares in each of lour companies, or 
400 shares full-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment. 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
33T percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 450 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
i goo, 000 shares held in trust by us. 


THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELDS. One com- 
pany is pumping 52° gravity oil, selling it at f 1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1, 150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well ; third company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset, 
and land holdings, drilling rig, and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 




INDEX. 


The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

. ' There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52° Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade forilluminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity that has ever come to this State slip into comparitively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because they did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
any speculative venture, but in actually proven lands, which can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $5,000 per acre, and which in a few 

i years will be worth five times that price." 


























Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 


THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL OIL PROPOSITION : 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade oil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 


Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC OIL RHPORTBR 



_3L 



BEAUMOINT OIL. 

The Market Price i» Steadily 
Advancing. 
One result ol the rapidly in- 
creasing Uastern demand for 
Texas oil combined with the fact 
of the rapidly lessening productive 
power of the Beaumont field is 
that the price of the oil is rapidly 
advancing as the following, from 
the Beaumont Enterprise of Dec- 
ember ioth, clearly states: 

The price of oil continues to 
climb upward, and while the up- 
ward tendency is not character- 
ised by spasms it is going up 
nevertheless. The prices that 
prevailed yesterday, and which 
are in force to-day, are as follows: 

Oil in tanks in small (quantities 42c. 

Oil f. o. b. Gladys or Beaumont, in 

carload lots 55c. 

Oil in tanks in 50,000 or 100,000 bar- 
rel lots So to 25 c. 

The above quotations are abso- 
lutely correct, and if any oil 
holder or producer has disposed 
of any quantity of oil for less than 
the figures quoted during this or 
the latter part of the last week, 
he has simply sold the commodity 
for less than the market price. In 
evidence of this fact the Enter- 
prise is enabled to quote actual 
sales made by reliable parties 
yesterday. Mr. G. B. Mackey, 
formerly cashier for the J. M. 
Guffey company, disposed of 
twenty cars yesterday at 55 cents 
per barrel, and closed a contract 
for the delivery of 200,000 barrels 
at 60 cents per barrel. There is 
nothing particularly strange about 
these prices; oil is advancing 
steadily all over the country, and 
it is reasonably evident that the 
price of the Beaumont product is 
going to go even higher. The 
contract Mr. Mackey has for the 
delivery of 200,000 barrels at 60 
cents is f. o. b. Port Arthur. 



Drilling In England. 

American enterprise has taken 
England by storm. It has com- 
menced the vigorous development 
of natural gas fields around Lon- 
don, which are said to be larger 
but deeper than those known to 
exist in the United States. These 
fields were first tapped six years 
ago at Hatfield, in Sussex, when 
railroad men were boring deep for 
water. When they were down 
312 feet the smell of gas was pow- 
erful. They disregarded it and 
thought it was foul air. Even la- 
ter, when a light was applied to 
the boring, and brought a huge 
burst of flame, nothing practical 
was done beyond illuminating the 
adjoining depot. 

But a year ago some Americans 
began exploration in real earnest. 
They find that coal oil in abun- 
dance underlies the sandstone for- 
mation which covers a great part 
of England. They formed a pow- 
erful company, which is carrying 
on its operations night and day, 
and several wells are in full flow. 
The gas supplies both light and 



power. In the deepest hole the 
pressure is 200 feet to the square 
inch, which is more than the work- 
ing pressure of most locomotives 
in this country. This pressure is 
found to rise steadily as the holes 
pierce deeper into the beds of por- 
ous sandstone that cover the gas- 
bearing strata beneath. The Amer- 
icans took their own time to ac- 
quire all available property, and 
paid a high price for most of It. — 
Exchange. 



Trouble In Bemimnnt. 

The following from the Beau- 
mont Enterprise would indicate 
trouble among the operators in 
that oil camp: 

A crowd of oil men got together 
in the lobby of the Crosby hotel 
last night, and each agreed that a 
petition should be circulated ask- 
ing each and every oil producer to 
sign an agreement to come togeth- 
er in a public meeting some time 
real soon for the purpose of en- 
gaging in "heart to-heart talks" 
for the good of themselves. The 
producers who are agitating this 
move think probably they under- 
stand certain phases of the situa- 
tion that some of their fellow-pro- 
ducers do not understand, and vice 
versa, and have come to the con- 
clusion that the best way to Inter- 
change ideas is to come together 
in a meeting. 



Crude oil born< . er. Visalin, 

C«l.; n 

Casing head, P. J. Moser, Kauc 

Hydrocarbon luirner, Walter Mai 
Newport, K 

Well drill, P. H. ItjotlR- and I- - . I. 
Woods, Collins. M . 1.771. 

Pithing tool, II. A. Worthington, Lea 
Aagelea, Cat; No. 711,989. 

Crude Oil burner, T. O. Ilatcinan and 
H. T. Wilson, Tort Worth, Tex.. No. 

714.995- 

Steam explosive engine, C. A. liraden, 
Dutler, I'a., assignor to the nraden Gas 
Bogine Company, same place; No. 715.- 

008. 
OH burner, las. Fisher, New Orleans, 

1 a. ; No. 715,044. 

Process of shutting off water in drilled 
wells, Win. Hutts, Whittier, Cal.; No. 
715. I4T. 

Oil burner, G. F. Robertson, Beau- 
mont, Texas; No. 715,151. 

Oil burner, F. N. Wilcox, New Or- 
leans, La.; No. 715,227. 



Oil and Gas Patents. 

The following recently granted 
patents relating to oil and gas are 
reported expressly for the Paci- 
fic Oii, Reporter by J. M. Nes- 
bit, patent attorney, Park build- 
ing, Pittsburg, Pa., from whom 
printed copies may' be procured 
for 15 cents each: 

Centering and guiding device for 
deep-boring apparatus with eccentric 
boring tool, John Wyczyski, Truskarviec, 
Austria; No. 712,887. 

Bit, E. A. Cowles, Franklin, Pa.; No. 
713,067. 

Rod and tube elevating aud pumping 
apparatus. W. J. Wright, Pittsburg; No. 
713,269. 

Oil burner, W. E- Chandler, Elcampo, 
Texas; No. 713,397. 

Crude oil burner, L. S. Flatau, St. 
Louis, Mo.; No. 713,419. 

Process of refining asphaltic mineral 
oils, J. C. Minis, New Orleans, La.: No. 

713 475- 

Well tube lifter, Joseph Neumeier, La 
Crosse, Wis.; No 713,485. 

Hydrocarbou burner, F. A. Reynolds, 
Lewiston, Me., assignor to Standard 
Power company, of New York; No. 713,- 

494- 

Hydrocarbon buruer, H. R. Searing, 
Bayonne, N. J.; No. 713,697. 

Protector for pumping rods, T. R. 
Vinzent, Berkeley, Cal.; assignor to W. 
G. Leale, Manufacturing and Develop- 
ing company, San Francisco: No. 713,- 

738. 

Rope or cable clamp, J. B. Braden, 
Salem, W. Va.; No. 713.738. 

Hydrocarbon burner, J. H. Morrissey, 
San Francisco; No. 713.902. 

Well drilling machine, R. B. Moore, 
Yamelton, Texas; No. 714, 11 r. 

Device for preventing gas or oil wells 
from gushing, G. R. Cheesman, Au- 
burn, N. Y.; No. 714, 146. 

Oil burner, L. A. Pfeiffer aud L. D. 
Staples, San Francisco; No. 714,394. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds underwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 



Oil Men. 
We can give you POSITrVH in- 
PORMATIOM as to whether OIL 
under your and, and point 
out tbi here your 

well will be a PRODUCES., also the 
depth you will have to sink. 
Save money by consulting US. 
Newman & Robinson, Room 6, 
No. 36 Geary Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cala. 



The Union Oil company, of Can- 
ada, according to a statement of 
its secretary, now lias 90 wells in 
operation in Ontario, between l'e- 
trolea and Sarnia. 



IN Till iR COIRTOF Till'. CITY 

AND COUNTS OH SAN i 

state op California. 

In the matter of the Hstate of Mary T. P. Ftynn, 

deceased. 

Ming and filing of the verified pe- 
tition ol Hugh I Ivnii Administrator of the Estate 
of Mary T. p. Hlynii, deceased: it 1 
dered that all persons interested iu the estate of 
Mary T. P. Flyun, deceased, be and they are 
hereby required to be and appear in the Su- 
perior Court of the City aud County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California in the Courtroom of 
said Court department 9 thereof in the City Hall 
of said Citv and County oil the 19th day of Janu- 
ary 1903 at to o'clock .\ m. of that day to show 
cause, if any they have why the realty belonging 
to said estate aud hereinafter described should 
DOt be mortgaged for the sum of twenty-seven 
huudied dollars or such lesser amount as to the 
Court shall seem meet; reference to said petition 
is hereby made for further particulars. 

The realty referred to is described as follows: 
Commencing at a point on the Southeasterly line 
of Minna street, distant thereon 368 feet Q inches 
southwesterly from the southwesterly line of 
Fourth street, thence southwesterly along said 
line of Minna street 23 feet q inches, thence at 
right angles southeasterly 80 feet thence at 
right angles Northeasterly 23 feet 9 inches 
thence at right angles northwesterly 80 feet to 
the point of commencement, aud being a portion 
of 100 Vara lot No. 133, in said City and County 
of San Francisco. 

It is further ordered that notice of this order 
be given by the publication thereof for four suc- 
cessive weeks, at least once a week before the 
time appointed for said hearing in the Pacific 
Oil Reporter, a newspaper published in said 
City and County. J. V. COFFBY, Judge. 

Dated December 17th, 1902. 



A BONANZA 
INVESTMENT 



The Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refin- 
ing Company, 

of California, has the largest and most valuable deposit 
of LIQUID ASPHALT yet discovered in this country ; 
has its own REFINERY of over 400 barrels daily ca- 
pacity, which was started up on November 1st, and as 
the asphalt produced contains several by-products of 
great commercial value, the company should be able to 
earn and pay very heavy dividends, in fact, so large as 
to warrant the stock advancing to par in the next few 
weeks, and probably to several hundred per cent pre- 
mium by the first of the new year. The stock is now 
selling at only 4% CENTS PER SHARE (#45 per thou- 
sand) which is just 45 cents on the dollar, and the 
FIRST QUARTERLY DIVIDEND HAS BEEN 
PROMISED FOR JANUARY 1ST. Invest now and 
have your stock share in the first dividend. Write or 
call at once for reports, photographs of the refinery aud 
the fullest information. 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 



2 K1LBY ST., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



10 

Another Tank Ship. 

The latest addition to the Pure 
Oil Company's growing fleet is 
the tank steamship Pennoil, 
launched November 18, 1902, at 
Greenock, Scotland. The fleet 
now includes two ocean - going 
tank steamers, the Pureoil and 
Pennoil; two ocean-going barges, 
the Marcus Hook and J. W. Lee ; 
three 8,003 barrel barges on the 
Rhine ; one 10,000 barrel ocean 
lighter and three barges on the 
Elbe. Other vessels for the fleet 
are in process of construction. 
The Pure Oil company is repre- 
sentative of the alliance of inde- 
pendent interests embraced in the 
Producers' Oil company, limited, 
the Producers' and Refiners Oil 
company, limited, and the United 
States Pipe Line company, to- 
gether with oil men who have 
come in through direct investment 
iu the stock of the Pure Oil com- 
pany instead of transition through 
the other companies named. 
When the Pure Oil company was 
started it met with the usual chief 
handicap encountered in inde- 
pendent movements. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter Is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 24: 

CLAIRMONT. 

240 at 15 36 00 

FOUR. 

100 at 60 60 00 

300 at 59 ; 17700 

■HANFORD. 

1 at 94 50 94 50 

1 at 95 00 95 00 

HOME OIL,. 

700 at 310 2, 170 60 

100 at 305 305 00 

100 at 315 3150" 

IMPERIAL. 
100 at 16 00 1,600 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

1,000 at 07 ( B 30) . . 7000 

1,000 at 07 (B 90) 70 00 

i.ooo at 06 (S 90) 6000 

1,000 at 06 60 00 

JUNCTION. 

800 at 09 72 00 

300 at 10 30 00 

KERN. 

50 at 3 90 195 00 

150 at 4 00 600 00 

KERN RIVER OIL. 

10 at 825 8250 

LION. 

500 at 07 35 00 

250 at 06 15 00 

MONARCH. 

700 at 19 13300 

MONTE CRISTO. 
100 at 1 32^ 13250 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 
1, 100 at 13 14300 

PEERLESS. 

35 at I2j£ 312 50 

SOVEREIGN. 

600 at 26 156 00 

STERLING. 

1,100 at 165 1,81500 

300 at 1 67 Ji (B 30)..- 50250 

THIRTY-THREE. 

30 at 7 87 J£ 336 25 

100 at 7 75 775 00 

WOLVERINE. 
200 at 50 100 00 

11,957 Shares Amount $10,547 75 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money I,oaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. X,. CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. BWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO,. CAL. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building. Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Building, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: Califjrnia Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company. S. F. 



Paul ff . Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT& LUBRICATING OILS 



Tei Mint 2791 San Francisco 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it. 
Write J. D. Johnston, 
Newport, R. I. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



PEERLESS OIL COMPANY— ON DECEM- 
ber 1st declared a dividend No. 9, of ten (ro) 
cents per share, payable January r, 1903. Books 
close December 26, 1902. 

The address of stockholder W. I. Taze is desired. 
GURDON BRADLEY, Assistant Secretary. 



GOLD! 



Always at Par. 



Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owns rich gold properties in Arizona; 
active work now in progress, to continue 
which stock is being sold at 



10 



CENTS 
A 

SHARF Absolutely 

olmnL Non-Assessable. 



Par Value $1.00 
Full Paid, 



When present block has been subscribed 
price will be advanced to 20 cents per 
share. Send for particulais. Bank ref- 
erence. 
W. J. Young & Co., Fiscal Agents, 
628-630 Laughlin Building, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



SOME MEN PAY 

$10,000 foranex P eIt toman - 

age their advertis- 



ing. There are others who pay 
S>5.00 for an annual subscrip- 
* tion to PRINTERS' 

INK and learn what all the adver- 
tisers are thinking about. Buteven 
these are not the extr mesreached. 
There are men $100,000 
who lose over — — _« 
a year by doing neither one. 
For sample send 10 cents to PRINTERS' 
INK, No. 10 Spruce St., New York City. 



J 



JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

MEMBER CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 

MEMBER TONOPAH STOCK EXCHANGE 

Telephone Bush 3S5 

Bank Reference: California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, S. F. 

RECOMMENDS OF 

California Oil Stocks: 

"Home," "Kern" and 'Monarch" (of Arizona). 

Tonopah Mining Stocks: 

"Gold Mountain Consolidated," "Montana Tonopah," "Mizpah Extension." and 
"Tonopah Syndicate." 

California Gold Mining Stocks: 

"Cecil R." and "Grass Valley Consol." 

and other marketable and good and dividend-paying stocks and of which I am 

ready to give you further information. 

Send for a Copy of 

Ready Reference 
Tonopah Map 
Price List 

Whenever there is any notable development in a company or change in the 
price of stocks, my clients interested in same at once receive such information by 
wire or mail, without further charge. I also engage to keep. you fully posted on- 
your purchases made through my agency and thus oftentimes put you in a posi- 
tion to acquire desirable stock at low prices. 

Write to undersigned for prices before buying elsewhere; also for informa- 
tion regarding Oil and Mining Stock Investments paying regular dividends, re- 
turning 10 percent to 24 percent per annum; also for suggestions as to the best 
speculative purchases. Correspondence invited. Address: 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



HEALDS 



Business College and 
School of Engineering 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughting, 
Strength of Mateuals, and Surveying. ' 

THE MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis, Mill Con- 
struction, Milling, Mining, Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics 

BLECTE1CAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
Pracucal, Work Shop and laboratory Practice. Construction. Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics etc 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of abusiness education. Day and Evening Classes. 

JSTWrite f op new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 




W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



For prices, etc., inquire 

J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO, 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



San 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wreecb rSS^tt 




Djilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



OIL FOR MACADAM. 



rwClrll Uli, KhCUKIl.* 



Stockton to Try the Plan of Oil- 
ing Mncadamizcd Streets. 

Mayor Catts returned last night 
from San Jose, where he attended 
the annual convention of Cali- 
fornia Municipalities, says the 
Stockton Mail: 

" Was anything brought up that 
is of especial interest to Stock- 
ton?" was the question asked of 
him to-day. 

" Yes, there were two matters," 
he replied. "The first was the 
possibility of doing away with 
the sprinkling of macadamized 
streets. The plan advocated is to 
oil them. Two cities are now try- 
ing the experiment. We will 
wait until they get results, and 
then go ahead if the experiments 
prove satisfactory. We have a 
good many miles of macadamized 
streets, and the cost of sprinkling 
them is great. The stone pave- 
ment soon heats up and the water 
evaporates. Besides that, the 
mud forming on the surface of 
the streets from sprinkling tends 
to loosen the pavement, wagon 
wheels picking it up together 
with bits of rock. If the street is 
left dry the pavement soon wears 
out. Oil seems to offer a solution 
to all the trouble and expense. 



S^SSTf^'TSSffZi Opportunities in a Lifetime A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. E. 

isfied with the new gas and have 
formally accepted the service. 



/^YCNKT PBTROLKCM CO 

C"!""* 1 lijo.000 

50.000 iharefl at %y 

I.ocMtli-n— Hrr»no county. 

Director*— Chal. I. F«ir. pre»dent. BllUWPa.. 
too. ricc-prMUcnt. Cruu. A. Lee. trcuurer. John 
C. McKlroe. pcrreurr. 

Otoce— 361 Parrot! Bulldtrut. 

Tel — South 1S4. 



s 



TANOAKI) ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital $*».ooo 

Treasury stock S150.000 

Location: ga acres leased proven oil land In 
McKtttrick; So acres owned In Coalinjra near 
Home Oil company, Fresno; 160 acres owned ad* 
Joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Leased 6000 acres asphaltum land In Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery 1 erectc.1 

Officers: R A Palkenbem, president; M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawson, R P Chase, Col H J 
Ensign 

Offices: 47^-76 Parrott Building. 8m Market 
street. San Franciwro. Cal. 



OILED ROADS A SUCCESS 



Little Difference Between an As- 
phalt and an Oiled Road. 

When the oiling of roads was 
in the experimental stage, a con- 
temporary expressed a curiosity 
to know what kind of a highway 
an oiled road would make when 
it became a muddy road. The 
rains upon the oiled streets of 
Bakersfield where they have been 
properly crowned demonstrate 
that they do not become muddy. 
After one or two years of oiling, 
the water given an opportunity to 
run off, there is practically little 
difference between a well oiled 
road and an asphaltum street after 
a winter's storm. — Bakersfield 
Californian. 



Making Oil Into Gas. 

Two new gas plants have been 
established lately for the manu- 
facture of gas solely from crude 
petroleum. One of these plants 
is at Fresno and the other at Oak- 
land, both owned and operated by 
the same company, which has a 
three years' contract to supply the 
Oakland Gas Light and Heat com- 
pany with gas at from ten cents 
to twelve and a half cents per cu- 
bic foot cheaper than it has been 
made under the old process. The 
heavy fuel oil is pumped from a 
tank directly into generators, and 
the product is a superior quality 
of gas. A test made of that : sup- 
plied to the Oakland company 
recently showed twenty-seven 
candle power. A gas testing eight- 
een to twenty-two candle power 
was hitherto accepted as up to.the 
highest standard required. The 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424. 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the Largest stock. Onr prices are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 




Smith-Premier £ 
Typewriters * 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smilh 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Schools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

PaciBc Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Associat2on uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & 51. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 

110 Mont» nery St. San Francisco. 

Branch Stores: 

Spokane, Los Angeles and Portland. 



Beadqaarters School. Go* crimen aid 
Oil Lauds in California. 

School land* may he taken from i4o to (mo acre* 
Land* abound 111 .11 counties in s .1 
quire no condition a* to residence on tad or 
cultivation, nuil earn- nil mineral* »nd depoatu 
only fi. as an acre. ft**y term*. Fortune* have 
been mad* in all the California oil dMrtctt, Now 
la your opportunity School uuioaara adapted to 
Panning. Ranching. Timber I. an. I* and are the 
safest and Cheapest Speculation in the Dnltcd 
Stairs. Send ttunp for Land Book and Circular*. 
Fine pr.'\eit ml lands to offer. C 
solicited P.Mahltshed 18S5. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



219 Crocker Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum OH, Asphaltum and 
l indred hydrocarbons 



If You arc going East call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar for 
Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 

E. O. MCCORMICK. T. H. GOODMAN, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United states and 

•™«™ ^— «— Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 



PittsburK. Pa. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 



San Francisco, Cal 



W. E. YOULE 



! 




Hi 




y 


1 






tkn 






























, 






ISgHfejp. 








lisF^j 


"Qj^jL 


a 








J"2ti3kgj 








* 






•■■■ 


1 



CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Opinion on Oil Territory and 
Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
Stock, Oil Lauds and Pros- 
pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Present Address; 

Arbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin xhe Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 

ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. its tests range from shallow water wells to a lim*t of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 

1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simp 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free AKRON, OHIO. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GiIt=Edged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected, Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, = 



Stock Nonassessable. 
$350,000 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 




American Steel & Wire Co, 

CHICAGO NEW YORK WORCESTER DENVER SAN FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 



American Steel Wire Pumping Line 
American Steel Wire Tubing Line 
American Steel Wire Sand Line 
Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 



PACIFIC WORKS 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 

G TY SALES OFFICE 

8 and 10 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, ,AL. 



GEO. B. ISM0N 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. lO 



AGENCIES 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

E. R. ELDREDGE, Sales Agent o. D. COLVIN, Sales Agent 



Flexible Metallic Tubing 

The intelligent Mechanic will recog= 
nize "A GOOD THING" in FLEXIBLE 
METALLIC TUBING, a Reliable and 
Practically Indestructible Substitute 
for Rubber Hose for AH Purposes. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices, It Will Pay You 




Fop 



Suction 

and 

Discharge Pipes 



© 



FOB STEAM 
OILS, GAS 
AND HYDRAULIC 
PURPOSES 



CBAS. C. 
MOORE 
SCO., 
ENGINEERS 

Contractors 
for 

Complete 

Power 

Plants 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Main 
Office 

32 First St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Branch 
Offices 

Los Angeles 

Seattle 

New York 



Special New Year's Editioi 




Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 9. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1903. 



Price 10 Cents. 







Goods 

Manufactured 
By the 






OIL WELL 
SUPPLY CO. 



Of 

Pittsburgh, 
Penna. 



FOR 



Drilling & Operating Oil & Gas Wells 

Are known and used throughout the world, because they are 
The Best That Can Be Made. 



Business Established 1861 

Have Ten Fully Equipped Manufacturing Plants 



Special Attention is Invited to the Superiority of their 

Boilers, Engines, Drilling Tools, Etc. 



SOLE AGENTS 

READING IRON CO.'S 
IRON CASING, 
TUBING, DRIVE and 
LINE PIPE 



Stocks ot these Goods are carried 
by Dealers at 

Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, 
Bakersfield, 
McKittrick, 
Coalinga, Etc. 



«:«■ 



£S 




The accompanying half-tone group represents with abso- 
lute fidelity the interior arrangements of the offices of the 
Pacific States Mining and Investment company of 326 Post 
St., San Francisco. This company has followed the practice 
observable in most successful business undertakings, namely- 
beginning in a small way, and paying as it goes, making im- 
provements and enlargments only when demanded by steady 
increase of legitimate business. 

The offices of the company are centrally located, fronting 
on Union Square, which latter is being adorned by the Dewey 
monument, and around which large numbers of new build- 
ings, ranging from four to twelve stories, are rapidly going up 
to replace pioneer wooden structures. The Post Street Im- 
provement Club is working regularly for the beautificatlon 
and progress of the identical part of the thoroughfare on 
which the premises of the Pacific States Mining and Invest- 
ment company are located. 

In connection with the enterprise there is published a 
first-class monthly financial newspaper, devoting much of its - 
space to mining, oil, and industrial enterprises all along the 
Pacific coast from Alaska to the southern boundary line of 
Central America. The editorial articles show a wide range of 
knowledge of affairs in Mexico, British Columbia, the Central 
American republics, and the States and territories of the 
United States west of the Rocky Mountains. 

It will be seen from the illustration that the undertaking 
requires quite a considerable staff of employes, and that every- 
care is given to the comfort and convenience of visitors and 
employes alike. The entrance gallery is in bird's eye maled 



and silver. All the rooms have Axminster carpets, and are 
sunny, well lighted and warmed in winter, while in summer 
they are kept ventilated and cool. There are up-to-date lava- 
tories and toilet accessories of every kind, not shown in the 
illustration, located on the same floor. The first of the rooms 
actually shown is the chief business office, with stenographers 
seated at their desks. The adjoining quarters are the library 
and mineralogical collection room and the mailing room of the 
" Pacific States Investor." Further to the rear of the entrance 
gallery is the special reception room, furnished with great 
elegance and provided with every facility for .the dispatch of 
business at meetings of the board of directors connected with 
the various enterprises connected with the Pacific States Min- 
ing and Investment company. Adjoining this room is the 
laboratory and model room. In the view of this room is shown 
cautting apparatus specially designed and made by a regular em- 
ploye of the company for the new cannery of the Abalone Pack- 
ing company. The steamer " Romola," recently purchased for 
this concern, was also completely refitted, even to new iron 
plates, by employes of the Pacific States Mining and Invest- ■ 
ment company. 

The private office of the general manager, who is dictating 
to a stenographer, is shown, and likewise the mailing room of 
the "Investor." The paper goes to all parts of the world, and 
the circulation amounts to many thousand of copies. The 
daily official mail amounts to several hundred letters in English, 
German, French, Spanish, Italian, Japanese and Chinese. 
There is an underwriting department associated with the en- 
terprise, which is now in the twelfth year of its existence. 



^rg^z^^Tj^T j^^ 



<6 



Associated Oil Co. 

Asphalt Combination 15 

Alameda Oil Co 30 

Bunting, John A 15 

California's Oil Industry, Dr C. 

T. Deane 17 

Crude Oil in Smelting, A. Von 

der Ropp 24 

Careaga Oil Fields, Julius Kbel.37 

Coalinga Field 40 

Enos John 14 

Editorial — The Oil Situation. 1 
Flash Test, Paul W. Prut/man. 4 
Foreign Capital 29 

Alameda Oil Co., Well of 29 

Areola, Wells of 14 

Brea Canyon Oil Co , Well of. .20 
Baker, Thomas F., Portrait of. . 15 

Bay City Co., Well of 4 

California Fortune, Well of . . . . 19 

Claremont Oil Co., Wells of 27 

Cooper, A. S., Portrait of 22 

Coalinga Oil Fields, Views of. .40 

Chicago Crude, Wells of 3 

Center Co., Whittier, Wells of. 3 
Columbian Asphalt Co., Refin- 
ery of 6 

Cement Reservoir 8 

Deane, Dr. C. T., Secretary Cala- 

Pet. Miners' Association 17 

De Young. Portrait of Hon. M. 

H 2 

El wood, J., Portrait of 15 

Enterprise, Steamer 39 

Falkenberg, Major R. A 44 



Table of 

FullertonOil Field, Edgar John- 
son 20 

Gas-Making, Oil in. B. S Ped- 

ersen 45 

Half Moon Bay District 5 

Hatcher, CM 

Kern County Oil Excitement 
Kern Oil Field, Development of. 10 
Kern Field. Production, Pipe- 
line of. 11 

Kern Refineries 12 

Loomis, v teamer George 44 

Los Angeles Oil Field, T. Col- 
vllle 33 



Contents. 

, Latest Oil News 47 

McKittrick Field 13 

! Market for oil 13 

Map of McKittrick Field 15 

Map of Kern River Field 16 

Map of Sunset-Midway Field.. .47 

Map of Coalinga Field 41 

Midway Field, Hon. C. A. Bar- 
low 44 

New Franklin Refinery 36 

Petroleum Indications, A. S. 

Cooper, M. E 22 . . 

Petroleum Oil Fields, Limited.. 29 
Plotts' New Devise 30 



Peerless Oil Co 31 

Pacific Oil Transportation Co 

['reduction of 1902 1 

Refineries, California Oil 44 

Standard Rock Oil Asphalt Co.. 44 

Southern Pacific Tankage 5 

Sunset & Midway Fields 12 

Spellacy , Col. Tim 14 

Steamers Burning Oil 23 

Union Oil Co 26 

Young, C. S 14 



List of Illustrations. 



Fullerton Field, Well on Santa 

Fe Lease 20 

Fullerton, Union Oil Co's Bark- 

entine 26 

Hatcher, C. M. Portrait of 5 

Jewett & Blodgett, Wells of 28 

Kern River Field, General View 

of 24 

Kern River Field, View of. .... 16 

Kerr, J. E., Portrait of 5 

Lake of Oil in Sunset 18 

Lion Oil Co 11 

Los Angeles District 33-34-35 

Modelo Wells, Ventura County .22 

Monarch Oil Co., Wells of 30 

Monte Cristo Co., Reservoir of. .32 

Map of McKittrick Field 15 

Mariposa, Steamer 39 

Maricopa Oil Co., Well of 13 

Monarch Co., Wells of. 46 

Map of Sunset-Midway Field.. 47 



Murphy & Central Co.'s, Wells 

of 43 

Map of Kern River Field 16 

Map of Coalinga Field 41 

New Franklin Refinery 36 

Oil Tank of 37,000 barrels 21 

Occidental Oil Co., Well of 12 

O'Hara Co., Wells of 42 

Oroville Gas Works 45 

Point Arena, Geological Forma- 
tion at 22 

Potomac Co., Wells of 30 

Peerless Co., General View of 

Wells of 31 

Portraits of Wm. Ellery and H. 

H. Blood 9 

Pacific Oil Transportation Co., 

tanks at Honolulu 38 

Pacific Oil Transportation Co., 

Refinery of 37-38 

Petroleum Center Co., Wells of. 3 



Pumping Jack in Kern Field. . . 8 
Pacific Coast Oil Co., Wells of. . 5 
Santa Cruz, Drilling In Red- 
woods Near 23 

Setting Up Casing for Oil Well.25 

Superior Oil Co., Wells of 29 

Sunset, Group of Wells in 18 

Sovereign Oil Co., Wells of 10 

Sterling Oil Co., Log of Well.. .10 
Spellacy, Portrait of Col. Tim . . 14 
Standard Pipe-line, laying of. . 7 
Standard Oil Tank, Construct- 
ing a 43 

Train of Loaded Oil Tank Cars. 18 
Union Oil Co., Tank at the 

Islands of 26 

Western Union Oil Co., Wells of.37 

Ventura County Wells 42 

Western Union Well No. 3 38 

Whittier Crude 18 



THE COLUMBIAN OIL, ASPHALT 
& REFINING CO. 

CARPINTERIA, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY CALIFORNIA. 

Capital Stock, $1,000,000 ; Par Value of Shares, 10 Cents Each ; Fully Paid 
and Non-Assessible. $750,000 Worth in Stock in the Treasury. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 
President, Clarerce W. Ayers, Oil Expsrt, Carpinteria, Cal. 
Secretary, Herbret Gates, Electrical Engineer, Oakland, Cal. 
F. M. Parcells, Attorney, Oakland, California. 
Vice-President, Frank F. Titus. Capitalist, Oakland, Cal. 

Treasurer, John R. Scopham. Oil Operator and Mining Engineer, Oakland, Cal. 
J. W. Walker, Phcenix, Arizona. 




Photooraphic View of a Part of the Colombian Company's Immense Plant. 

Fabulous Wealth in Asphaltum. Deposits Unqeualed in Extent and Richness 
in the UnitedlStates. A Modern Refinery Rnnning Day and Night Turning Out 
Refined Asphaltum and its many By-Products, is the Brief Story of this Commer- 
cial Proposition now being Financed by Eastern Capitalist. 



STOCK 
ONLY 



PER 

SHARE 



45 DOLLARS TH0 



THOUSAND 



A 1-2 CENTS 
DIVIDENDS IN SIGHT- 
GREAT PROFITS ASSURED— 

AN INVESTMENT FOR THE PEOPLE 






Write at once for reports, subscription bhraks, photographs, etc 
stock payable to the company's fiscal agentu 



and make all remittances for 



THE AMERICAN INVESTMENT CO. 

2 Kilby St., Boston, Mass. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter Cables-best in tbe world 

We carry in stock heavy 75^-in., 554-in. and 
4j^-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6 in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 




CLIMATE and OIL 

MAKE 

CALIFORNIA 



THE 



LAND OF OPPORTUNITY 



All Productive Fields 



REACHED BY 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



Ogden Route 

New Overland Limited 

A 
World Beater 

Golden State Limited 

Via 

El Paso, Kansas City 

to Chicago. 

The 

Acme of Comfort 

In Travel 



East By South 

San Francisco— New Orleans 

Two 

Special Trains Daily 

Each Way 

Crescent City Express 

via Fresno 

Sunset Limited 

Via 
Caost Line 

Illustrated Literature Free 

Southern Pacific 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4. No. 9. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAT,.. SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1903. 



Prick, Ten Cents. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER bC26S51 barrcls ** r **"■ then Midway and McKittrick districts 

the 245 wells shut n could have the total possible output of the 



Published Weekly 

The 00 Authority of the Pacific Coast, 
ortad By th* California PatroUoa 
Mloera' Association 



W B. WINN. Editor-na Publisher 
Opficb *wd Rditoeial Room 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 



TKRMS 



Owe Ybak fa 50 

Six Months l 50 

Tumn Months 1 00 

SttfOLB Conns. ioc 

6TRICTLY IN ADVANCB 



Mowsv should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
Ji-3*-33- Conununlcatlonsmust be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of Rood faith. 



No attention will be paid to letters In- 
quiring, concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which Informa- 
tion Is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal. 
as second-class matter 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 3. iqo3 



The figures presented in the ac- 
company- 
The Oil Situation ing table 
will well 
repay study. Last year there 
were in the different oil districts 
of California 2,152 wells which 
produced 13.692,514 barrels of 
crude petroleum. 

The year before the 2,040 pro- 
ducing wells in California pro 
duced 8,742,500 barrels. 

The increase in the number of 
producing wells of 1902 over 1901 
is ii2, while the increase in the 
amount of production is 4,950,014 
barrels. 

This increase of production is 
more than the entire State of Cal- 
ifornia produced in 1900; in that 
year the total output of the State 
was only 4,329.950 barrels. 

Of the different districts it will 
be seen that the Kern River was 
the largest producer, nearly 9,000;- 
000 barrels coming from that dis- 
trict alone. To be more exact 
the Kern River district in 1902 
produced to within 100,000 bar- 
rels of the entire production of 
the State in 1901. 

Another deduction can be drawn 
from the table as follows : 

The product of the Kern River 
field was obtained from 322 wells. 
In this same field, however, 245 
wells capable of producing were 
not in use on account of lack of 
market and transportation facili- 
ties. It is right to suppose that 
the average production of these 
unused wells was equal to the 
average production of those in 
use. Estimating the average pro- 
duction of the wells in use to 



produced an additional amount of 
6 .576.49S barrels, making the total 



different fields in Kern county 
would exceed 20.000,000 barrels 



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Callforniti's Oil Record In 1902. 

The following statement of the oil production of 
California during the past year, and of the existing 
conditions in the producing fields, is absolutely reliable, 
and can be depended upon as correct. That the fig- 
ures given are correct can be judged from the fact that 
in January of last year this paper made a similar state- 
ment for the year 1901, which statement was practi- 
cally identical with that made by the United States 
Geological Survey and the State Mining Bureau, both 
of which proved the correctness of the statement pub- 
lished in the Pacific Oii. Reporter nearly nine 
months before. 

The following figures contain neither exaggeration 
or guesswork, and are of great value as a basis upon 
which to form intelligent judgments: 



Producing 
Wdis. 



Production 

Bbls. 



Producing Fields. 

Coalinga 19 

Santa Maria 5 

Midway 2 

Sunset 24 

McKittrick 37 

Kern River 322 

Summerland 228 

Newhall, Santa Paula 1 

and Ventura. } 3 7° •• 609,000 

Los Angeles 926 1,074,655 

Whittier 76 543.450 

Fullerton & Brea Canyon 98 1,201,909 

Puente 45 126,900 



504.545 
100,636 

50,180 

142,630 

597,600 

8,646,109 

94,900 



13,692,514 



Total 2,152 

Average daily production for the year . . 37,513 
Owing to lack of market and transportation facili- 
ties there are now shut in, and not being pumped, the 
following number of wells in the districts named : 



Santa Paula 13 

Coalinga 55 

Kern River 245 

McKittrick 40 



Sunset 55 

Midway 16 

Total of capped wells 424 
Wells are now being drilled in producing fields as 
follows : 
Newhall, Santa Paula 

and Ventura 23 

Puente 3 

Los Angeles n 

Summerland 2 

Coalinga 5 

Whittier 12 

Fullerton & Brea Can. 22 

Stocks of oil in tankage and reservoirs, 3,850,000 
barrels. 

The production of the State varies in gravity from 
9° Beaume, the lowest gravity in the Sunset field, to 
38 B., the highest gravity in the Newhall field. 

The depth of producing wells ranges from 200 
feet at Summerland to 2,500 feet at Fullerton. 



Kern River 28 

McKittrick 8 

Sunset 10 

Santa Maria 3 

Midway n 

Total 138 



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possible output of the Kern River 
field, 15,222,604 barrels. 

If we should add the wells shut 
in and being drilled in the Sunset- 



annually. 

Besides the enormous capabili- 
ties of the Kern county fields 
should also be taken into consid- 



eration the capabilities of e\ 
other oil field in the state, not one 
of which is producing a fractional 
part of what it is able to produce, 
as is well shown tn the ar'icles 
which follow. 

The capabilities of the state in 
the way of production are enorm- 
ous, and those who look merely 
upon this side of the question may 
well ask, "What shall be done 
with all this oil?" To offset this 
must be taken into consideration 
the fact that the consumption of 
oil in California is really just be- 
gun. In 1900 we consumed 4.329,- 
950 barrels; in 1901 we increased 
this consumption to 8.742,500 bar- 
rels; in 1902 we have increased 
this consumption to 13,692,514 bar- 
rels. The year 1903 will see the 
consumption of oil in California 
exceed 20,000,000 barrels, in fact 
it may approach nearly 25,000,000 
barrels. 

Few people realize how the con- 
sumption of oil is increasing. Take 
the railroads for example. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad 
company has now on its different 
divisions 504 locomotives burning 
oil. These locomotives consume 
600 barrels per month each, the 
total consumption for the engines 
of the Southern Pacific alone at 
the present time amounting to 
3,628,800 barrels per year, equal to 
almost the entire output of the 
state two years ago. 

This does not include by any 
means the entire number of en- 
gines operated by the Southern 
Pacific; in fact it is hardly one- 
half of those now running on the 
different divisions. 

Before the close of 1903, practi- 
cally all engines owned by the 
Southern Pacific Railroad com- 
pany will be changed from coal 
burners to oil burners and this 
company alone will be consum- 
ing nearly 6,000,000 barrels of 
crude petroleum yearly. 

The Santa Fe has 280 engines 
burning oil between San Fran- 
cisco and Winslow, Arizona. 
These include most of its pas- 
senger engines, and it is changing 
ing its freight engines as rapidly 
as possible. These engines of the 
Santa Fe will burn an additional 
2,000,000 barrels of oil in 1903. 

It will be seen therefore that 
the engines of the Southern Pa- 
cific and the Santa Fe roads, be- 
fore the close of 1903 will have 
consumed during the year close 
on to 8,000,000 barrels, equal to 
the entire production of the State 
in 1901. 

In 1901, there was hardly a 
steamer burning fuel oil on the 
Pacific coast; there are now in 
this State, 11 1 'steamers with a 
total tonnage of 88,981, burning 
oil and consuming it at a rate 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



which necessitates the pumping 
of hundreds of wells to their full- 
est capacity. 

It is not necessary to mention 
the hundreds of manufacturing 
interests that have begun to use 
oil for fuel in the last two years, 
nor to mention the industries and 
establishments other than manu- 
facturing which are also large con- 
sumers of liquid fuel. The list of 
consumers published elsewhere 
tells the story. 

In estimating- the consumption 
of oil in 1903 the capacity of the 
refineries should not be forgotten. 
At the beginning of 1902 only a 
dozen refineries were in operation. 
To-day there are thirty-two hav- 
ing together a total still capacity 
of 31,575 barrels, or a yearly con- 
sumption of over 5,000,000 barrels. 
This amount does not include 
what the big refinery at Point 
Richmond will require when it is 
ready to run at its full capacity, 
in April. 

In the making of gas, crude oil 
has been found to have no equal. 
It is superseding all other fuels 
even in the mines where wood 
and coal are supposed to be cheap 
and abundant. 

California has entered upon a 
new era of prosperity to which 
many causes contribute. Of these, 
however, none is more potent than 
that which has not only supplied 
a cheap and safe fuel, but which 
has given employment to thou- 
sands of laborers, has put into ac- 
tive operation millions of dollars' 
worth of machinery, and has given 
to desert land, before worthless, a 
value of thousands of dollars per 
acre. 

At the beginning of 1902 the 
situation of the oil industry was 
unsatisfactory. Production was far 
greater than the consumption, and 
on this account as well as on ac- 
count of poor management and 
foolish competition the price of 
Kern oil was in the neighborhood 
of 10 cents at the wells. Today 
oil is worth at least 20 cents at the 
wells, and much of it is selling for 
more, with the prospect of at least 
50-cent oil before the close of 
1903. 

The oil industry of California is 
yet in its infancy. We little 
thought four years ago that it 
would ever produce or be able to 
consume 8,000,000 barrels of oil a 
year. Last year it consumed 
nearly 14,000,000 barrels; this year 
it will consume at least 20,000,000 
barrels; next year there is every 
reason to believe that with the 
new usages to which oil is being 
put the total consumption of crude 
petroleum in this state will be not 
less than 40,000,000 barrels. 

The latest in regard to the oil 
situation is the reported intention 
of the Standard Oil company to 
purchase or obtain control of a 
large portion of the producing 
territory in the Kern River and 
McKittrick fields, including the 
properties of the Associated Oil 



companies, the Imperial, Thirty- 
Three and some others. 

While these reports cannot be 
authenticated it is a well-known 
fact that if such a deal could be 
consummated the result would 



poor management and the exer- 
cise of an unwise business policy 
has not only placed itself in a 
most unsatisfactory financial con- 
dition, but has lost to the oil pro- 
ducers millions of dollars that 



BRIGHT OUTLOOK FOR 1903. 



The outlook for the oil producer in 1903 is distinctly encourag- 
ing. During the year drawing to its close we have witnessed many 
advances towards that more general consumption of liquid fuel which 
is necessary to insure the producer a fair return for the commodity 
which is so rapidly displacing coal in this. State. A careful estimate 
shows that, despite an expanding manufacturing industry in 1902, 
the imports of coal were cut nearly in half. The result of this was 
to keep in the State about $2,200,000 which would have been ex- 
pended abroad for fuel. This excellent showing, I am confident, will 
be greatly surpassed in the near future by a largely increased use in 
many directions. The railroads are becoming larger takers of our 
oil; our gas companies are using more and more every day; our 




Hon. M. H. de Young. 
President of the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

dusty roads will absorb an immense quantity; it will not be long be- 
fore every steamer sailing out of a Pacific coast port will be using 
liquid fuel, and there is a good prospect of its successful employ- 
ment in the reduction of ores. It is used quite freely at our mines 
to produce energy. This expanding demand, due to to the multipli- 
cation of so many classes of consumers, cannot help but result in a 
greatly enlarged demand, which will enable the producer to earn a 
fair reward. I should not be surprised if in the very near future, in- 
stead of capping wells, all the good properties will be pumping day 
and night, and selling their products at remunerative prices. The 
growing consumption will easily absorb over 15,000,000 barrels in 
1903, a quantity I feel assured the wells of the State will produce, 
and for which a good market will be found during the year. So on 
the whole, I may say that the outlook is for a prosperous year. 

M. H. on Young. 



regarded the enemy of the pro- 
ducer the latter certainly could 
not be injured more by the Stand- 
ard than he was by the Associated. 
The policy of the Standard has 
always been to buy oil rather 
than produce it, and if the com- 
pany makes an exception to this 
rule by purchasing the Associated 
holdings it will be a big surprise, 
especially as the Associated can- 
not show clear title to its holdings. 
As the Associated is in a bad 
tangle, cannot sell its bonds, has 
to face a mob of dissatisfied stock- 
holders, and is under contract to 
sell millions of barrels of oil at 
cost or less than cost it will not be 
surprising to hear that the com- 
pany has made some deal with 
the Standard by which the latter 
practically controls it. The sooner 
this happens the better for all 
concerned, and the sooner will oil 
reach the 50 cent mark at the 
wells. This is only a fair price, 
making a rate of $1 a barrel de- 
livered in San Francisco. At this 
rate oil as fuel will be 40 percent 
cheaper than coal beside giving 
less trouble and dirt. 



THE OIL PIPE-LINE. 



very greatly help the oil situation 
and the industry generally, by 
destroying foolish competition and 
raising the price of oil. It is gen- 
erally conceded that the Asso- 
ciated Oil company through its 



might have been received had not 
the Associated cut the price to 
10 cents a barrel. If the Asso- 
ciated was out of the way the oil 
industry would flourish, and, 
though the Standard is generally 



All the Stations Will Be Com- 
pleted by January 15. 

E. R. Smith, the contractor, who 
is building the stations and aux- 
iliary buildings along the Stand- 
ard Oil company's pipe-line from 
Bakersfield to Point Richmond, 
states that the line will be com- 
pleted and oil pumped through it 
by the 1st of March. "At that 
time," he said, "we will have laid 
3,000,000 brick." The line is now 
laid, with the exception of a 
stretch of forty miles between 
Tracy and Bay Point. 

Ten of the stations have been 
completed with the exception of 
setting the boilers. Stations are 
now under construction at Mc- 
Cabe Siding and at Vernalis, 
twelve miles this side of Tracy. 
Each station consists of two brick 
buildings, costing $4,000 each, be- 
ing a boiler and a pump house, 
and two cottages costing $2,000 
each for the employes. At each 
station there will be a 600 horse- 
power engine. All the buildings 
will be completed by January 15. 

Enterprising Concern. 

Attention is called to the adver- 
tisement on the second page of 
this issue of the Pacific States 
Mining and Investment company, 
at the head of which is Mr. W. E. 
von Johannsen who is not only 
an exceptionally active man of 
affairs but is also the acting Con- 
sul of Costa Rica. 

The company is very "largely 
interested in the different min- 
ing, oil and other enterprises in 
California and also in more dis- 
tant parts, and handles many 
propositions which offer first-class 
inducements for the investment of 
capital. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CHEMICAL PROBLEMS. 

Questions in Oil that Must Be Worked Out 
by the Chemist. 

California Petroleum Presents an Exceedingly Fruit- 
ful Field for the Investigations of the Chemist 
on Account of its Peculiar Properties. 









l'r.if. Bdmond o'N'ril 

All chemical processes are at first 
experience 
to ascertain the leaks and to stop them. 
The history of any process is a his- 
tory of saving the waste and making 
use of the by-product — of making use 
of the useli 

Innumerable examples of this law 
might be quoted. Take carbonate of 
soda It was hrst made by burning sea- 
weeds and lixiviating the ashes. Then 
Lc Blanc thought it would be more 
economical to take the salt directly 
and convert it into carbonate without 
waiting for the slow absorbtive action 
of plants. He worked out a process, 



phuric and 
much of the niti Ex- 

ample after example could be given, 
but these will suffice. 

Vet there is a great field ior impi 
ment and discovery A few instances 
among many might he mentioned. The 
great smelting furnaces oi Shasta and 
elsewhere are pouring thousandfs ol 
tons of sulphuric acid into the atmos- 
phere, instead of converting it into 
sulphuric acid, and not only is it wast- 
ed, but it produces destruction, killing 
the vegetation and polluting the 
streams for miles around. 

The immense accumulation of isaw- 
tlust from the great saw-mills are 




Wells of Petroleum Center Oil Company, in the Kern R iver Fields. 



but with the single idea of making 
carbonate, the by-products were al- 
lowed to go to waste, and hundreds 
of thousands of tons of muriatic acid 
and calcium sulphide were poured into 
the air and into the streams and were 
lost. More than this, they were a det- 
riment and nuisance, and by proce- 
of law the manufacturers were com- 
pelled to impound their by-products. 
But, as a result of this regulation, use 
was found for them and now they are 
a profitable part of the manufacture. 
The same thing is true in the modern 
ammonia method for making carbonate 
of soda. 

Another striking example is that of 
coal-tar. At first, a by-product of gas 
manufacture, it was allowed to go to 
waste. Little by little the various con- 
stituents it contained were manufac- 
tured into salable products, and so val- 
uable have these former waste bodies 
become that conditions in some cases 
have been reversed, and coal is dis- 
tilled for the tar, and the gas is thrown 
away. 

Everywhere chemists are seeking to 
make use of the by-products. Modern 
industrial chemistry, like everything 
else modern, is worked on enormous 
scales, and the accumulation of resi- 
dues becomes correspondingly enor- 
mous. The ideal chemical process is 
where everything is useful and salable, 
and little by little all cnemical manu- 
facturing is approaching this ideal. 

Take the slags trom the Thomas 
process for making iron. fcilags are or- 
dinarily waste products anu are throwr 
away. They were shown to contain 
phosphorous, and were ground up am 
used for a fertilizer. In some cases the 
slag is more valuable than the ore. 
The waste molasses of the sugar re- 
fineries is being converted into alcohol, 
or it may be distilled with formation 
of tri-methyl amins and other valuable 
substances. The ash is a rich potash 
fertilizer. All the spent acid of the 
powder factories was formerly run to 



burned up to get rid of them. Many 
valuable products could be made from 
the cellulose contained therein. Until 
comparatively recently none of the 
cream of tartar from the wineries was 
saved, although it was worth forty 
cents a pound. Thousands of pounds 
of oranges and lemons go to waste, 
where valuable oils and acids could be 
extracted. 

. One of the best examples of a ne- 
glected field for chemical research is 
California petroleum. Most of it is 
used up as fuel and is burned up just 
as it comes from the ground. A per- 
centage is distilled, but most of the 
distillates, with the exception of a 



liable than 

been 

be true in the cane of the 

h more complicated in structure 
and contains many more valuable pro- 
ducts. Petroleums are never homo-' 

many 
kjuiil 
I 
re made up ma ffinc 

The California oils contain in addition 
to these paraffins, what chemists term 
ies and napthenes, These latter 
are analogous .f the 

■ul-tar. which, as has 
valuable that coal is 
distilled ior the exceedingly small per-. 
centage of tar th d; and the 

valuable benzols make up only a small 
traction of these I I the abso- 

lute amount of these aromatic bodies 
obtained from coal is exceedingly 
small, a fraction oi a per cent.. Con- 

ilv their price is high, win 
maintained by the great demand tor 
them. In California oils we have many 
of these bodies in 

nor is it very difficult to i 
them. Frequently, simple distillation 
will suffice. The valuable xylol ami sev- 



con- 
. but 

■ the 

rrling the 
'urns 
h the 
same illuminating te ob- 

tained from Pennsylvania oils, rather 
than devising methods oi washini 

coal 
oil. This latter method, while it can 

fully, necessarilv wastes a large propor- 
tion of the distillate It would be bet- 
ter, by some chemical treatment, to 
convert the unsaturated bodies to sat- 
urated ones, the undrsirabli 
the desirable ones. The question is 
theoretically comparatively simple, but 
no one as yet has devised an econom- 
ical praeiieal proci eat deal of 
■mental work ntUSl be done to- 
solving this nil' 
the one of determining what constitu- 
-t in the 
crude oil. This work i- beii 
on ai 

well as the facilities allove, and a good 
start has been made. The problems 
are new. and in many cases arc diffi- 
cult of solution, lull thev will lie solved 

Another great need for chemical in- 




Oil from Well of Chicago Crude Oil Company, Kern River. 



eral of its homologues may be thus 
separated, and they are present in no 
inconsiderable quantities. Other valu- 
able constituents of California oils are 
the nitrogen and -ulphur compounds. 
Some of them are of value as such, for 
the nitrogen compounds can be con- 
verted into ammonia, which is always 
salable at a good price. 

A second field tcr investigation is to 
devise methods for the improvement 
of the illuminants and lubricants dis- 
tilled from California oils. It would 
be beyond the limits of this paper to 
explain the reason of the differences 
between Pennsylvania and California 
oils that determine the different yields 




Wells of Center Oil Company, Whittier, Cal, 



vestigation of California petroleum 
was strikingly shown in the case of the 
Frogreso disaster. There are elabor- 
ate but proper regulations in regard to 
transportation and storage of oil but 
practically no mention is made of the 
chemical constitution of the oil. And 
yet the character of the oil determines 
in a large degree the possibility of an 
explosion. The storage conditions are 
of importance, but the constitution of 
the oil is of more importance. The dan- 
ger point cannot always be determined 
by applying a single test such as the 
Hash point. Many other conditions 
will influence the liability to an ex- 
plosion. And even if the flash test be 
employed, the apparatus usually em- 
ployed is so primitive that very dis- 
cordant results may be obtained even 
in the hands of experts. What is need- 
ed is a careful survey of the whole ques- 
tion and the adoption of proper and 
lust regulations. The tests to be ap- 
plied should be clearlv defined and the 
instruments used should be modern and 
accurate. They need not be compli- 
cated and cumbersome, but above all 
they should be accurate. 

In conclusion, we may safely say 
that in California petroleum we have 
a great field for investigation. The 
composition of the oil is so complex 
and it contains so many bodies that will 
certainly prove of value that it is al- 
most certain that the next few years 
will witness an entirely different meth- 
od of working the oils. The isolation 
and purification of these products, and 
the improvement of the quality of the 
ordinary distillates will furnish prob- 
lems that the most ambitious chemist 
will be glad to solve. That he will 
solve them is certain, and when his 
task is accomplished, his success will 
be for the benefit of the whole of Cal- 
ifornia. 

Edmond O'Neill. 

Associate Professor of Chemisttry, 
University of, California, Berkeley, 
Cal., December 20, 1902. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



FLASH TEST OF OIL. 



Matters of Vital Interest to Users of Liquid 

Fuel. 



How and Why Oil Gives Off Inflammable VaPor. 
How This Becomes a Source of Danger, and 
How the Danger Can Be Avoided. 



By Paul W. Prutznian. 



The Hash-point of an oil is rather 
loosely denned as "the temperature at 
which it will give off an inflammable 
vapor." It may be of interest to point 
out how and why an oil gives off in- 
flammable vapor, how this vapor may 
become a source of danger, and how 
such danger may be obviated. 

In the first place, oils do not burn, 
though their vapor does. That is to 
say, a portion at least of the oil must 
be changed -to a vapor or gas before 
ignition can take place, but combus- 
tion once started will furnish (gener- 
ally) enough heat to convert more of 
the liquid to a gaseous condition, so 
that burning may go on without the 
aid of any outside heat. For instance, 
if a lighted match be plunged into a 
cup of gasoline, the oil will at once 
burst into flame, because gasoline is 
so volatile that evaporation (that is 
from liquid to gas) is continually go- 
ing on. But if instead of gasoline we 
take a good grade of kerosene, the 
match would be extinguished, for the 
reason that kerosene requires a higher 
heat to convert it into vapor. If in- 
stead of a match we used a gas jet, 
and kept the flame in one place on the 
surface of the kerosene, this spot 
would soon be heated sufficiently to va- 
porize the oil, which would then take 
fire, and would probably continue 
burning. If. in place of kerosene we 
used a heavy lubricating oil, we would 
probably have some difficulty in light- 
it, even with a gas flame, and if we 
succeeded in lighting it the flame 
would go out almost as soon as the 
source of heat were removed. 

It is well known that different oils 
give off vapor at different tempera- 
tures. For instance, gasoline vapor- 
izes at the ordinary temperature of the 
air, so that if a quantity of it be left 
uncovered it will quickly disappear. 
Kerosene being less volatile requires 
some heat to make it evaporate, the 
ordinary grade not giving off any sen- 
sible amount of vapor below no to 
120 degress Fahrenheit. Lubricating 
oils require yet more heat, until finally 
we come to a heavy cylinder oil which 
would not evaporate appreciably under 
600 degrees Fahrenheit. 

If now. instead of heating the oil in 
an ordinary vessel we place it in a small 
glass cup. insert in it a thermometer, 
and provide means by which a flame or 
spark can be passed over ■ its surface 
at regular intervals, we have a flash 
tester. The ordinary instruments used 
for that purpose consist of a glass cup 
for the oil, a little larger than an egg, 
suspended in a little vessel of wafer 
(called a water-bath), and the whole 
set in a sheet metal frame to hold it in 
position. An arm Holds a thermometer 
sn that the bulb dips in the oil, a small 
alcohol or gas flame heats the water, 
which in turn heats the oil. and an ar- 
rangement is added by which at inter- 
vals an electric spark may be passed 
between two metallic points set close 
to the surface of the oil. If we fill the 
cup with the oil to be tested, light the 
flame under the water bath, and every 
minute or so pass a spark over the oil, 
some time may elapse before any re- 
sults are seen. Finally, however, a lit- 
tle blue flame will be seen to flash 
across the surface of the oil. The tem- 
perature indicated by the thermometer 
at this point is called the "flash-point." 
It means simply, that the oil has be- 
come hot enough to give off a sensible 
amount of gas or vapor. If we con- 
tinue to heat the oil, passing sparks 
occasionally, each spark will produce 
a flash, each flash a little larger than 
the one before, until finally the oil will 
burst into flame and continue burning. 
The temperature noted here is called 
the "burning point" and indicates that 
the oil is sufficiently hot to give off 



enough gas to maintain a steady 
flame. 

The instrument described above 
would be an. open tester, since the 
surface of the oil is open to the air. 
The "closed test" instrument differs 
simply in having a tight hood over the 
oil cup, with a small hole on the top. 
This hole is closed by a slide, which 
is drawn back when the spark or flame 
is applied to the opening. The differ- 
ence in results, which is well known, 
is due to the fact that in the open test 
the gas and vapor given off by the oil 
is partly carried away by the air, by 
diffusion and by air currents, so that 
a pretty steady stream of gas must be 
given off before enough will be pres- 
ent between the sparkling points to 
give the flash. In the closed test the 
vapor cannot be carried off in this 
manner, but mixes with the air in the 
hood until in the right proportion for 
explosion, when the flash results. It 
will be evident that as one of these 
instruments collects all the vapor which 



is given off, while with the other a 
large part is carried away as soon as 
formed, the one which collects all (the 
closed tester) will give the flash at a 
very much lower temperature than will 
the other. As to which of these in- 
struments most nearly represents the 
average conditions under which an oil 
might be heated, there is difference of 
opinion, and I would not care to state. 
But I think it altogether probable that 
when we take the conditions existing 
in a closed fuel tank, the closed test 
would most nearly represent these con- 
ditions. However, there is a fairly 
constant difference between the results 
by the two tests, so that if allowance 
is made for this difference, the flash 
can be determined by either of the 
methods. This difference is stated by 
B overton Redwood, an eminent au- 
thority who compared with the two 
methods over a thousand samples of 
kerosene, to be twenty-seven degrees, 
and while with crude oils the differ- 
ence would not be so constant as with 
kerosene, yet it would probably not 
be less than twenty nor more than 
thirty degrees, which is quite close 
enough for all practical purposes. In 
other words, if we find that to be safe 
an oil must not flash below a certain 
temperature bv the closed test, and add 
twenty or thirty degrees to this figure, 
we would find the minimum tempera- 
ture at which it should be allowed to 
flash by the open test. 

In fuel oils, there are two causes 
which lead to the giving off of inflam- 
mable gas or vapor. One is the pres- 
ence of volatile oils which evaporate, 
the other is the presence of permanent 
gas dissolved in the cil. Very light 
oils almost always contain, in their 
crude state, volatile substances which 
evaporate readily, and if these oils are 
stored in a tank with a vent at the ex- 



i;eme top only, they wi'l fill the tank, 
displacing the air, by vapors which are 
heavier than ajr. While the very heavy 
crude oils very seldom contain much 
volatile oil, they somet'inet hold gas 
in solution. This gas is held by the oil 
just as carbonated water holds gas in * 
s. dution after the effervescence is over, 
and in the same way the stt.s is forced 
out when the liquid is heated. To all 
practical purposes, the difference be- 
tween vapor and gas in fuel oil is that 
the quantity of gas which might be held 
in solution in a heayy oil is limited, 
while a very light oil may give off an 
indefinitely large amount of vapor. 

Another important point is that 
gases or -vapors of this nature will not 
explode except in the presence of air. 
Suppose we had a tank containing a 
little very light oil, which had filled the 
tank entirely full of vapor, displacing 
all the air. If now a light were made 
inside the tank without admitting the 
air, the light would be extinguished. 
If the light were placed at the vent of 
the tank, where air and vapors meet 
and mix, the vapors would burn quiet- 
ly. But if the tank were filled with a 
mixture of vapor and air, in just the 
right proportion, a violent explosion 
would result. The proportion of vapor 
to air which would produce the most 
violent explosion would depend some- 
what on the nature of the vapor, but 
roughly it may be put at from two to 
four per cent. Any increase of either 
air or vapor beyond this proportion, 
would lessen the explosion, until finally 
there would be none at all. 

In order then to have an explosion, 
we must have in the fuel tank an oil 
which gives off gas or vapor at the 
temperature at which it is used, and the 
mixture with this gas or vapor of a 
certain amount of air. Furthermore, 
it must be possible that a flame or 




Well of Bay City Company, in 22, 32-23 Midway. 



at body, m 



PACIPIC OIL REPORTER 



> gainst 

lermine the 
ill tank at the end 

ximum 

■ 

:i the 
iy that 
imped which is immed 

Ilk, the tcm- 

simply 

'ins; air. and tins 

are mechanical d 

•her hand, ii the circulating 
lied, where tnor. 

tctn than the burn- 
urncd tn the 
. the temp the lank 

.v hour-, as 
re k"- 
lo the burners, so thai what rc- 
• to the tank is hoi Whichever 
ni is in use. if the highest tem- 
perature to which the oil rises can be 
found, and we add to this figure say 
thirty degi iver the difference 

■ noted between the two methods 
-tine, we have the minimum figure 
hich the oil should flash by the 
I open test to be <|iiite safe. To 
a figure should he added a small 
or errors, and to leave 
a margin of safety, the si/e of which 
nance would be a matter of opinion. 
But if the figure obtained in this way 
should be found to be so high that an 
ilfilling the requirement could not 
practically be used simple pre- 

cautions would add greatly to the safe- 
I using an oil of itself unsafe. In 
the first place a fuel tank should be 
perfectly tight, so that no leakage 
could take place, and this is essential 
not only in the portion of the tank be- 
low oil level, but also in the upper por- 
tion and in connections, as a vent at 
or near the ground might allow gas to 
escape, which being heavier than air, 
could travel over the surface to a fire 
some distance away. It should of 
course be so placed that its collapse 
would not endanger its surroundings: 
under ground is the ideal situation. 
Again it should have a gas vent extend- 
ing as high and as far from buildings 
- possible, and the opening for fill- 
ing should be so fitted that when not in 
i^e it may be kept tightly closed. If 
any gas or vapor is given off. its natu- 
ral tendency is to escape by the lowest 
opening. I am not much of a believer 
in the compressed air method for clear- 
ing a tank from gas, as I should consid- 
er it safer, ii using a gassy oil, to allow 
the vapor to completely fid the tank, 
in which condition it would be com- 
paratively harmless, rather than to con- 
cert it into an extremely explosive 
r'ixture by admixture of air. A much 
safer arrangement is a steam-pipe lead- 
ing into the tank, so placed that its 
cr/cning \\;V, be always abovj the sur- 
face of the oil, and provided with a 
handy valve by which a full head of 
steam may be instantly turned into the 
tank. Steam is extremely efficacious 
in quenching and preventing gas fires, 
and cannot form explosive mixtures 
with the gas. 

With such simple precautions as 
these, any fair grade of oil can be 
handled with almost as much safety as 
can wood and coal. It would certainly 
seem to be rational to choose an oil 
which will leave a fair margin between 
the maximum temperature at which it 
is used, and I be lowest flash-point. 
With ordinary conditions, there should 
be no difficulty in doing Ibis, as most 
of the oils sold here at prices making 
them available for fuel, have high flash- 
points, well above what would be need- 
ed for anv properly installed fuel plant. 
' would not be misunderstood as 
taking to myself any credit for origin- 
ality in the above remarks, which to 
those familiar with the regulations of 
the Fire Department of San Francisco. 
must seem very trite The «ubiect is 
me which might well be dwelt on. 
even at the Ci st of repetiti in 

Paul W. Prutzman. 
San Fra-icisco, December 22 TO02. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 



HALF MOON BAY DISTRICT. 

A New OH Region That Promises To Be a 
Great Producer. 



The Oil Thus Far Obtained Not Great In Quantity, 
But Is o! the Best Quality For Refining Pur- 
poses Yet Discovered In the State. 



history or account of the oil fields 

.fornia would be complete without 

mention of the prospective fields located 

in San Mateo county near the town and 

harborof Half Moon Bay. 

The term "prospective fields " is used 
because up to the present time just 
enough oil development work has been 
done to demonstrate the fact that oil ex- 
ists in the field, but not enough work has 
yet been done to secure an output of oil 
enough to class the field among the pro- 
ducing territories of the state. 

The development work now being done 
is by no means the first to have been 
tried in this field. 




J. E. Kerr. 

Ten years ago or more the Pacific 
Coast Oil company, now included in the 
Standard, thought enough of the oil in- 
dications in the county to start work in 
the Purissima canyon on a large scale. 
A bunkhouse for the men was erected 
containing forty rooms, a fine house for 
the superintendent was built, and sev- 
eral wells were sunk, some deeper than 
others, but most of them shallow. In 
some of these wells oil was struck to- 
gether with much gas, and for a while 
several of these wells were thought to be 
good producers, and great excitement 
resulted. In time it was shown that the 
drills had penetrated only very thin 
strata of oil sand, which contained some 



oil, not enough, however, to warrant the 
company eithei ill drilling more wells or 
111 keeping those it had drilled. The en- 
' tire plant was abandoned, and reverted 
to the ownersof the land, who have since 
that time obtained quite a revenue by 
pumping oil in small quantities fiom the 
old wells and selling it at nigh prices to 
desiring it. It is a high gravity 
62°oil, the best in the state. A picture 
of one of these old I'acificCoast Oil com- 
pany's wells is given with this article. 

Alter the abandonment of the field by 
the Pacific Coast Oil company little was 
done in the search for oil for some years. 
Although geological indications of 
the presence of petroleum in great 
quantities abounded, and although 
scientists grew enthusiastic over the pos- 
sibilities, capital became chary of invest- 
ing money hunting oil after the experi- 
ences of the P. C. O. C. 

About a year or a little more ago a firm 
consiiting of Guibersou, Sallee & Hayne 
renewed operations on' the Purissima, 
and with considerable success, sufficient 
to warrant thetu in continuing operations, 
until now they have a number of shal- 
low wells, have five of them pumping, 
and, if the well were kept free, could 
easily obtain from the five wells fifty 
barrels daily. The two best wells are 
now choked up with sand owing to the 
gas pressure, and that they are not clean- 
ed out is due to the fact that the tools 
necessary are now employed in the drill 
ing of a deep well. The oil from these 
wells is all sold to the Knapp refinery at 
Half Moon Bay, where fine distillates are 
made. This refinery was started last 
fall when it became evident that the 
Guiberson wells were fair producers. 
The oil is better than 5& . and sells at 
f 1.25 at the well. 

On the next canyon north Prick & 
Parker have two shallow wells, small 
producers, and are going after a deep 
well. 

The companies with which Mr. J. E. 
Kerr is connected are making honest and 
apparently successful efforts to get oil in 
the Tunitas canyon. The companies 
are the Paxton, American, Duchess, 
Illinois and Wisconsin companies. Of 
these the Wisconsin was the first to put 
down a well to the oil, and the result of the 
drilling is known only to a few. The well 
was drilled over 1,200 feet when oil was 




Old Well of the Pacific Coast Oil Company, San Mateo County. 



large 

The oil was abundant, and 
. do»n the hill, 
and Ita course down the creek can be 
marked (or 

Mr. Kerr * 
nenta except to 
slate he was well satisfied with o]vera- 
tions. 

It is believed that the oil struck was 
struck in the first real oil sand vet found 
in the Half Moon Hay field, and that the 
well is now being pushed down to the 
and Strata, which are supposed to 
lie at a depth of about 1,600 feet 

Across the ridge the San Mateo Coun- 
ty Oil conipony is endeavoring to com- 
plete their well, which is now dowu over 
r, too feet, This is a k propo- 

sition, and themauager. Dr. Neiinieister, 
has great faith in it. The well has a big 
gas flow, and signs of oil are abundant. 
The 1'ilarcitos is a Redwood City com- 
pany, drilling north of the Wisconsin. 

The Cascade is an eastern Company 
thi-t is waiting development before drill- 
ing. The company has a large acerage 
of laud that has good oil indications. 

SUCCESSFUL OPBRATOR. 



Has Made a Success in the east- 
ern and Western States. 

Mr. C. -M. Hatcher is a Kentuckian by 
birth, and came to California about 
fifteen years ago. If memory serves 
correctly about the first real hard job 
he ever tackled was hustling subscribers 
for a paper in Southern California the 
editor of the Pacific Oii, Reporter 
was then publishing. 

Charlie was an unsophisticated young 
fellow in those days, with an innocent 
face, a bland smile and a Southern 
drawl and accent that would soothe the 




C. M. Hatcher. 

weary brain and make the average man 
fork out f 1.50 for the paper as if he was 
doing himself a favor. At any rate 
Charlie made a stake, and having made 
it pulled out for new fields. He got hold 
of fruit land in Alameda county and 
made a bushel of money out of it, went 
into a railway deal in San Jose and came 
out way ahead, came to San Francisco 
and turned his attention to promoting 
oil and mining propositions. He has 
made a success of these, and has now 
opened offices in Boston where he has 
got some all wool and a yard wide propo- 
sitions, both in oil and in mines. It is 
needless to say he will be successful, 
and when he tires of the Eastern cold 
and snow he can have a situation 
on the Oil REPORTER any day he likes' 



More Tankage Provided. 

The Southern Pacific is increas- 
ing its tankage on the San Joa- 
quin division. A huge tank, 55,- 
000 barrels capacity, was com- 
pleted a few days ago at Santa 
Barbara. Work will be commenced 
at once on one of 15,000 capacity 
at Mohave. Six new tanks of 55,- 
000 barrels each are being erected 
at Oil City in the Kern River field, 
where the company already has 
eight completed. One of 5,000 
has been erected at Goshen, one 
of 15,000 at Fernando, and three 
of 55,000 each at Olig are in course 
of construction. It is expected 
that a large tank will be erected 
later in Bakersfield. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter Is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



#*' 



••:,/ 



WM53& 




Refinery of Columbian Asphalt Company at Carpinteria. 



DEVELOPMENT NEAR THE SEA. 



What is Being Done at Summerland and 
Carpinteria. 



A Deep Well Being Sunk on Ortega Hill Back of Sum- 
merland— The Refinery at Carpinteria Now Run- 
ning Successfully— Its Product in Demand. 



By C. W 

Just at the present time there 
is no part of the State of Cali- 
fornia causing more interest in 
oil matters than Santa Barbara 
county. 

Until several years ago, it was 
not believed that more than a 
nominal amount of oil-bearing 
territory existed there, although 
the most flattering "indications" 
could be found in abundance in 
more than one section. The very 
prolific fields of Kern county drew 
all the attention of speculators and 
producers to that point and 
neglecting others that now prove 
to be as profitable, if not as pro- 
lific a section as any on the Pa- 
cific coast. The Summerland field 
with its 350 or more producing 
wells, that for the past five years 
have been steadily yielding be- 
tween 25,000 and 30,000 barrels 
of oil per month without in any 
apparent degree lessening the 
supply, and all embraced within a 
limit of not more than 100 acres 
of land, shows at once the enor- 
mous possibilities of further de- 
velopment. 

The newest field now under de- 
velopment is the district around 
and near Santa Maria, in the 
northwestern corner of the county 
and distant from the Summerland 
field about fifty miles. 

Less than two years ago, the 
work of development was begun, 
when a test well was put down to 
a depth of two thousand feet into 
the deep oil-bearing strata, and 
to-day the production from twelve 
wells, varying in depth from 900 
to 2,100 feet amounts to about one 
thousand barrels per day. 

The work of proving this field 
was very expensive, and trying 
on the nerve of the few men who 
were putting up the money to 
pay for it, and when their first 
well, that was carried to a depth ol 
2,000 feet at an outlay of forty 
thousand dollars, was "collapsed" 
by an earthquake, and rendered 



Ayers. 

useless and a heavy loss to them, 
it would have been enough to dis- 
courage less intrepid men, but 
tortunately for this section of the 
county, and also for those finan- 
cially interesttd, they did not 
give up, but went immediately to 
work to put down another well 
only a short distance trom the first 
one. Within four months it was 
completed, and came in with a 
flow of six hundred barrels oi 
twenty-two gravity oil per day ot 
twenty-four hours. Since then 
every well put down has proven a 
success, and another large and 
prolific oil field added to the credit 
of California. 

At Summerland, all the wells 
were completed at depths ranging 
from 150 to 400 feet and yielded 
when first brought in from 50 to 
100 barrels per day. 

These shallow wells were not 
expensive to put down, and the 
result is that the small tract of 
land obtainable for the purpose, 
was literally honeycombed with 
holes, and so close together that 
the production of one good well 
was divided into fifteen or twenty, 
so that the average yield of each 
well was cut to about five barrels. 

Even this however made a good 
and profitable well, as a group of 
fifteen or twenty wells is pumped 
and handled by one power plant, 
and thus operated as one well. 
Owing to the great scramble 
among oil promoters to get land in 
this field, wherein they were ab- 
solutely sure of getting " produc- 
tion" at a small outlay, the small 
tract of about 100 acres was cut up 
and divided into so many small 
holdintS, that no one was ap- 
parently justified in sinking a 
deep and expensive hole to reach 
the deeper oil bearing strata be- 
neath. 

The great Ortega Rancho, con- 
taining nine hundred acres of 
land, completely surrounds the 
small tract that was divided up 
and developed, owing to the un- 
settled affairs of an estate to which 
J it belonged, as well as being in- 



volved in serious litigation, it, was 
impossible for any person or com- 
pany to obtain a portion of it of 
sufficient size to justify the ex- 
pense of sinking a deep test well. 

Within the past months all these 
difficulties have been removed 
through the sale of the rancho to 
Mr. I. H. Ackerman of San Fran- 
cisco, who in turn has leased to 
the Crescent Oil company fifty- 
two acres, and the company are 
now engaged in developing it on 
an extensive scale. 

One of the heaviest and most 
complete drilling outfits on the 
coast is at worK putting down a 
sixteen-inch hole, and have now 
reached a depth of over eight hun- 
dred feet. 

The several known strata of oil 
sand, as reached by all the shal- 
low wells, were passed through 
and cased out. At seven hundred 
and forty feet a new stratum was 
reached that showed considerable 
oil, and it is now believed that it 
will not be neceasary to go to a 
depth of two thousand feet, as 
originally supposed, to reach the 
heavy producing sands. 

In the Santa Maria district the 
oil bearing strata are buried deep 
with massive deposits of tertiary 
shale. In the Summerland district 
much of the covering has been 
eroded and washed away, bring- 
ing the oil strata nearer to the sur- 
face, thus making considerable dif- 
ference in depth of hole necessary 
to reach them. 

Owing to the movement and 
change of position of the forma- 
tion at Summerland it has been 
found very difficult to put down a 
deep hole. . It is with this knowl- 
edge that the Crescent Oil com- 
pany started its well with sixteen- 
inch casing, which gives an al- 
most certainty of finishing a suc- 
cessful well at a depth of 2,000 
feet if necessary, and which the 
company are fully prepared to do. 

Just south of the Summerland 
field, and within full view of it 
along the coast, lies the rich de- 
posits of pure asphaltum that is 
known amony manufacturers of 
this material as the richest in pure 
bitumen of any in the known 
world. 

Covering a tract of about 100 
acres in extent, and starting from 
the very ocean edge, with its bot- 
tom several feet below the water 
level, is an enormous deposit or 
field of asphaltum-saturated sand 
averaging in depth or thickness 
about fifteen feet. This entire 
space was once occupied by a 
great lake of liquid bitumen, into 
which the beach sands were blown 
by the winds and washed by the 
ocean water until the liquid be- 
came absorbed by the sand, and 
formed into an almost perfect 



street-paving material, consisting 
of about 15 to 20 percent as- 
phaltum and 80 to 85 percent clean 
beach sand. 

In the course of time the greater 
portion of the volatile substances 
evaporated and left the heavy tar- 
like residue, which formed a per- 
fect binder or cement to the sand, 
which has packed down to almost 
the condition and consistency of a 
sandstone. 

Directly beneath this "bitumin- 
ous" sand, and forming its bed, is 
the shale rock through which the 
liquid that formed the lake was 
forced from its source of supply 
far beneath. In many places in 
the bed of the lake where the 
sand and surface deposits have 
been removed liquid asphaltum 
can be seen forcing its way up, to 
again refill the place whence the 
other was taken. 

Many thousand of tons of pure 
asphaltum have been taken from 
only several acres of this land, and 
it was obtained by extracting and 
separating it from the sand. 

It apparently did not occur to 
the operators that underneath the 
surface deposit of saturated sand 
there must be a great and inex- 
haustible supply of the pure 
liquid that could be opened and 
brought up by sinking wells down 
to it and pumping it out, and at 
far less expense. 

The Columbian Oil, Asphalt and 
Refining company, through its 
manager, Mr. John R. Scupham, 
saw the opportunity, and was 
quick to grasp it. 

This company has acquired by 
lease and purchase nearly the 
whole of this immensely rich and 
valuable tract of lsnd, and have 
now a large force of men and 
machinery drilling wells and 
otherwise developing it. 

They have just completed and 
are now operating one of the most 
complete and successful refining 
plants in this state, and are turn- 
ing out an exceptionally high 
grade of asphaltum and engine 
and stove distillates. They are 
equipped with a large amount of 
storage for both crude oil and their 
refined products, a feature of great 
advantage over many refining 
plants, in that they need not make 
any sacrifices to the market for 
lack of space to 'hold for better 
prices. 

The manager is now engaged in 
planning to erect storage tanks at 
several points in. the state for the 
delivery of stove distillates to con- 
sumers. 

Orders for this exceptionally 
fine grade of asphaltum are re- 
ceived daily from all parts of the 
United States and from Europe 
that will keep them busy for some 
time. 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTKR 




laying the eight-inch, 2~s -mile Pipe-Lint from BakersfieUl to Point Richmond, 



OIL FIELDS OF KERN COUNTY. 



The Largest and Richest Oil Territory Yet 
Discovered. 



An OH Region That In Extent and Capabilities Ex- 
ceeds Any Other In the World, and Which as 
Yet Has Hardly Begun to Be Developed. 



By H. G.James. 



The experience of a sky rocket is 
the history of nearly all oil fields. 

Dormant acreage, a touch of the 
master hand, a blaze of glory, regres- 
sion, history. 

But what a story! 

If all the thrilling domance, all the 
wild tales of fortunes made and lost, 
all the frightful records of murder, fire 
and explosion were extracted from 
that innocent word OIL, and woven 
into a single novel narrative, it would 
make most exciting reading, and in 
comparison, the wildest and most 



fanciful dreams that ever found origin 
in the fertile imagination of Marie 
Correlli would pale into insignificance 
and tameness. 

But God never made anything use- 
less or low; he had a purpose in all 
his handiwork. 

So the steep hills of Pennsylvania, 
the low swamps of Ohio, the crazy 
mountains of West Virginia, and the 
barren 'lands qf California, by the 
touch of the master hand of man, have 
been made to produce literally livers 
of oil to facilitate the ways of com- 



merce, enrich the nations and emplo) 
man, if not make him hap] 

Oil fields,' besides petroleum, some- 
times produce queer crops. Eastern 
fields produced some great wells, not 
a few hybcrbolical fortunes, one or 
two dry holes, and a rich harvest of 
liars of rare genius. 

California has produced hers. 

Oil was a known quantity in the 
Keystone and Empire States years be- 
fore it became a commercial product. 
It was finally developed as a result of 
surface indications. 

The same was true in California. 

In these Eastern fields there was the 
first wild, mad rush; the expending of 
vast fortunes; the organization of num- 
berless corporations of astounding 
capitalization, the bursting of the bub- 
ble — the slump. 

California beat them all. 

Then came the reaction, the settle- 
ment to legitimate business, the estab- 
lishment of markets, the realization of 
profits as a result of natural and con- 
servative operations, real benefit to 
the community, the amassing of wealth. 

California is today entering upon 
this period. 

In fact, to this time the Golden 
State has been no exception to the 
rule since the palmy days of Oil Creek. 



And tin re is no likelihood that the 
future history of the industry here 
will prove an exception. Think bl a 
real oil ticM without some big wells, 
immense fortunes that never were 
made, at least one or two 
dry holes, a liberal allowance of blast- 
ed hopes, possibly a lone honest re- 
porter of conditions, and a notable 
brigade of oil country liars. 

An oil country would be dull and un- 
interesting without them; it would not 
be an oil field. 

California has not failed. 

And in matters of petroleum Kern 
county occupies the same position in 
relation to the industry in this State 
that McKean county, with its great 
Bradford field, did in Pennsylvania. 

The great rush, the wild expending 
of money, the development of the bus- 
iness to a commercial and permanent 
basis, occurred in Kern county. And 
it came at a time when it meant almost 
salvation to the State, especially the 
southern part — after long years of 
drought, the discovery of this oleagi- 
nous fluid came like a refreshing 
shower to save the country. 

California cannot be too apprecia- 
tive of the industry that has done so 
much for the State. 

DISCOVERY OF THE KERN 

FIELD. 

It is not the purpose of the writer 
to give a scientific account of the de- 




Constructing a 35,000-barrel oil tatk for the Standard Oil Company in K-:n River Field. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



velopment of the Kern River oil field. 
Others have done that and speculated 
upon scientific principles until the av- 
erage oil man has little faith in science 
so far as it relates to oil. This will 
be a narrative of facts pure and simple. 

Oil Creek in Pennsylvania had 
flowed just as it does now for count- 
less generations previous to 1859. A 
black, peculiarly smelling substance had 
oozed out of the ground and, floating 
upon its surface, was carried to the 
Gulf of Mexico in search of its Beau- 
mont cousin. Indians gathered the 
foul-smelling stuff and sold it for me- 
dicinal purposes. Time rolled on and 
Eastern civilization developed a need. 
Then Nature raised up a man with an 
idea, and clothed him with courage and 
energy. And Col. Drake left his New 
England home for the then wilds of 
Pennsylvania, and after many discour- 
agements, but firm in his convictions, 
he finished the first oil well on the 
banks of Oil Creek. 

There were days of depressions, 
years of uncertainty, but men worked 
on and the industry finally made 
Pennsylvania rich; it produced great 
men, vast fortunes and astounded the 
world. "Years after a grateful people 
raised a magnificent monument to the 
memory of the discoverer of oil. 

Kern River rushed down the deep 
canyons, through the low lands to Bu- 
ena Vista lake, countless generations 
ago. It was gushing in its usual way, 
and not unlike the waters of Oil Creek, 
when Drake began earning the reputa- 
tion of being a lunatic. A dark browti 
sand cropped out along the bank and 
Farmer Means observed that some- 
times a queer, greasy fluid oozed out 
and floated down the river. Like old 
John Ormsby, who sold clothes-lines 
to pay the taxes on a worthless farm 
because he "knowed" there was "ile" 
under it, Means stuck to it that he was 
living in the presence of a great oil 
basin. Old John Ormsby plead with 
moneyed men to drill his farm, and 
they did, but didn't get anything. 
They drilled again with the same re- 
sult. But John kept on selling clothes- 
lines and paying taxes. Finally a big 
well was struck, and John became sud- 
denly rich. And thus in perseverance 
rewarded^ 

Farmer Means "knowed" there was 
oil under his place, but he couldn't 
find the right man to go after it. 

California continued to grow; com- 
mercial and manufacturing industries 
increased; fuel was scarce and expen- 
sive; in its natural course the time ar- 
rived. The Great Ruler of the Uni- 
verse unlocked the mystery. 

In 1899 Joe Elwood, like Col. Drake, 
was pursuing his peaceful way in other 





parts, when Opportunity knocked and 
whispered to him. He hitched up his 
team and started across country from 
Jiis Sanger ranch for Kern county. 
He inspected the asphaltum beds at 
McKittrick and started on his return. 
He had seen enough at McKittrick to 
cause him to dream dreams of second 
editions of Drake and "Coal Oil John- 
ny." He was impressed with the simi- 
larity of conditions among the hills 
above Bakersfield and those at McKit- 
trick and concluded to make an inves- 
tigation. With a Drake definiteness 
of purpose, he set about to open up 
the great Kern River field. 

Finding it necessary to go to San 



Cement Reservoir in Kern River District. 

Francisco on business Elwood ar- 
ranged with his brother to visit the 
Means property and report to him. 
The brother approached Means on a 
pretense of wanting a wood contract, 
and gradually turned the conversation 
to the subject of oil. Mr. Means was 
at once communicative and gave El- 
wood all the information at hand. He 
showed where gas was escaping from 
the ground and where he had dug out 
cil sand in constructing a water ditch. 
Means was anxious that some one 
should prospect his property, and El- 
wood and his father began excavating 
where the exposure of sand had been 
discovered. They found a sand satu- 



rated with oil, but about this time 
trouble came. It was May, and the 
hot weather melted the snow in the 
mountains and caused the river to 
rise quickly, flooding the hole. After 
this the prospectors began to sink a 
shaft on the bluff, thirty or forty feet 
above the river. Joe Elwood now re- 
turned and recognizing, as he believed, 
a good thing, proceeded to locate pub- 
lic lands.' The hole was dug down to 
a depth of forty-three feet when the 
oil sand was reached. The sand being 
lose L it became necessary to curb the 
rest of the way down. Gas came into 
the hole, making it dangerous for the 
workmen, and "machinery" was ob- 




A Pumping Jack in the Kern River Field. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tamed and the well "bored" to the 
depth oi seventy-five (eet, seven feet 
deeper than the old Drake well. The 
dole begin to fill with oil and drilling 
he oil raised to 
within twe: the suriacc, and 

the great Kern River oil field 
discovered." 

• >od was clever enough to appre- 
hc evidently had a good 
m Mr. Means the 
■ing document: 
"Whereas, Jon id, and J. 

if prospect- ' 
ing for oil. gas or minerals on th< 

• i Kern River three 

ri Township Twenty nine 
Range Twenty-eighl 
belonging to T. A Mean-, it is agreed 
that they arc aNowed the exclusive 
right to do so for the period oi nine- 
ty-nine years irom date on the fol- ; 
lowing ten hat they pay all 

expenses of boring, developing and 
tankage of said product (in 
enough he found) and the division, 
shall be a follows, to wit: One-fourth 
to said Means and Three-fourths to 
the above named Elwo 

THOMAS MEANS. 
"JONATHAN KI.WOOD. 
"J. M KI.WOOD. 
Kern River. Kern County, Cal.. 
May 25. 1809." 

Means had been fair with the El- 
woods, and they in turn showed con- 
sideration ior him. Klwood subse- 
quently said: "Undoubtedly, we could 
have made the conditions less favor- 
able to Mr Means, and assuredly, if he 
had been as 'wise' as a few years' edu- 
cation in an oil excitement makes a 
man, he could have made the condi- 
tions so onerous to us that we would 
not have been able to fulfill them at 
all. As it was. Mr. Means got a very 
fair bargain, and we, who were not 
able to go ahead and drill a number of 
wells, and fully develop the property, 
would have been completely left out." 
When land was selling as high as 
$7,000 an acre doubt was expressed as 
to the value of the Means lease, but 
the best legal talent has pronounced 
it good. 

The first Kern River well drilled un- 
der contract was put down by Milton 



!>. but his 
roachu 
unable to get b< 

a go< . 

payinf fol 
The news spread like wildfire and 

irom all parts oi the world. 

The Elwoods never :■■-: their '■ 
but !■ 

day t' ibly "fixed." and 

when the writer sought an interview 

with t: i »rake. 

uld not tin, I linn becau 

'resident Roosevelt, likes to hunt 



men oi wealth and men without .1 
-icnced drillers and men 
didn't auger: 

from all parts oi the earth And it is 
bat with.,: 

ked in with the men 
They usually do. In a ihort time it 

almost impossible to sec 
man on the streets field— 

the r '.omen stave. I at home 

and the other cl 

The railr • impelled to put 

mi extra trains to accommodate the 





William KUery and II. II Mood, Prominent Operators in the 
Kern River Field. 



kersfield-Fresno Company, the El- 
wood Oil Company and the Kern River 
Oil Company, besides owning much 
valuable land, from which he derives a 
royalty. He has an income that will 
keep the wolf from the door probably 
the rest of his life, he makes his home 
in Bakersfield. 

THE OIL EXCITEMENT. 

From a quiet little village Bakers- 
field, in a few months, became a bus- 
tling city. Hundreds of thousands of 
dollars were brought here for invest- 
ment in the new oil field. The hotels 
were soon overtaxed, boarding houses 
were rushed up. prices jumped to the 
top notch, everything was on the 
move. Men of all classes, conditions 



travel. Machinery could not be shipped 
in fast enough to supply the demand. 
Men went mad in their eagerness to 
get drilling outfits and paid exorbitant 
prices. Dealers made money hand over 
fist, and as a result Bakersfield soon 
boasted of ten oil well supply con- 
cerns. Derricks began blossoming on 
the sand hills above the river like 
morning glories before the early sun. 
Eight, ten and twelve horse teams be- 
came a familiar sight. A railroad to 
Kern River was built, Bakersfield was 
given electric street cars, paved streets, 
a dozen handsome brick buildings, and 
the oil excitement was at its full 
height. 

Saloons sprung up thicker than 
hops, houses of shady reputation were 



but be it 

■ 

c out 

1 he conditions in some (respects 
Id, but in others they 

id weather, but there 

Itely, in the beginning, the 
were men 
wholly unfamiliar with the oil bus: 
The formation was not under- 

exceedingly difficult. 
Men were ., mutagen 

I to think 
their chief t.tisin 
wear a line quality ot kid kIov, 

and draw the I ■ sible 

-alary. Workmen wen employed as 
drillers who were absolutely inexperi- 
■ need, and the result was that hun- 
dreds of thousands oi dollars were 
squandered in Kern River. Dozen of 
wells were lost that ought to have 
made good producei 
"went broke" that should have made 
big money; corporations arc still in 
debt that might have long since been 
paying large divii 

country history, and is one of the nec- 
essary parts of the business. 

In an incredibl ice of time 

land was taken up for miles around 
and the fellow who appeared on the 
scene fifteen months after the Elwoods 
dug their river bank well found he 
was just a little too late. 

Geologists and scientific men rushed 
in with explanations and advice where 
practical men feared to venture guess 
cs. They had the country on tiptoe 
with their marvelous statements. They 
knew what was on the earth, over the 
earth, under the earth and in the earth. 
But the practical oil man said nothing, 
and punched holes into the ground, 
satisfied that when it comes to oil one 
man can see as far into the earth as 
another. 

Among the first to arrive on the 
scene were H. H. Blood, John A. 
Bunting, Tim Spellacy, Charlie Can- 
field. J. B. Treadwell and E. L. Do- 
heny, and all became rich. 

It required months for even expe- 




"> 



Wells and Tankage of the West Shore Oil Company, Kern River Fields. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



33tf 



66* 



Surface 



W////(h/f////////ffi////////f//i 



MtM H *+ W , H »4 V ,* r„ .Wt tn , 



'-»-•'., ... ■■ A.,. VmJi 




Earthy 

Grave 
and Dr-y,5a 



Water§an. 
50 Ft 

Dry Sand 15 



JWaterJSand 
50 Ft. 



Soj+eiay 15' 

Light Oil - 
Sand £5F. 

Blue Clay 

16 Ft, 
Li^+Oil- 
Sand27Ft 



Very v\t\\ 
Oil Sam} 
103 Feet. 



Clay a Ffi 
Good Oil- 
Sand 1 6 Ft. 

leiay 1 5 Ft 



Good Oil- 
Sand 50? 



C lay 10 Ft. 
\Je\y r\o\\ 
OilSandstf 

Clay 8,0 Ft 

© 



Log of Well No. of the Sterling 
Oil Company. 




Oil from Well No. i Sovereign Oil Co., E. E. Burt and H. H. Blood in Foreground. 



rienced Eastern operators to under- 
stand the new conditions here exist- 
ing. The oil, instead of being found 
in a hard rock formation, as in the 
East, was taken from a loose, moving 
sand, and instead of being light, 32 to 
47 degrees, like the Eastern oils, it 
was thick and tarlike, varying from 11 
to 18 degrees. In some parts of the 
field there was gas, but generally its 
absence was more noticeable. 

What was the oil good for? How 
was it going to be pumped? How 
could it be marketed? These were 
questions time would have to solve. 

It was claimed that Kern River 
wells found 200, 300 and 400 feet of 
sand, that the saturation was so much, 
and that in one hundred years they 
would produce so many barrels of oil. 
It was said that with so great an 
amount of sand and such heavy oil wa- 
ter would do no harm. Men lost 
their reason in their excitement and 
heedlesly plunged ahead. There was 
no end to the great resources of 
Kern River - . Generations hence these 
same . wells would be pumping more 
oil than now. 

Wells were abandoned with no effort 
to. shut off the water. Expenses were 
scoffed at. All the luxuries were en- 
joyed. 

At first it required from three 
months to a year to put down a well, 
and in. fact, some of those begun in the 
early stages are still unfinished. Drill- 
ers soon commanded as high as $10 
a day and board and could not be had 
even at that. 

That was two years and a half ago. 
Times have changed since then. Kern 
River has settled down to an estab- 
lished basis. The boom days are over. 
It has been -found that experience 
counts for something; that kid gloves 
do not make an oil man. that Kern 
River must be carefully managed to 
supply the future demand for oil, that 
water is a serious thing on an oil sand, 
that a month under favorable condi- 



tions is sufficient time for drilling a 
well. In short, Kern kiver has en- 
tered upon the second period reterred 
to early in tins story, and the future is 
more hopeful. 

DEVELOPMENT OF THE FIELD. 

The summer of 1900 and the follow- 
ing winter witnessed the greatest 
strides in the development 01. Kern 
River. The merry clank of the jars 
and the tuneful song 01 the walking- 
beam were to be heard in every part 
of the field. During this period land 
sold at fabulous prices,. $5, 000, an acre 
being realized in some instances, and 
even more is reported to have been 
paid. Hundreds of companies were 
incorporated and stock in some cases 
was sold where the company did not 
own a single foot of territory or hold 
even a lease. In street vernacular the 
game was worked with a vengeance. 
The experiences of old Pithole were 
revived. Ridiculous royalties were 
paid, often 30, 40 and even 50 per cent. 
Wells were drilled as fast as men and 
material could be secured. Befo.re 
Christmas, or eighteen months after 
the digging of the Elwood well, there 
were 250 completed producing wells in 
the Kern River district, and during 
1900, 919,275 barrels of oil were shipped 
out of Bakersfield. There were fully 
150 wells drilling and interest was un- 
abated. So quickly did men take up 
the craze and push the promotion busi- 
ness that the east and west, boundaries 
of the field were soon defined, but the 
northern and southern limits are still 
in doubt. When the conditions are 
better understood and drillers learn 
how to reach great depths, 2,000 and 
3,000 feet, at moderate cost, the aban- 
doned northern and southern part of 
Kern River may become profitable 
drilling territory. In fact, it is almost 
certain, we are willing to venture, that 
the day is not far distant when men 
will be glad to operate the deep ter- 
ritory. That time will come when the 



production of the present field drCps 
off and the supply is not equal to the 
demand. Within the defined limits of 
Kern River a dry hole or duster has 
never been drilled, which is quite a 
notable fact concerning oil fields. 

The field activities ot 1900 continued 
until March, 1901, the shipments of oil 
rapidly increasing during this time. 
But early in the year it began to be re- 
alized that a great deal more oil was 
being produced than conisumed, and 
there being no prospect of a market 
operators began to "go' slow" and af- 
ter ' March but little new work was 
commenced. By July there was a gen- 
eral shut-down, and with the exception 
of certain assessment, work and a given 
amount of drilling required by two or 
three companies to keep up with large 
contracts, the field has been at a stand- 
still ever since — a year and a half. 

Altogether there have been 575 wells 
drilled in Kern river, representing an 
expenditure of probably $8,000,000. 
Few wells cost under $4,000, and many 
cost that amount multiplied several 
times. It has often been said and 
never denied that the Century well 
(never completed) on section 24, cost 
$72,000. The Shasta on 14, the Thistle, 
the Commonwealth,' the Defiance, Min- 
erals and a number of other wells each 
cost fair-sized fortunes in themselves. 
Any number of wells cost $10,000 to 
$15,000. While 600 wells have been 
successfully drilled, more than 100 
were never completed, and these were 
the most costly ventures, as above 
noted. On section 24, 28-27, above 
thirteen holes were abandoned, and 
not a successful well drilled. Section 
23 has six marked against it; 14 in 
28-27 has 9; 12 and 7 in the same 
range and township have three each; 
sections 18,, 10 and 20, 28-28, have 11, 7 
olid 5 respectively, while in 29-28 sec- 
tions 7 and 8 each have eight, besides 
many others which, to mention, would 
become tedious reading. 

The largest number of producing 








. RI-. 


















many d 




i others 




. doubt 


be Mid. all w 












1 urn to 








e sand dips so 








: been 








rth far 




it. and 


Ken 



«. c 

nia I 
lina 2, 
non 3. 



I 
4. Linda 



Richmond 2 



in Joaquin 

fourth in order 

Pacific Rail- 

■rds of this 

ta Fe 

.IS SUI 



er of light 
oil. 

PIPE LINKS 
TR 

•nents of oil out of Kern 

Rivrr in loco amount. ; bar- 

: !>arrcls or 

month. The total pro- 

i of the field during thnt year 

i .000.000 barn-Is Con- 

dity of thi 

ict that tl 

wholly unprepared for oil 



did with 
come to 



lat ncid Mas never 
no on 

constantly 
r operators 



I, when li since, 

producing i sparkling 

m as one i to see — ol 

Another company in another 

il the field has : IC fx . 

Two 

Is wire pumping 200 

This afternoon the 

that they arc n ng 50 bar- 

il sand has 

- rious problem. 

It is safe to say thai Kern River 

1 will not aver- 



holdings of the Pa- 
The fol- 
iird turned 
r as possessing 
is in the State, 
were all kinds of ru- 
in the air. The questi" 

come a serious 

i company could 

not furnish number of cars. 

1 charged, the tariff 

exorbitant. What was to 

:>c? the operators were asking of 

each other. 

In this dark hour the news that the 

■ r*3 Oil Company would build an 

pipe line to the coast and erect 

nt Richmond one of the largest 

refineries in the world, came like a 

nd to the producers of Kern 

They I nicer tales 

ic and all- devouring 

e looking for a 

deliverer and it didn't make much dif- 

■■ to them what kind of a cloak 

re. 

fmri he Standard purchased 




Oil Flowing'from the Well of the Won Oil Company, Sunset District. 



vclopment Company owns the rest of 
the section with 25 wells. 

Fifth comes Section 32, 28-28. There 
are 57 wells on this division, the larg- 
est number, 17, being owned by the 
Peerless. The rest are Green & 
Whittier 8, Queen Esther 3, Gross- 
mayer I, Bear Flag 2, Senator 7, Sov- 
ereign 4. Sterling 8, Vesta 4, Hanford- 
Sanger 2. 

Section 30, 28-28. with 47 is next in 
order. Green & Whittier I, Mt. Di- 
ablo 2. Amazon 2. Nevada County 3, 
Indiana 2, Euclid 3. Globe 6, Toltec 4, 
Moneta 3. Hawkeye State 3, Irma I, 
Bald Eagle Con. 1, American Eagle 
1. Bald Eagle 1. Chicago Crude 7. Ori- 
ent 3. Kern Oil 2. Jacalitas 2. 

Section 33. 28-28. has 37 wells, owned 
by the Imperial (is) and Thirty-three 
(22). 

Section 28. 28-2S. is the only other 
division having over 25 wells. It has 
35 as follows: Reed Crude 14. Comet 
7. British California 5, Petroleum Cen- 
ter 4, Kern River 2. California Mu- 
tual 1. Kern Oil 2. 



transportation, this showing was quite 
remarkable. But during the following 
year there was a large increase in 
shipments. In January the shipments 
amounted to 158,250 barrels. Four 
months later they had increased to 
218,850 barrels in May and to 400,- 
000 in December, or in round numbers 
3.000.000 barrels for the entire year, 
representing a total production of 
practically 4,000.000 barrels, taking 
into consideration the local consump- 
tion, by evaporation, loss, etc. 

During 1902 the production has av- 
iged over 1,250,000 barrels a month, 
with only a portion of the wells pro- 
ducing. The possibilities of the field 
at the" present time being approximate- 
ly 2,000,000 barrels a month. How 
long it could maintain the output is 

iionable. While it is impossible 
estimate the possible production, 

ig to the peculiar conditions, it is 

known that the wells will not hold 
up as was expected. The best illustra- 
tion of this is the Monte Cristo. With 

13 wells it is not producing any 



age 100 barrels. If they will not, with 
the largely increased demands, the 
augmented facilities, such as pipe lines 
and refineries will occasion, will ne- 
cessitate the drawing upon Sunset 
stocks or the constant drilling of new 
wells in Kern River. But Kern River 
will be doing proudly if it averages 50 
barrels per well, which, figuring on a 
basis of 600 producing wells, will give 
a production of 10,950.000 barrels, a 
very liberal estimate. 

Kern River cannot maintain its 
present production without the con- 
stant drilling of new wells, but this 
must be expected; it will tend to make 
better times than otherwise for the oil 
country. 

It is a notable fact that the Stand- 
ard Oil Company never develops new 
territory. It wisely leaves the pros- 
pecting to the venturesome and when 
good properties are developed, it buys 
them at a fair price. In 1900 the oil 
business had reached such proportions 
as to "look good" to the .Standard, 
and that fall the big corporation 



] a large tract of land in the northeast 
corner of section 7, 29-29, and: began 
the erection there of numerous 35,000- 
barrel iron tanks, and as fast as they 
were completed they were filled with 
oil. Nearly eighty of these tanks have 
been completed, and it is understood 
all of them are full of oil. The present 
storage capacity of the Standard at 
Tank City is 128,562,500 gallons and 
three immense concrete reservoirs of 
75,000 barrels capacity each are in 
course of construction. 

As quickly as material could be pro- 
cured in the east the laying of the 
pipe from Kern River to Point Rich- 
mond was commenced and the erection 
of the refinery at that place was be- 
gun. Under favorable circumstances 
oil will be transported through this 
line by the middle of next March. 

The oil, which is too heavy for pipe- 
line transportation in its natural state, 
will be heated and forced on its way by 
immense pumps. The pumping sta- 
tions, which at regular intervals now 
dot the valley, are nearly all com- 



k/ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



pleted. The Standard has expended 
nearly $3,000,000 in this work, thus 
showing their confidence in the field. 

In addition to the Standard's tank- 
age the different producing companies 
of Kern river have a combined storage 
of more than 1,000,000 barrels. Next 
to the Standard the Southern Pacific 
and the Union have the largest tank- 
age. Others are the Monte Crista, San 
Joaquin, Reed Crude, Kern Oil, Im- 
perial, Revenue, Thirty-three, West 
Shore, Peerless, Sterling, Canfield, 
Globe, Red Bank, Chicago Crude, Tol- 
tec, Aztec, and Vesta. 

There are nearly 35 miles of pipe line 
in the field, 10, 8, and 6-inch lines, be- 
longing largely to the btandard. . The 
amount of pipe line will no doubt 
double during the next year, but the 
tankage capacitv when the work now 
under way is finished, will be nearly 
sufficient for the needs of the field'. 
REFINERIES. 

Webster tells us that history abounds 
in false facts; an accepted truth today 
may be the laughing stock c' tomor- 



Ring Refining Company is building 
a 300 barrel plant on the Alladin prop- 
erty. 

These alone during the next year 
will consume large quantities of the 
crude product. It will thus be seen that 
rapid progress has been made during 
the past twelve months, and the oil 
business is now in a more encouraging, 
condition, and in a firmer and more 
permanent basis than ever before. 
THE COMBINE. 

When the slump came in the summer 
of 1901, the great problem was: "What 
shall we do?" For weeks and months 
there were all kinds of rumors of a 
combine. About this time the Standard 
announced its plans and then it became 
a question of Standard and Anti- 
Standard. 

The combine question was discussed 
pro and con at great length through 
the newspapers, upon the streets, in 
the derricks — everywhere two or three 
oil men were found together it was a 
pretty sure gamble what the topic of 
conversation was. Opinion was greatly 



pany, as owner of the land, collect a 
royalty from the following companies: 
Knob Hill, Grossmayer, Kern Oil and 
Development, Jacalitas, Orient, and 
Irma, the owners of 18 wells. It will 
thus be seen that out of 575 wells the 
Combine owns 198 and collects royalty 
from 18, less than one-third hi the 
field. 

Many of these Companies did not 
join the movement in the beginning, 
but have been taken in during the year. 
The Combine, like the average poli- 
tician, entered the field with marvelous 
promises, but it is a noteworthy fact 
that it has failed to keep any of them. 
Instead of creating a market and mak- 
ing a price for the oil, one of its first 
acts was to reduce the price of oil and 
quotations rapidly decreased until oil 
was selling as low as 10 cents a barrel. 
As a result, conditions in the field be- 
came demoralized. Operations were 
at a stand-still and the Combine came 
in for a full measure of censure. In- 
stead of helping matters, it soon be- 
came evident that the Combine had 



Combine is today in the same predic- 
ament that every organization of its 
kind has found itself when attempting 
to compete with the Standard without 
its own pipe-line or other transporta- 
tion facilities under its control. 

For several weeks the air has been 
full of strange rumors concerning the 
collapse of the Combine. It is said that 
those who have been announced as 
part of the organization are really not 
a part of if, that their property has 
never been deeded over, that the Com- 
bine has not kept its promis.es, that they 
are about to withdraw. Dissatisfaction 
has been heard from many sources, and 
what the fate of the Combine will be 
is still very largely problematical. 

In the meantime the Standard is for- 
tifying itself, making many contracts 
with producers and filling orders of 
consumers with characteristic prompt- 
ness. The transportation and market- 
ing of California oil must necessarily 
be an evolution and years of experience 
count for much. In this respect the 
Standard is able to give the Combine 




Wells of the Occidental Oil Company, Sunset District. 



row. When Milton McWhorter as- 
serted in 1900 that he could make a fine 
illuminating oil out of the Kenl Crude 
people laughed at him. About this 
time the writer received a letter from 
Dr. Chauncey Forward, the well-known 
Cleveland refiner, stating that he had 
made a number of extended tests with 
Kern River oil and was highly pleased 
with the results. In many respects Dr. 
Forward stated he had never had better 
results with any oil. It is le:^ than three 
years since people smiled incredulous- 
ly at Milton McWhorter, but today the 
Standard is erecting one of the largest 
refineries in the world at Point Rich- 
mond, and four new refineries are in 
operation at Bakersfield. They are 
the Pacific, 900 barrels a day capacity; 
the Union, 900 barrels; the Clark, 300 
barrels; and the Vulcan, 100 barrels. 
At Sunset the Jewett and Blodgett re- 
finery handles 300 barrels daily. 

The Mercedes Oil Company is build- 
ing an asphalt refinery on the lands of 
the Arizona Western Company and the 



divided. 

W. S. Porter of Los Angeles placed 
himself at the head of the combine 
forces and prosecuted his plans with 
consummate skill. For a time it 
looked as ff the scheme would fail. 
Then it was announced that the merg- 
ing of the interests would take place 
January 1, 1902, the plan being for 
those who entered to deed over their 
entire holdings to the combine and 
accept as payment stocks and bonds. 

The following named companies 
joined the movement, representing 
some of the best property in the field, 
and a total of 198 wells: San Joaquin, 
Blinn, Gold Standard, Aztec, Wolver- 
ine, Red Bank, Central Point Consol- 
idated, Reed Crude, Kern Oil, Comet, 
Omar, Green & Whittier, Queen Es- 
ther, Bear Flag, Senator, Sycamore, 
Mt. Diablo, Chicago Crude, Hawkeye 
State, Moneta, Toltec, Missouri, Ver- 
non, Bolina, Hecla, Alva, Canfield, 
Section Five, Cortez. In addition to 
this the Combine, or Associated Corn- 



done . a great deal of harm to the in- 
dustry. It came into competition with 
the Standard, but was in no way able 
to compete with its competitor. En- 
ormous salaries were paid to the offi- 
cers of the Association, ranging from 
$12,000 a year down, and companies 
which had been before paying divi- 
dends now found their profits gone. 

The Association opened palatial offi- 
ces in San Francisco and began nego- 
tiating for its share of the retail busi- 
ness. It found itself in the same di- 
lemma that many of the small pro- 
ducers were in, being unable to secure 
cars for the transportation of its oil 
from the fields and consequently un- 
able to fill its contracts as promptly as 
they should be filled. 

Next, it was announced that the 
Combine wqjild construct a pipe-line 
to the coast and the president is said 
to have gone east for the purpose of 
negotiating the sale of bonds to raise 
sufficient funds, but if this were true, 
the mission proved a failure and the 



cards and spades and beat them out. 
It will be interesting to note the pro- 
gress of the Combine when the Stan- 
dard gets its pipe-line and refinery at 
Point Richmond into operation. It is 
freely predicted that in the end the 
Combine will either collapse or pass 
into the control of the Standard. 
SUNSET AND MIDWAY. 

Fortunately for Sunset and Midway 
Kern County operators acquired ex- 
perience before doing much in these 
districts, and the result is that drilling 
here has been conducted much more 
carefully than it was at Kern River, 
and there is little fear of damage to 
property by reason of water. 

It is not necessary at this time to 
say where Sunset and Midway are — 
the world already knows that. Suffi- 
cient to recall that Sunset is one of the 
oldest districts in the state. Here the 
asphaltum beds come to the surface, 
and here for years the Jewett & Blod- 
get refinery has been reducing the 
crude asphaltum for the market and 






PACIFIC OIL RRPORTKR 



'3 



■ 

had av 
erablc ; in the 



■ i ihc 



make it difficult for the driver to 

retire a high perch to 

1 and 
nature 

Drilling began near the Jewett & 

nded in all 

directions, but it found that 

the ci the fuel was over the 

hills toward McKittriclt, and thai the 

where the crop. 



men i- that 

run the best firlo 

will I 

is entirely diffi i 
lound at Bakersfield, b 
pebbly, the delight • 

ound in the Cresus well and 
Tim. Spellacy is it he 

carries a quantity ol it in Ins p 
to make ether oil men look sorry. 



. the 

■i any 

port- 

iil are now 
being n McKittrick. as IiirIi 

somel i day, The Stan- 

Hani : 



or cheap- 
•irld or Sunset. 

MAKING \ MARKET. 

s ol Kern 
• ! still for 
1 market. 
h of the indust: 

cmarkablc 
fuel oil has 
But to 
build i permanent market and ; 

the handling ol the product 
|uirei knowledge 

give undue credit, it 
must : d that the 

impany the 
> do with the 

V yi nl Report- 

tioo, remarked: 

in S.m 1 liicli is the 

main market ior oil, there is yet to he 

ingle tank of capacity equal 

to the demands of the producing 




Wells of the Miiricopa Oil Company, Sunset District. 



pings were found. It was also discov- 
OIL NINE 

ered that instead of a pool the Sunset 
field was a long river-like belt, in the 
east, termed a sucker-rod belt, and 
many hold to the opinion it will yet be 
proved to extend from McKittrick, fol- 
lowing the hills around to Sunset to 
Kern River, but this is now only spec- 
ulation. 

However, there is little doubt as to 
the continuation of the fuel to McKit- 
trick. Sunset and Midway are practi- 
cally one field, and operations are edg- 
ing toward McKittrick. Much of the 
Sunset —Midway oil fs lighter gravity 
than Kern River, and more flowing 
wells have been drilled here. It is im- 
possible to estimate the production of 
these wells as they have been plugged 
as last as drilled. The average at Sun- 
set is i.ooo feet, at Midway. 1,100 feet. 
To the present time 136 wells have 
been successfully drilled, while many 
failures have been recorded. Some of 
the Sunset Midway wells were expen- 
sive ventures and will require consid- 
erable time with a good market to pay 



Sunset presents to the would-be pro- j 
ducer the best opportunities to be found 
anywhere in the state today. Likely 
territory, in fact as sure as undrilled 
land can be, is obtainable here on more 
reasonable terms than elsewhere, but 
this condition will not long exist, for 
as soon as the world begins to make 
demands upon this field for fuel the 
price of property will advance. A 20- 
acre piece of land admirably located 
may be bought for $1,000, providing a 
well is put down at once. This same 
piece of territory in Kern River would 
bring at least $1,500 an acre. The land 
upon which the Cresus is located, six 
months ago was offered to the writer 
for $250 an acre. Sunset holds out 
splendid opportunities today at mod- 
erate figures. 

Early in January of the present year 
the Sunset Railway was opened for 
traffic, solving the question of trans- 
portation and connecting the field with 
the outside world. For a long time 
the lack of water was a great hindrance 
to the development of the district, but' 
ih, laving mi' a water line settled the 



thawing upon its stocks. 

It is instructive to observe the pos- 
sibilities of Kern County properties 
when carefully, systematically, and ju- 
diciously managed. A little over a year 
ago the Dabney Oil Company of Mc- 
Kittrick was apparently hopelessly em- 
barrassed. The two largest creditors 
were the National Supply Company and 
the Herron Company. After vain at- 
tempts to collect, Messrs. C. B. Barnes 
of the National, and R. H. Herron 
iool. possession of th'e property, con- 
ducted its affairs in a business-like way 
fixed up the wells and increased the 
production, and in a few months paid 
oil something like $20,000 indebtedness 
ami turned over the property again, 
clear of debt and in first-class condi- 
11 .11 

McKittrick is now the smallest field 
in the county, having about 50 produc- 
ing wells. There are no remarkable 
producers here, but the wells thus far 
drilled have proved good _paying in- 
vestments in most eases. The most ex- 
pensive drilling was in the Capt. Lacy 
well, which cost $20,000. As a rule, 



fields." This fact held back the pro- 
gress of the business in Kern County. 
It was inevitable that unless the in - 
dustry developed in all its branches 
equally with the production, field op- 
erations must suffer. It was not until 
the Standard manifested its confidence, 
and began large undertakings at the 
seaboard that there was immediate 
hope for improvement. As soon as the 
supply exceeded the demand on the 
I transportation facilities, work in the 
fields had to cease, and for a year and 
over there have been "hard times" in 
oildom. It is difficult to say what 
would have been the condition, or what 
would have been done had not the 
Standard stepped in and erected its city 
of storage tanks and laid the founda- 
tions for a permanent market. It is 
now nearly ready to open its Point 
Richmond refinery # and operate its pipe- 
fine; it has big contracts for oil; it is 
daily creating new demands for fuel of 
this character; it is buying large quan- 
tities and is paying cash for all the oil 
it takes. The result is many compan- 
ies have been saved, even during a low 



6/ 



14 



PACIFC OIL REPORTER 



market. Now, with its plans nearly all 
completed, a better price is being off- 
ered for oil, and an advancing market 
causes a better feeling. Two months 
ago the prevailing price was 10 cents; 
now it is 25; then everybody was blue 
and dejected, now all are bouyant and 
hopeful; then few wells were pump- 
ing, and nothing was doing in the field, 
now nearly all of the Kern River wells 
are pumping and operations are pick- 
ing up,, with indications of a general 
resumption of business. 

California oil has passed the experi- 
mental stage. The boom days are 
over. The industry is now on a per- 
manent basis, and must necessarily 
henceforth be one if not the chief en- 
terprise of its state. Millions of dol- 
lars are invested and some of the 
shrewdest men of the country are at 
the helm. 

OIL COUNTRY CHARACTERS. 

The oil country has developed some 
remarkable men. As war brings out 
the talent for generalship, so oil ex- 
citements bring out the true character- 
istics of many men who by chance or. 
otherwise are concerned in it. It may 
be luck, it may be genius, but that mat- 
ters little to the oil greaser who gets 
a "reputation" in "ile." Many a man 
too poor to pay railroad fare has 
walked into the midst of an oil excite- 
ment and ridden out in a palace-car. 
But such men were men of daring, men 
who had nothing to lose and every- 
thing to win. Kern River has produced 
her share of notable characters. 

John Enos belonged to that class of 
men who refuse to open the door when 
opportunity knocks. He was the own- 
er of Section 6, in Kern River when the 
excitement broke out and he is the 
owner of it yet and probably will be 
so long as he lives. During the palmy 
days it seemed quite a certainty that 
Enos's property was in the direct line 
o[ the oil belt and there were a dozen 
millionares who would have given half 
a kingdom to get possession of it. 
They tried all manner of schemes to 
induce Enos to sell, but to no avail. 
He was obdurate. He would not listen. 



He would not talk. Men of money 
employed the most clever promoters 
they could find to exercise their powers 
upon the silent Portuguese, but it was 
no use. They offered him $100,000 for 
his holdings, but he neither smiled or 
said nay. He simply looked at them 
and maintained silence. He gave no 
excuse. He kept away from the scene 
of excitement. He conducted himself 
like a diplomat, but showed none of 




Colonel Tim Spellacy. 

$200,000 for his property, ' but John 
Enos was not affected. Then they 
offered him $300,000, but he turned 
from the would-be purchaser without 
a word and walked away. 

"Why," £aid a promoter to the 
writer, "I offered him $320,000 for his 
land and he simply looked at me. He 
did not even reply to me. I thought 
the characteristics of a shrewd finan- 
cier. By and by they offered him 
perhaps he did not believe that I had 



the money, so I asked him to go with 
me to the bank and see if my check 
was not good for the amount. He only 
looked me in the face and maintained 
his silence, while great beads of per- 
spiration came on my forehead as I 
tried to hypnotize him. I drew a word 
picture of him as a prince back in his 
native land with a castle and a yacht 
and fine horses and all the luxuries of 
a king, but it did not phase him." 

Enos owns the land yet and, as we 
have already said, he probably always 
will own it. For before many months 
it was discovered that the oil ran out 
before it reached Section 6, and the 
land owned by John Enos so far as 
oil purposes are concerned is not 
worth the place it occupies on the map. 
The men who cursed John Enos two 
years ago, today are thanking their 
lucky stars that the silent, little Por- 
tuguese did not know a good thing 
when he saw it. 

Probably the most popular man and 
uniquest character that has appeared 
upon the scene since the discovery of 
oil in Kern River is the genial, whole- 
hearted Colonel lim Spellacy. Per- 
haps his mother called him Timothy, 
but the boys call him "Tim," and if he 
has an enemy in the world he has never 
made himself known. If Tim Spellacy 
three years ago did not walk home 
from the Klondyke, it was because the 
ocean was not frozen over. At any 
rate, he struck Bakersfield on his up- 
pers, but such a trivial matter is only 
an incident in the life of a man like 
Colonel Tim Spellacy. In a short 
time he was engaged in the oil well 
supply business. Then he became one 
of the promoters of the Chicago Crude. 
Next, he was in the Monte Cristo. 
Then the leading spirit in the Mascot. 
Then the organizer of the Illinois 
Crude, now in the Croesus, and no one 
knows how many other companies. 
But if he makes a million in Kern Riv- 
er, everyone will agree that he deserves 
it all. There is no other Tim Spellacy 
in the world. There never was another, 
there never will be. Wherever he goes 
he spreads sunshine. Wherever he has 
been he has left men feeling that they 



were better because he had been there, 
and if some morning Tim Spellacy 
should be missing and Saint Peter 
should find an illegible name in the 
register and should ask if there were 
an Irishman present from Bakersfield, 
California, Tim Spellacy would be sure 
to speak out and say, "Yis sor, that's 
me." 

The only mean thing that Tim Spel- 
lacy was ever known to do was to call 
Mr. Hay "Secretary Alfalfa," but we 
have the assurance of the Administra- 
tion that he has long since been for- 
given. 

"Heads I win, tails I lose," ex- 
claimed C. S. Young, as he flipped up 
a dollar to decide the question of the 
purchase of Section 31, when Kern 
River was in its infancy. Tails came up 
and Young from that 'day to this has 
been bewailing his ill-luck. Section 31 
has since proved one of the most valu- 
able tracts in the Kern River field. It 
is estimated to be worth from three 
to four million dollars and Young lost 
it by one dollar. 

It was this way: There was much 
speculation as to which course the oil 
belt would take, whether over the hills 
or down the flats. Young did not know. 
Neither did anybody else. He had been 
told by "expert" oil men that the oil 
veins generally followed the hills, but 
a friend attempted to induce him to 
take Section 31. He was undecided, 
but finally concluded to let fate decide 
the matter and with the ease of a vet- 
eran gambler he tossed up a dollar, 
exclaiming, "Heads I win; tails. I 
lose." He took Section 9 and lost. 
Section 9 proved unprofitable, while 
Section 31, as is now well known, 
brought in some magnificent wells. 

Young has had a score of hairbreadth 
escapes and still lives. He swells up 
with pride, however, when he is re- 
minded that he does not belong to the 
same class of Portuguese obstinance as 
John Enos. But Young got hold of 
some good lands in Kern River, and 
for more than a year he has been bask- 
ing in the warm sunshine of Easy 
Street; traveling through the East: so- 
journing in Mexico, and evading the 




Wells of the Areola Oil Company, Sunset Field. 







PAC 



>RTKR 






as. He is a chi| 

would permit i 



be told *o lone *t i! 







J. K I wood. 

basking in the brightness oi my lady's 
eating caramels or sipping beer, 
in improve the opportunities that were 
presented to them, and when they fi- 
nally came to a realization of the true 
condition of affairs, they found it was 
too late. It is the same old story that 
has been written a hundred times, and 



had b 



■ the »urplu 
It i- related thai when hard 

iered thai 
ild he Found along the 
Kern River, and when i! 
nouncemenl was made of the 

troleum nn the Means farm, he 

oi land Irom the Southern Pacific Rail- 

road Company .it tin- rate 

acre, making a cash payment of fifty 

rents an aere. which was not .i:- 
matter for him at that time Bunting 
was lucky. I" a few mouths he sold 
some of the land for $700 an aere. and 
a little later knocked down more of it 
at S.t.joo an acre. But some of the 
-t of the territory he kept and 
■.ns 55 per cent of the stork 
.ii the San Joaquin Oil Company be- 
sides many other holdings, and il 
of the richest men of the slate. He 
sold the land to the Monte Cristo Oil . 







hpny. 



Thomas F. Maker. Pounderof Bakerafield. 

first iluiis' he did was 1 pay off the 
■ ii the farm. Mrs. Bunting 
was still there, and i 11st to show his 
i there was 
no coolness on his part, he went down 
into Ins pocket and pulled out a roll 
of bills and gave them to her. She ad- 
mired him for il and probably told him 



Asphalt Combination* 

The asphalt refiners have form- 
ed an association called the Re- 
finers' Association of Southern 

California, aiul have entered into 
an agreement nol to sell their 
product below certain figures, 
thus avoiding unnecessary and 
ruinous competition. The com- 
panies in the nssociation are the 
' Hercules; New Trauklin Refining 
company, 1'nion Consolidated, 
Densniore-Stabler, Southern, Na- 
tional, Coombs. Pacific Coast and 
Jewett & Blodgett. 

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New Development Work in the Outskirts of the Kern River Field. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTRR. 



THE OIL INDUSTRY. 

Magnificent Prospects tor Great Increase 
in the Immediate Future. 



The Demand for California Oil Is Greatly Increasing, 

and the Present Capacity oT All the Oil Fields 

Will Soon Be Taxed to the Utmost. 



era, mine? -oads and light 

nand 



■omul 



Total. 



In November Dr. C. T. Deane, 
President of the 'California Pe- 
troleum Miners' Association, de- 
livered the following address be- 
fore the annual convention of the 
Calfornia Petroleum Miners' As- 
sociation. The address was printed 
in the Pacific Oil Reporter 
the week following its reading, 
but the demand for the paper was 
so great the edition was soon ex- 
hausted. The address is now re- 
printed in full. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen of 
the California Miners' Association: 

One year ago, when I had the 
honor of reading a paper on " The 
Oil Industry of California " before 
you, I said: " I present the follow- 
ing facts and suggestions on the oil- 
mining industry of the State. In 
it are included statistics gleaned 
from the most reliable sources upon 
the subject, which will demonstrate 
to you the marvelous development 
which has taken place during the 
last twelve months along the great 
oil belt, together with the possibili- 
ties in store, from a commercial 
standpoint, for an industry which 
already ranks as one of the most 
important in the State." I have 
now to continue the story from the 
time elapsed since writing the 
above. Without going into the 
scientific phase of the question, 
leaving that for abler hands, we 
will simply review the situation 
from a commercial standpoint. 
DIFFERENT OIL DISTRICTS. 

There are now in California 2,500 
producing wells, situated in fourteen 
different districts, as follows: Kern 
River, Sunset, Midway, McKittrick, 
Coalinga, Santa Maria, Los An- 
geles, Fullerton, Puente, Whittier, 
Ventura, Summerland, Brea Can- 
yon and San Mateo; of these, the 
chief oil-producing districts are 
Kern River, Sunset, McKittrick 
and Midway in Kern County, Coal- 
inga in Fresno County, Fullerton 
in Orange County and Santa Maria, 
or Carreaga.in Santa Barbara Coun- 
ty- 

YEARLY OIL CONSUMPTION. 

The total consumption of oil in 
California in 

1900 was 4,000,000 barrels. 

1901 " 8,000,000 " 

1902 will be 12,000,000 " 

1903 (Estimated). 20,000,000 " 

The increase next year will be 
largely due to the railroads burn- 
ing oil exclusively. The reason 
they have not done so heretofore is 
the delay in placing tankage, which 
is rather a slow process, it being 



ssary to place an oil tank 
wherever there is now a coal hunk- 
er, about fifty miles apart along 
the whole line. 

I have calculated very carefully 
the amount the railroad compa- 
nies will use, and, taking a very 
conservative view, I cannot make 



but from a careful ition 

of nil the fai i- which :m- daily 

brought to mv attention it i 

Delude that before tl nd of 

we will be producing and mar- 
keting 60.000,000 barrels of oil |w<r 
annum, but for the present 20,000,- 
ooo is a sat'.' estimate. 

If every well now exit 
pumping to its full capacity, 18, 
000,000 barrels is as much as we 
could put into consumption. A 

wry large number of the 2,500 




Dr. C. T. DBane. 
Secretary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



it below 8,000,000 barrels, equal in 
amount to what the whole State 
consumed in 1901. I have had this 
estimate confirmed by several dif- 
erent experts, both railroad and oil 
men. One of the very best informed 
of these gentlemen makes it 10,000,- 
000 barrels, which certainly places 
me within bounds. 

The factories, railroads, electric 
light companies and gas companies 
(gas is now being made exclusively 
from oil) in and around San Fran- 
cisco will certainly use 3,000,000 
barrels, (Fire Marshal Towe in- 
forms me there are over three hun- 
dred boilers using oil daily in San 
Francisco), and we have left for the 
rest of the State 9,000,000 barrels, 
which is hardly enough, when you 
take into consideration the steam- 



wells alluded to above (at least 
1,000) are in or near the City of 
Los Angeles, and these wells pro- 
duce less than one million and a 
half barrels per year, so we have 
therefore to look for our great sup- 
ply in the future to the other dis- 
tricts — Fullerton, Kern River, Coal- 
inga, Sunset, Midway and McKit- 
trick. It is easy to perceive from 
these figures that the main difficul- 
ty for some time to come will be to 
provide a supply of oil in conform- 
ity with the continually growing 
demand. 

PRICE OF OIL TO ADVANCE. 

Instead of capped wells, and 
each corporation underbidding each 
other, trying to force the price of 
'oil down for selfish purposes, all 
caps will be removed, and pumps 



will w nd night to mer 

will jun 
v i and 

It V 
Benutl ..in:; 

■ nts. and ii i> I 

. .un 
afraid that some of the corporations 
that have been making long con- 
! I 'ill be 
trying to evade them, and it will 
not be astonishing to see s heavy 

■ Top of lawsuit-. 

TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES. 
There are 1,800 tank cars owned 

by the Southern Pacific and Santa 
Be Railroads and the Standard Oil 
Company, and a Few more by out- 
side companies carrying oil in Cali- 
fornia. There should be at least 
2,000 cars to do the business. The 
railroad is using a large number fill- 
own tanks, and there is fre- 
quently a shortage for commercial 
purposes. The California Petroleum 
Miners' Association has been trying 
for two weeks unsuccessfully to get 
two tank cars to send to Washing- 
ton for the purpose of testing Cali- 
fornia oil in the naval furnace there 
for use on our national ships. 
Whether this condition will be re- 
lieved after the completion of the 
pipe-line which the Standard Oil 
company is now building from 
Kern County to Point Richmond, 
on the Bay of San Francisco, is 
problematical, as they will require 
a large quantity of oil for their great 
refinery, which is about completed 
at that place. It is assumed that 
they will be able to transport from 
eight to ten thousand barrels per 
day through the pipe. This pipe- 
line is eight inches in diameter and 
278 miles long. 

The cost of transporting oil from 
Kern County to San Francisco is 
now about 40 cents, including 
switching, etc. I doubt very much 
whether a lower cost of transporta- 
tion will particularly help the pro- 
ducer, but it certainly must the 
consumer, as he is the man to pay 
all costs of production. 

THE LIFE OF THE WELLS. 

The next thing to take into con- 
sideration is the life of the wells. 
The life of an oil district depends 
upon the number of proven acres 
and the depth of the oil sand. Ex- 
perts contend that about 20 percent 
of the sand is oil, and that about 
80 percent of the oil contained in 
the sand can be recovered; conse- 
quently, in a district where the 
sand is 300 feet thick, there should 
be a little less than a half million 
barrels to the acre, or a patch of 20 
acres, roughly speaking, should give 
8,000,000 barrels. It is claimed by 
many of the most careful experts 
that about 10,000 acres in these 
four districts, viz.: Kern River, 
Sunset, Midway and McKittrick 
have been proven; by proven we 
mean that wherever on these acres 
you sink a well you will most prob- 
ably get oil, so that if you have 
10,000 acres of land, with sand 300 
feet thick, (the real fact is that on 



i8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 







Lake of Oil Hastily Formed to Retain the Product of a Newly Drilled Well in Sunset. 



a great deal of the above lands the 
sand is over 500 feet thick) we 
ought to have close to half a million 
barrels to the acre, or allowing for 
first and second-class land at least 
two thousand million barrels of oil, 
so there is no need of this genera- 
tion worrying much whether it will 
last our time. 

Mr. H. L. Dort, a very careful 



the United States, from its discov- 
ery up to the discovery of the Kern 
County oil fields, is estimated by 
the most competent authorities at 
about 1,000,000,000 barrels, and 
this county alone may eventually 
produce more than this amount, 
and in a form, as a cheap fuel, the 
most necessary factor to the devel- 
opment of the Coast's manufactur- 



Russia,for instance, which has pro- 
duced 75,000,000 barrels annually 
for a great many years, and an ex- 
pert from there, who was recently 
inspecting our lands, told me he 
considered them equal to those at 
Baku. We certainly ought to be- 
lieve him. When asked what the 
lands in Baku were worth, he said 
$50,000 an acre. I leave you to 



21,634 long tons of the value of 
$315,219, according to the report of 
Mr. Lewis E. Aubury, State Min- 
eralogist. This year we ought to 
produce 35,000 long tons. For the 
purpose of competing with the for- 
eign supply we should have a pro- 
tective tariff on asphalt and lower 
freight transportation. At the pres- 
ent time the railroad charges $11.00 




Long Train of Loaded Oil Tank Cars that Daily leaves the Kern River Oil District. 



and over-cautious expert in those 
fields, writes me as follows: "A care- 
ful consideration of the demon- 
strated area of these Kern County 
oil fields, the thickness and oil-con- 
taining qualities of the sands, justi- 
fies the belief that they contain con- 
siderably more than 1,000,000,000 
barrels of oil, and possibly twice as 
much. The total oil production in 



ing and transportation industries, 
and very necessary to the mining, 
agricultural and domestic interests, 
which will redound more to the 
general advantage of the State as a 
whole than any other of its natural 
resources." 

These figures may seem large, but 
when you take into consideration 
other great oil districts, Baku, in 



draw your own conclusions. 
OIL REFINERIES. 
The number of refineries reported 
last year was eleven; this year I 
have to report thirty-three. These 
refineries make asphalt, lubricants, 
distillates and coke. The amount 
of asphalt imported from foreign 
countries last year was 154,729 long 
tons. California produced last year 



per ton to Missouri-River points. 

OIL SUPERSEDING COAL. 
Coal importations from foreign 
countries have dropped off nearly 
one half the past year, as the fol- 
lowing letter from Mr. J. W. Har- 
rison, coal expert, shows: 

San Francisco, Cal., Nov. 8, 1902. 
Dk. C. T. Deane, Mills Building, City. 
Dear Sir : The total arrivals of for- 




Group of Wells in Sunset District. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 







Oil from One of the Flowing Wells of the California Fortune Company, in Sunset District. 



eign coals from Australia, England and 
Wales for the first nine months of 1901, 
foot up 749,943 tons. The quantity im- 
ported here from the same sources for 
the first nine months of 1902 foot up 
440,023 tons, showing a shrinkage this 
year, for the same period of time, of 309,- 
920 tons. 

The prices for bituminous grades, im- 
ported principally from Australia, will 
average about $6.00 per long ton in 
cargo lots. For anthracite coal from 
Swansea, the average cost per cargo will 
be about $7.75 per ton. 

The quantity of foreign coal now afloat 
en route to San Francisco, is less than 
has been known for many years. 
Yours truly, 

J. W. Hakeison. 

This shows that we have kept in 
the State $2,169,440 which other- 
wise would have gone to foreign 
countries. The importations of 
domestic coal have fallen off more 
than 25 percent. 

There is a great deal of. calk 
about the present prosperity in 
San Francisco. This is largely due 
to the discovery of oil. Manufac- 
turing has been encouraged by the 
low price of fuel oil, costing about 
75 cents to the consumer, equal to 
$3.00 per ton for coal. 

Dividends from oil properties 
have amounted during the. past 
two years to over two million dol- 
lars. This sum, together with the 
money retained, which would other- 
wise have gone out of the State for 
coal, has instead gone to swell the 
capital accumulating with the banks 
all over California, helping to boom 
the market for realty and invest- 
ments, which has been so active 
and buoyant of late. 

OIL IN ORE REDUCTION. 

It has not yet been demonstrated 
that iron ore can be smelted in 



commercial quantities with oil, al- 
though it has been done as a labor- 
atory process, but there are many 
who believe that it is only a ques- 
tion of time when this will be ac- 
complished; but even of coke, we 
will have a goodly supply at prob- 
ably reduced figures when the great 
refinery of the Standard Oil com- 
pany gets into operation in a few 
months from now, as I understand, 
they will not make asphaltum, but 
coke. 

LIQUID FUEL FOR STEAMERS. 

It might be well to mention here 
the successful use of oil as a fuel 
for marine boilers. There are 200 
boilers now using oil in this State. 
The steamers of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company are being altered, 
as the Mariposa running to Tahiti 
has proven such a success. She is 
now on her fifth trip, and I under- 
stand that the owners save in the 
neighoorhood of $200 per day. The 
Pacific Mail is also inquiring into 
the advisability of using oil on its 
steamers. One important fact has 
been proven by the use of oil, and 
that is increased speed is obtained 
of almost a knot an hour. This is 
accounted for by the fact that the 
heat is more continuous and reg- 
ular for the reason that the furnace 
doors are not being continually 
opened for the purpose of keeping 
up the fires. You hear so much 
said about oil fuel deteriorating the 
fired parts of boilers that we have 
made careful inquiry on the sub- 
ject from Mr. John K. Bulger, 
United States Local Inspector of 
Boilers for this coast, and he re- 



ports that the boilers of the steam 
er Pasadena, inspected by him in 
August, 1902, and which have been 
burning oil for the past eleven 
years, were in perfect condition, also 
that the boilers of the George 
Loomis, which have been burning 
oil for the past eight years, and 
which were inspected in Novem- 
ber, 1902, were the same, there be- 
ing no signs of crystallization show- 
ing on any of the fired parts. 

Lieutenant Ward P. Winchell, 
United States Navy, in his report 
to the Navy Department in regard 
to the success attending the use of 
oil for fuel on the first trans-Pacific 
trip of the steamer Mariposa to 
Tahiti, said: " The most careful in- 
spection at Tahiti failed to show 
any bad effect of the flame upon the 
boilers." 

As to the safety of burning oil 
in marine boilers we have simply 
to say that the insurance compa- 
nies have not raised their rates on 
oil-burning steamers, which an- 
swers that question thoroughly. 

OIL ON ROADS. 

The dusty-road nuisance will be 
a thing of the past in a few years, 
due to sprinkling with oil, and 
railroad travel in this State will be 
made much more agreeable. The 
general manager of the Santa Fe 
system, Mr. A. G. Wells, informs 
me that they have oiled 666.5 miles 
of their roadbed to their great satis- 
faction, and we are reliably in- 
formed, although not officially, that 
the Southern Pacific have oiled over 
three hundred miles of theirs. The 
several counties in the State are oil- 
ing their roads, and find it 50 per- 
cent cheaper than water. As a local 
object lesson we have the drives in 
our beautiful Golden Gate Park, 
which have been oiled now for over 
two years, and the public are en- 
thusiastic as to the result. 

There are about 5,000 barrels of 



btainable. 

rACTUMKG in 
TR: 

■tin r point upon which 1 wish 
- tl»' increase which 
in local i 

inng industries. Tin- r.'.iHMt.- 
ikh) barrels of nil which will be 

ini'1 i his year represent in 

,000,000 tons of coal. Thin is 
fully one sixth more than the total 
■mount of coal ever before oon- 
ramed annually in this State. This 
can I"' ascribed solely to the enlarge- 
ment of thr manufacturing inter- 

rought about by thedeoline in 
the cost of fuel, and, had it tint 
been lor the discovery of oil in 
California, manufacturers would 
never have been able to branch oul 
as they have done tin- past two 
in a way which nut only 
enables them to hold their own 

with their Eastern rivals, hut to 

enter the field as competitors. 

INVESTMENT OF FOREIGN CAPITAL. 

There are a number of fo rein 

syndicates quietly buying our oil 
lands, while our own rich men hes- 
itate to make the same investments. 
An English gentleman, the agent of 
London capitalists, told me they 
were selling five dollars' worth for 
25 cents down in Kern. There are 
a number of English, French and 
Belgian companies now in exist- 
ence, which few people in this coun- 
try ever hear of, and two of these 
companies that I know of are pay- 
ing dividends. The oil business is 
so new to us that our business men 
do not as yet apprciate its im- 
portance; when they do, they will 
have to pay much larger prices for 
land than they can get it for to- 
day. Proven oil lands are selling 
from $500 to $5,000 an acre. These 
lands could have been bought two 
or three years ago readily at $10 
an acre. In a few years they will 
sell for three times the price they 
are selling for now. 

COST OF PUMPING. 

The cost of pumping oil varies 
according to the number ofwells. 
A large number, say ten or twenty, 
ought not to cost over 1.5 or 2 cents 
per barrel (42 gallons). I know of 
one exceedingly well-managed com- 
pany which has reduced the cost to 
1 cent a barrel. 

DEPTH AND COST OF THE WELLS. 

The wells in Kern River, Sunset, 
Midway and McKittrick average 
from 900 to 1,200 feet in depth, and 
ought to cost, barring accidents, 
about $5,000 each to sink. This 
does not include the rig. 

CONSERVATIVE FIGURES. 

The above is briefly an account 
of the oil lands of California from 
a commercial point of view. All 
the figures are absolutely conserva- 
tive and the California Petroleum 
officially. As I saidlast year, the 
California Petroleum Miners' Asso- 
ciation will vouch for them. This 
Association feels that in making 
statements of the kind quasi-public 
as they are in character, they 
should be as correct as a govern- 
ment official report, free from mis- 
statements or exaggerations, cal- 
culated to mislead. I have, there- 
fore, been particularly careful in 
collating facts, and when it was 
possible have had them verified 
Miners' Association desires to be 
free from any suspicion of attempt- 
ing to boom an industry which is 
abundantly able to stand on its 
own merits. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 




One of the Gushers on the Santa Fe Lease, Fullerton Field. 



FULLERTON OIL FIELDS. 



A District That Produces a High-Grade Re- 
fining Oil. 



The Total Output Now Exceeds 100,000 Barrels a 

Month, and Is Rapidly Increasing.— The Pro= 

duct in Great Demand at High Prices. 



Some seventeen years ago the 
first oil well ever drilled in south- 
ern California was put down in 
the Fullerton field by the Puente 
Oil company on its own lease — to- 
day one of the best producers of 
high gravity oil in the State. For 
many years work on this lease 
went on quietly, until 1895 a con- 
tract was made with the Chlno 
Beet Sugar company for 80,000 
barrels of oil the first year. 



Since then the output from this 
field has greatly increased. A 4- 
inch pipe-line was at once laid 
from the wells to Chino, a dis- 
tance of over 15 miles. Oil was 
then worth from 75 cents to $1 a 
barrel, but the same gravity oil 
from the Puente company's lease 
now is worth $1.75 a barrel, as it 
runs up to as high as 37 B., 
gravity, and most all of it is now 
sold for refining purposes. 



The cost of drilling and equip- 
ping a well here or anywhere in 
California, while greater than in 
the eastern fields, is about uniform 
in all the California territory. It 
is estimated at from $2,500 up for 
an average well of from 800 to 
1,200 feet. The wages here vary 
slightly, but as a rule they are 
about 20 percent higher than in 
the East. 

The next oil field, which proved 
to be a heavy producer, was 
opened in the Fullerton field by 
the Santa Fe railroad company on 
its own territory, an extensive 
tract northeast of town, and about 
five miles east of the Puente com- 
pany's wells. 

The Santa Fe had a large pro- 
duction within a year or two after 
it began development work here, 
and for many years consumed all 
the oil from its Fullerton fields, 
and more, too; but the past two 
years it has been selling a good 
portion of its immense output for 
refining purposes at $1.75 a barrel, 
and purchasing a lot of cheap oil 
in Bakersfield for its engines, as 
low gravity oil from that field, 
mixed with some of the Fullerton 



oil, gives just as good satisfaction 
as oil of a much higher gravity. 
The Santa Fe now has oyer 30 
wells, all good producers, on the 
pump here. 

Soon after the Santa Fe had its 
work well under way, the Graham 
& Loftus company entered the 
field on an adjoining lease, and 
that company has since cleaned up 
something like $300,000 in profits 
during the past few years. This 
company opened up some of the 
best spouters in the Fullerton 
field, some of them going as high 
as 3,000 barrels a day. This com- 
pany is now pumping a large num- 
ber of wells, getting high gravity 
oil from all of them. 

Then followed the Columbia Oil 
company, the Fullerton Consoli- 
dated company, the Fullerton Oil 
company, the Olinda Oil company 
— all of which are in successful 
operation — and a number of small- 
er companies near the Santa Fe's 
wells. 

The next territory opened in 
the Fullerton field was in the Brea 
canyon hills, directly north of 
Fullerton, and about half way be- 
tween the Puente Oil company 













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Brea Canyon Oil Company's Well, Fullerton Field. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORThR 



ii 



and Santa Fe company leases, by 
the Brea Canyon Oil company and 
the Union Oil company. The Brea 
Canyon Oil company opened up 
the biggest gusher ever tapped in 
any Fullerton territory, one of its 
gushers for a short time spouting 
at the rate of 24,000 barrels a day. 
One of the gushers on this com- 
pany's lease has paid net $142,000 
during the past ten months, and it 
is believed this is the most won- 
derful well ever opened in any 
California field. 

The Union Oil company has also 
been very successful with its wells 
in this canyon, and, like the Brea 
Canyon company, has a large num- 
ber of wells on the pump. The 
Union company has just installed 
a rotary drill which has a capacity 
of 3,000 feet in depth, and the 
company is now going after very 
high gravity oil with the new ro 
tary drill which is operated by 
two experts from the Pennsyl- 
vania fields. 

A goodly part of the Fullerton 
oil is conveyed to San Pedro by 
the Union Oil company's 4-inch 
pipe-line, a distance of 30 miles, 
and from that point the Union 
company ships to San Francisco 
for refining and other purposes. 
The Union is the heaviest pur- 
chaser of oil in the Fullerton field, 
though the Santa Fe is still buy- 
ing large quantities of oil here in 
addition to its own output, on ac- 
count of its ten-year contract with 
one or two companies not having, 
expired, and which will yet run 
about three years. The Santa Fe 



moves its oil out, also the product 
of other companies, by a branch 
railroad built direct to the wells 
from its main line. 

On account of so much of the 
Fullerton oil being refined and of 
the increasing output on the rail- 
roads and for oiling public high- 
ways there is a very strong de- 
mand here for every barrel of oil 
that can be produced and the mar- 
ket price is now higher than ever 
before in the history of the Fuller- 
ton field. 

There is much development 
work going on in the entire Ful- 
lerton field twenty-four hours 
every day, and there are now 
nearly thirty new wells being 
drilled and some ten or twelve 
rigs in course of construction for 
more new wells. One of the old- 
time companies here has found 
good indications of white oil, 
which is worth several dollars a 
barrel, on undeveloped territory a 
few miles north of the Santa Fe 
company's wells, and is now mak- 
ing arrangements for water, etc., 
to begin development work on the 
property. Every company op- 
erating in the Fullerton field is 
developing its property and many 
more new wells will be brought 
in within the next sixty days. 

The Fullerton field is now pro- 
ducing monthly nearly 125,000 
barrels of oil, most all of which 
is high gravity and it is believed 
the output will run up to be- 
tween 175,000 and 200,000 barrels 
monthly within the next year. 
The output here now is as follows 



by the old established comp 

Name. Hariris. 

Brea < .-11,000 

Santa Fr Railway I C 40.000 

•,000 

5,500 

11,000 

Ohm!. 1 1,000 

Fiillri 4, 000 

Fullerton Consolidated Oil Co ... 






3,000 
13,000 



il output pet month 107,000 

The heavy gusher on the Bfea 
Canyon Oil company's lease has 
been gushing many months un- 
der a pressure of 190 pounds 



HERB'S A CHANCE 
FOR A DIVIDEND ! 



We want you to write to us for par- 
ticulars about buying or leasing fur a 
term of years on royalty, some proven 
land in the 



McKittrick Oil District 



Any acreage from ten to one hundred 
and sixty acres, the latter to include 
fully equipped camp and producing 
well, absolutely no incumbrance. 



BENDER & HEWITT 

1912 Chester Avenue 
'Phone, Main 301 BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 




A Thirty-Seven-Thousand-Barrel Tank, Kern River — Courtesy of the Potomac Oil Company. 



READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe = - Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



IS THE BEST 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PETROLEUM INDICATIONS. 



California Abounds in Evidence of the Pres= 
ence of Crude Petroleum. 



These Evidences Are Very Plain, and Can Be Dis= 
cerned Even More Plainly Than Those Indicat- 
ing the Presence of Valuable Minerals. 



A. S. Cooper, M. E 
The surface indications of the 
presence of oil beneath the sur- 
face in the States of Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, Indiana and West Virginia 
are very meagre. 
It is different in California. 
Owing to the high angles at 
which the strata of the coast 
ranges are uplifted and bent, anti- 
clinal and other structures can be 
plainly seen and studied. Asphal- 
tum, bituminized sands and shales, 
oil seepages, gas exhalations, also 
the evidences of metamorphlc and 
water action that usually are asso- 
ciated with bituminous deposits, 



leum. In Calfornia, as well as 
elsewhere, anticlinal structure ex- 
erts a great influence on the ac- 
cumulation of petroleum oil; es- 
pecially is this true where the 
formation lies below the line of 
permanent water and the dips of 
the anticline are steep. Petroleum 
oil being buoyant in water, its in- 
clination is to ascend through por- 
ous strata, encased in impervious 
strata. The porous strata act as 
conduits to convey the petroleum 
oil towards the axis and apex of 
the anticline. 



California usually runs parallel 
with the mountain ranges, and 
often form the summit of the 
mountains in the southern part of 
the State, where denudation has 
not been very great during a long 
epoch of time. 

Many times auriferous gravel 
beds are found covered with allu- 
vium, which do not contain gold. 
This alluvial cover is from a few 
feet to several hundred feet in 
thickness. Beds of rivers filled 
with gravel have been located, 
and attempts made to turn the 




A. S. Cooper, M. E. 

burned and leached shales, gypsif- 
erous deposits, mineral springs, the 
evidences of former mineral springs 
— all of these indications of the 
presence of bitumen are scattered 
throughout the coast ranges and 
the foot hills of the Sierra Nevada 
in great profusion. Therefore a 
geologist can locate an oil field 
with far more certainty in Cali- 
fornia than in the States men- 
tioned above. 

The surface indications of petro- 
leum are equally as valuable in 
determining the accumulations of 
petroleum underground as the sur- 




Geological Formation at the Modelo Wells, Ventura County. 



face indications of precious and 
economical minerals are valuable 
in determining the position and 
presence of these minerals under 
the ground. 

The time is not very distant that 
In many instances structure alone 
will govern the location of a well 
irrespective of any other surface 
indication. 

In a district where the rocks 
are impregnated with bitumen, 
anticlines should contain petro- 



Anticlinal structure can be as- 
certained from exposures and the 
strike of the same with greater 
certai ty than the course of a hid- 
den stream covered with lava. 
The direction of an anticline is 
usually straight, and this straight- 
ness may be maintained for a long 
distance, whereas the beds of 
these hidden streams descending 
from the flanks of the Sierra Ne- 
vada are usually sinuous. Then 
again the axis of an anticline in 



river from its bed so that bed-rock 
could be reached, and the gold 
upon the same obtained. Fre- 
quently these attempts have been 
unsuccessful after the expendi- 
ture of many thousands of dollars. 
Lands containing m'nes described 
above have been located and pat- 
ented under the mining laws of 
the United States. . The surface 
indications of the presence of 
these placers is no better than the 
surface indications of the presence 





"■^^TP7m?|T^p» 




Anticline at Point Arena, Mendocino County. — A, Bituminous Sand Bed. B, Axis of Anticline. 



T 



PACIFIC Oil. RKPORTRR 



of subterranean porous beds con 
taining petroleum oil. 

Quartz is a good indication of 
tbe presence of gold; asphalt urn 
and bituminized sands are bet- 
ter indications of the presence of 
petroleum, than quartz is of silver 
or gold. 

For instance the locations of old 
stream beds containing gold are 
covered by a capping of volcanic 
material, sometimes hundreds of 
feet in thickness. These subter- 
ranean deposits are reached by 
tunnels, the position of these 
stream beds being conjectured by 
exposures where they have not 
been coveted by volcanic material, 
or where the volcanic material 
has been eroded. The general 
course of these hidden streams is 
towatd the centre of the Sacra 
mento valley. Other geological 
conditions that are present assist 
in giving their position. There 
is no certainty that when found 
these old stream beds can be 
profitably worked. 

Many copper deposits in Cali- 
fornia are Indicated on the surface 
by a deposit of iron, containing 
but a slight amount of copper, the 
copper having been leached from 
the iron by meteoric waters. Be- 
low this iron cap, carbonates of 
copper exist and further below, 
when under the line of permanent 
water, pyrites containing copper 
are obtained. 

Asphaltum, being the residue of 
petroleum alter the volatile parts 
have evaporated, is as conclusive 
a proof as to the existence of pe- 
troleum in a formation, as the iron 
cap is a proof as to the existence 
of copper. The impregnation of 
pervious rocks by bitumen is an 
indication of the presence of pe- 
troleum as the iron cap is of cop- 
per. 

It must be remembered that in 
case oil is obtained, the reward is 
so great in comparison with the 
usual investment that a prudent 
man is justified in making an at- 
tempt to secure an oil well in land 
where but little surface indica- 
tions exist. 

A person can invest in oil 
property, judging its value by 
surface indications, with the same 
prudency that can be exercised 
in investing in property having 
the surface indications of minerals 
other than petroleum. 

Many lode, placer, drift, and hy- 
draulic claims have been located 
and patented that have not paid 
for working, and never will. 

As many animal fossils exist in 
the synclines as in the anticlines; 
notwithstanding this, but little 
bituminized shale is found in the 
synclines, a rock from which pe- 
troleum is not removed by buoy- 
ancy of oil in water. If animal 
fossils were the source from which 
petroleum is derived, all the un- 
altered rocks of the coast ranges 
would contain a greater or less 
amount of bitumen. Consequently 
fossils of any particular age are 
not indicative of the presence of 
petroleum. 

The unaltered rocks of the 
coast ranges of California only 
extend to the Cretaceous period. 
All of the Tertiary age contains 
petroleum oil, also the Cretaceous 
Nothing has been shown to prove 
that the petroleum contained in 







View of an Oil Well in the Redwoods of Santa Cruz County. 

these rocks is indigenous. Even name. tonnage. 
if it is true (although there is no Piedmont 1,854 

Richmond 135 

San Pablo 1,584 



reason to believe that it is) that 
petroleum oil is derived from or- 
ganic animal life, there is no 
reason to believe that animal life 
of the Cretaceous age has not con- 
tributed as much oil as the animal 
life of the Tertiary period. From 
exposures as many animal fossil 
remains exist in the Cretaceous as 
the Tertiary. 

No connection between animal 
fossil remains and petroleum oil 
has ever been shown. 

Therefore the geological age of 
a formation is not indicative of 
the presence of bitumen. 



Steamers Burning Oil. 

Permits have been granted by 
tbe United States Inspector of 
Steam Boilers at San Francisco to 
use oil on the following steam 
vessels: 

NAME. TONNAGE. 

Sea King 181 

Sea Prince 58 

Sea Rover 80 

Rescue '. . 172 

Mariposa 3. 158 

Alameda 3, 15S 

Enterprise 2,675 

Newark 1,783 

Encioa! 2,OT4 

Berkeley ',945 

Oakland 1,672 

Transit 1,509 

Solano 3,549 

Thoroughfare 1 1,012 

El Capitan 982 



Warrior 122 

Falcon 117 

"Hermosa 454 

George Loomis 691 

Tamalpais 1,554 

Pasadena 300 

Olympic 450 

Brunswick 450 

Santa Monica 497 

G. C. Lindauer 459 

Alliance 679 

South Bay 600 

Albion River 450 

Prentiss 450 

Wizard 139 

Hercules 96 

A. C. Freese , 205 

St. Helena 205 

General Frisbie 544 

T. C. Walker 786 

J. D. Peters 884 

Mary Garratt 810 

H. J. Corcoran 682 

H. E. Wright 562 

Brooklyn 674 

Garden City 1,080 

Valletta 4J9 

Apache 938 

Modoc 929 

Monticello 226 

Centralia 800 

Nevadan 4, 408 

Nebraskan 4, 408 

St. Vallier 60 

Comet 50 

Charles Counselman 123 

Fulton 386 

Priscilla 51 

Vulcan 327 

Elkkader 31 

Iralda 90 

Hannah 1,211 

Eureka of Seattle 3,015 

Flora 1S5 

Jacinto 235 

San Joaquin No. 2 242 Total, in 88,981 



NAME. TONNAGE 

San Joaquin No. 3 320 

4 36S 

Dover 244 

Varina 230 

A. H . Payson 150 

Alton 106 

Hazel 80 

Red Bluff 246 

Arctic 392 

Dispatch 698 

Del Norte 450 

Cazadero 1,500 

President 564 

Marshfield 388 

Sarah 1,211 

Billa 370 

Louise 717 

Susie 1,211 

Leah 477 

El Capitan 1,100 

South Bay 438 

Columbia 2,721 

Geo. W. Elder 1,729 

Iaqua 712 

Napa City 178 

Alcatraz 255 

Eagle 2 

Asuncion 2,196 

Eureka 484 

Searchlight 100 

Tiger 250 

No Wonder 269 

Herman 456 

Charles R. Spencer 474 

Redondo 679 

Kehani 118 

Del Norte 450 

Rosecrans 2, 700 

Dallas City 446 

Neponset 224 

Regulator 50S 

Sen Pedro 452 

Aberdeen 566 

Chehalis 663 

Alcatraz 450 

Alcazar 450 

Potrero 500 



-24 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



CRUDE OIL IN SMELTING. 



Ideal Conditions Prevailing Where Liquid 
Fuel Is Used. 



Practical and Extended Use o! Crude Oil Demon- 
strates Its Value and Economy— Care Should 
Be Exercised in the Choice of Oil. 



The following valuable and in- 
teresting paper was read by Al- 
fred Von der Ropp, the superin- 
tendent of the Selby 'Smelting 
company, at the eleventh an- 
nual convention of the California 
Miners' Association held in Nov- 
ember in San Francisco. 

Mr. President, and Gentlemen 
of the California Miners' Associa- 
tion: 

Through your secretary, Mr. E. 
Benjamin, I received a request to 



generator. Another way of get- 
ting at the comparative values of 
liquid fuel and coal is the follow- 
ing: In a large matting furnace 
of the reverberatory type, it is 
considered that one ton of coal 
should smelt about three and one- 
half tons of ore. I find that in 
the same matting furnace at 
Selby, I can smelt one ton of ore 
with one barrel of oil; this would 
give us three and one-half barrels 
of oil to three and one-half tons of 



14 lead furnaces with 14 burners; 
13 zinc retorts, with 13 burners; 
3 cupel furnaces with 3 burners; 
1 antimony furnace, with 1 burner; 
1 furnace for melting fine silver, 
with 1 burner. Total, 47. 

In all of these furnaces, the use 
of crude oil has brought about a 
saving of from forty to sixty per- 
cent in the cost of fuel over coal. 
And this does not represent all 
the benefit to be derived from the 
use of liquid fuel in metallurgical 
establishments. 

Let me quote you a few simple 
chemical reactions that you all 
are more or less familiar with, and 
which are of vital importance to 
all metallurgical institutions. 

In the process of oxidizing sul- 
phide ores, commonly called roast- 
ing, or desulphurizing, it is neces- 
sary that the atmosphere in the 
roasting furnace should contain as 
much free oxygen as possible to 
enable the sulphur in the raw 
material to oxidize or burn off in 



a second. This means that we can 
crowd a roasting furnace using oil 
far beyond the capacity of a fur- 
nace using coal, and still we can 
produce a good end roast with the 
same percent of sulphur remain- 
ing. This means that we reduce 
the cost of fuel, labor, and repairs 
per ton of ore treated. In all 
metallurgical furnaces where the 
aim is to oxidize, these same bene- 
fits are to be derived from the use 
of liquid fuel. I quote you, for 
instance, the cupel furnace, where 
the lead is oxidized to litharge, 
leaving the silver and gold on the 
hearth, as dore silver. 

But let me mention the matting 
furnace, of the reverberatory type. 
In this furnace the roasted ore is 
subjected to a white heat to pro- 
duce a quick sintering and melting 
down of the charge. The aim in 
this furnace is to produce, first: 
"a copper-iron matte, which acts 
as an accumulator for the precious 
metals;" and, secondly, 'a slag 




General View of the Kern River Oil Field. 



prepare a short paper "On the 
Use of Crude Oil in Smelting." 
This I have endeavored to do, 
confining myself entirely to the 
practical side of the subject, and 
leaving the discussion of heat 
units, chemical composition of 
liquid fuels, combustion-gases, etc., 
to our more scientific friends — the 
professors of the universities and 
technical schools. 

Fuel oil for the generation of 
steam is not my subject, and you 
all are no doubt familiar with this 
problem. However, let me state 
to you, that at the Selby Smelting 
and Lead company's works, we 
use liquid fuel exclusively for the 
generation of steam — in Stirling 
water tube boilers, rated at 250 and 
290 horse-power, respectively. We 
burn an oil of from 26 to 27 
gravity, and evaporate, per pound 
of oil, 14^ to 15 pounds of water, 
from and at 212 . This gives you 
a basis to figure the comparative 
value of oil with coal as a steam 



ore; or, in other words, three and 
one-half barrels of oil are equal to 
one ton of coal. One ton of good 
coal is worth to-day, in San Fran- 
cisco, we will say, $6. This means 
that one barrel of oil at $1.71, or 
three and one-half barrels at $6, 
would be equal in effective value 
to one ton of coal at $6; and you 
all know that good fuel oil can be 
bought to-day in San Francisco 
for one-half of $1.71 per barrel, 
and even less. In other words 
you can save 50 percent and more 
by the use of liquid fuel instead 
of coal under the prevailing con- 
ditions and prices for coal and oil, 

I wish to mention right now 
that I am not interested in any oil 
wells or oil stocks, and am not at- 
tempting to boom liquid fuel. 

The following metallurgical fur- 
naces use crude oil at our works 
at Selby: 4 roasting furnaces, with 
a total of 11 burners; 1 matting 
furnace, with burners; 1 cop- 
per furnace, with 1 burner; 14 



the shape of sulphur dl-oxide 
(S0 2 ), and sulphur tri- oxide 
(S0 3 ). In using coal as fuel' it 
is impossible to maintain this oxi- 
dizing atmosphere all the time, 
because, every time that fresh fuel 
is fed to the firebox, black gases 
can be seen to fill the interior of 
the furnace, and during this pe- 
riod of incomplete combustion the 
process of roasting, or oxidizing, 
is absolutely at a standstill. What 
happens? A certain amount of 
fuel and time are wasted, and 
nothing is accomplished. 

Now look at the ideal conditions 
prevailing in the roasting furnace 
when liquid fuel is used. Once 
the flame is regulated, by properly 
adjusting the oil and steam inlets, 
we have a clear flame, with' not a 
trace of soot in the roasting cham- 
ber; and this ideal condition con- 
tinues for twenty-four hours per 
day, enabling the sulphur In the 
ores to combine with the oxygen 
in the air during every fraction of 



which is formed from the earthy 
components of the ore." As matte 
is a compound of surphur and 
heavy metals, (mainly copper sul- 
phide and iron sulphide) in fixed 
proportions, it is self-evident that 
the percent of copper in the matte 
depends on the amount of sulphur 
remaining in the charge. 

Suppose now that we use coal 
as fuel in the matting furnace, we 
will have a reducing atmosphere 
whenever the fireman gets busy 
and fills the grate with fresh fuel, 
thus producing an incomplete 
combustion for a certain length of 
time. During this period no sul- 
phur can be oxidized by the oxy- 
gen of the air. With oil we have 
an oxidizing atmosphere during 
every second, and consequently ' 
we find that we produce a higher 
grade copper matte in a furnace 
using liquid fuel than we can pos- 
sibly produce in a furnace using 
coal. On the other hand, if it 
should be desirable to have a re 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



25 



dociog atmosphere in metallurgi- 
cal work, it is ea-y to change from 
au oxidizing atmosphere to a re- 
ducing one in an instant, by either 
choking the air inlet to the fur- 
nace, or increasing the flow of oil 
to the burner. This leads to the 
oil burner proper. 

There have probably been two 
thousand patents granted for oil- 
burners, each claiming remarkable, 
and even most surprising, results. 
l*'or instance:some inventors claim 
that their burners will generate 
hydrogen. When asked to ex- 
plain this, and how they expect to 
benefit the kind people by this 
most remarkable reaction, the 
usual answer is, " the heat decom- 
poses the steam into oxygen and 
hydrogen ; and there you are." 
In their eagerness to praise their 
burners they forget that plus and 
minus balance fairly well in na- 
ture, and that it would take ex- 
actly the same amount of heat to 
disassociate water into its compo- 
nent parts, namely, hydrogen and 
oxygen, as would be generated by 
combining or burning the oxygen 
and hydrogen so generated, minus 
a liberal amount of heat wasted 
by radiation. 

When deciding to use liquid fuel, 
it is necessary to decide whether 
steam or compressed air shall 
be used as an atomizer. Let me 
call your attention to the fact that 
the use of compressed air necessi- 
tates a compressor, and an ap- 
paratus for preheating the com- 
pressed air. This latter appendix 
is very much to be recommended, 
because as you know, in allowing 
compressed air to expand the 
temperature of the surrounding 
air will be lowered. A cold or 
nearly freezing temperature will 
not be beneficial in atomizing li- 
quid fuel preparatory to obtaining 
complete combustion. Steam, on 
the other hand, carries a certain 
amount of heat to the oil, and 
liquifies and even gasifies the same. 
Of course, all this pertains to 
plants on terra fimia. On board 
a steamer it is different, where 
water has to be carried along, or 
sea water is to be distilled, in 
which case I should prefer to use 
air under pressure. 

As the dimensions of metallur- 
gical furnaces are variable ones, 
you will readily understand that 
we need flames of many different 
sizes : for our metallurgical tools. 
For instance, at Selby, the ex- 
treme lengths of flames used are 
eight inches and six feet. In the 
zinc retorts, which are our small- 
est furnaces, we need a flame of 
eight inches. In the large matt- 
ing furnace, 35'xi6' in the clear, 
we heed a flame of six feet or even 
more In length. The burner has 
to be adapted to the furnace, and 
to the work to be performed. 
Hence you will find at metallur- 
gical establishments a great variety 
of burners, or at least a great va- 
riety of sizes of burners, and I 
know of no better all-around bur- 



Iner than the one formed of two gravity corresponding to the one 
concentric pipes, the smaller one contracted for 



being the oil pipe, and the larger When making a contract for 
one the steam carrier. By this nr- liquid fuel insist that nowhere in 
rangement the oil pipe is steam the contract shall appear the words 
jacketed, and the temperature of " fuel oil." but call for crude pe- 
ll raised to such a degree trolenm of a certain gravity, and 



and on top you will find the light 
oil, or distillate. These lumps, 

li the refiners term B. S 
refer you to them lor an explana- 
tion of this, to nu- an entirely new 
and unknown chemical formula), 
will enter your pipes and burners, 
that its fluidity is very much in- insist, if possible, on getting the and will stop your oil system up 
creased, and part of the lighter crude petroleum from wells pro- very effectively. Another point 
oils become gases. All this tends ducing very near the same gravity that should be observed In making 
to break up more or less the vis- of oil. Suppose you contract for contracts for crude petroleum Is 
cous oil into minute particles, "fuel oil" of, say, ao° gravity; (and the percentage of moisture and 
which ignite readily when brought not for "crude petroleum") it is grit allowed in the oil. Two per- 
itact with the oxygen of possible, and also probable, that cent is a liberal allowance to be 

you will receive a fuel oil of 20° 



the surrounding atmosphere. 



made to the seller, and if the crude 




Screwing together Lengths of Casing for a Kern County Oil Well. 



The following advice to future 
users of oil as fuel may not be 
amiss in concluding this paper : 

First. By all means engage an 
expert to install your plant, and 
do not experiment yourselves, as 
it costs money to do so. 

Secondly. Do not use a mix- 
ture of different gravity oils. 

Thirdly. Do not use a mixture 
of heavy residues with light oils 
from the oil refineries, as this mix- 
ture w 11 not remain mixed. Oil 
refineries are very fond of mixing 
heavy residues with some light 
oils, thus producing an oil of the 



gravity, but you will not always 
receive crude petroleum at 20° 
gravity. The refiner has a perfect 
right by this contract for "fuel 
oil" and not "crude petrolem," to 
send you a mixture of residuum 
of, say, io° gravity and a distillate 
of crude oil of 35 gravity in such 
proportions that the mixture will 
show 20 gravity. This mixture 
will be pumped into your storage 
tanks, and in a very short time the 
heavy and light ingredients will 
separate. At the bottom of your 
storage tank you will finds lumps 
af big as 10" to 12' in diameter; 



oil contains more than two percent 
water and dirt a proportionate de- 
duction should be made from the 
oil received. 

A very simple test for the de- 
termination of the grit and water 
in crude oil is thejpllowing: Place 
in a graduated tube .01 cubic cen- 
timeter of the oil to be tested; add 
to this .01 cubic centimeter of gas- 
oline; shake this mixture well, 
and let it remain in a fairly warm 
place for twenty-four hours. By 
that time the water and sand, be- 
ing heavier than the gasoline and 
crude oil, will have settled to the 



26 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



bottom. By counting the cubic 
centimeters that represent the 
water and grit, which are easy to 
be distinguished from the oil, you 
have the percentage without any 
figuring. 

During the last few years I 
have been repeatedly approached 
by parties asking me why I do not 
use oil in the blast furnace, and 
the only answer I can give them 
is the following: Solid carbon 
plays a very Important role, es- 
pecially in the upper level of the 
blast furnace shaft. Its function, 
especially with the fine ores, is 
largely to limber up the charge 
and allow the flow of gases to 
penetnte the charge evenly; be- 
sides incandescent carbon has cer- 
tain functions to perform in the 
blast furnace, which are of a 
chemical nature, and which need 
not be discussed in this paper. If 
coke 01 charcoal should be entirely 
replaced by oil in the blast fur- 
nace, the blast furnace charge 
would very likely become too 
dense to allow the combustion 
gases to escape freely. Besides, 
it seems to me, there would be 
considerable danger from explo 
sions if oil should be used as a 
fuel in blast furnaces. However, 
I think it may be possible to re- 
place part of the solid carbon fuel 
with liquid fuel, but am not pre- 
pared to state at this time what 
percentage of liquid fuel could be 
used, or what mechanical arrange- 
ments should be introduced for 
the use of liquid fuel in the blast 
furnaces. 

Alfred von der Ropp, 
Supt. Selby S. & L. Co. 



Pacific States Mining and 
Investment Company. 

Attends to all corporation mat- 
ters. 

Incorporates under laws of any 
state. 

Good propositions wanted re- 
ferring to mining, agricultural or 
industrial projects. 

Takes over entire stock issues 
for sale. 

Has agents, brokers or own 
offices in all principal cities of 
America and Europe. 

Special facilities for furnishing 
French, Spanish or German re- 
ports and maps of mines and 
lands. 

Gold bonds furnished to facili- 
tate sale of stocks. 

Stock issues underwritten on 
the American or London plan. 

Correspondence solicited and 
careful attention paid to all in- 
quiries. 

Money loaned and interest bear- 
ing investments furnished. 

Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific States Investor," an up-to- 
date financial paper. 

Address for all information, 

Pacific States Mining & In- 
vestment Co., 324-326 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



UNION OIL COMPANY. 



A California Corporation That Has Achieved 
Pronounced Success. 



Controls 200,000 Acres of Proven Oil Land, Has 300 

Miles of Pipe-Line, Operates Two Refineries, and 

Has a Fleet of Tank Vessels and Steamers. 



The Union Oil company has 
produced, bought, sold, refined 
and transported millions of barrels 
of crude petroleum. 

For years it has been the main 
oil operator in the State. It is the 
oldest company in the State, and 
since its organization it has oper- 
ated extensively in every field in 
California where oil has been de- 



the fullest sense of the term, and 
its growth has kept pace with the 
development of the State's oil in- 
dustry. Starting in a compara- 
tively small way it has grown as 
the oil industry has grown until it 
owns oil lands, pipe-lines, storage 
facilities, tank cars, barges, steam- 
ers and sailing vessels, the total 
value of all of which exceeds the 




The Union Oil Company's 55,000-Barrel Tank at Kikei, Hawaiian Islands. 



veloped sufficiently for commer- 
cial and refining purposes. 

It is a California corporation, 
managed by men brought up in 
the business from its earliest his- 
tory in the State, and California 
has furnished the capital on which 
it has been operated. 

It is a California concern in 



vast sum of $50,000,000. 

It has secured land in the prov- 
en oil districts of the State com- 
prising over 200,000 acres. This 
land is located in the choicest por- 
tions of the Los Angeles, Orange, 
Ventura, Kern, Fresno, San Ben- 
ito and other fields. 

It has constructed over 280 



miles of pipe-line running from 
the oil fields of Ventura and Los 
Angeles counties to the sea-ports 
of Ventura and San Pedro, where 
it has extensive tankage facilities 
and wharfage for its lines of tank 
steamers and sailing vessels. It 
has extensive pipe-lines at Coal- 
inga and at Bakersfield, where it 
also has great storage tanks. It 
owns a great number of tank cars 
which number it is constantly in- 
creasing, so that from these inter- 
ior points of oil production it can- 
not suffer from shortage of tank 
cars as those do who have not 
their own cars. 

It has steel tankage for over 
1,000,000 barrels, and its reservoirs 
will hold 4,000,000 barrels, which 
will soon be increased to 5,000,000 
barrels. 

There is a strong probability 
that the Union Oil company will 
also add to its pipe-lines by the 
building of, perhaps, two other 
lines from the interior to the sea — 
one from Bakersfield through the 
Sunset fields to the coast, and 
another from Coalinga through 
the coming great Fresno-San Ben- 
ito district to the coast at Moss 
Landing. In this respect the com- 
pany is non-committal, and will 
neither affirm or deny reports as 
to its intentions in regard to these 
lines. It is known, however, that 
the company has sought contracts 
with producers of such a nature 
as would indicate it had in view 
in the not distant future pipe-line 
enterprises of great magnitude, 
which, when carried out, would 
place oil districts that are now suf- 
fering from and retarded by in- 
sufficient rail transportation facili- 
ties in a position to ship their pro 
ducts cheaply, quickly, and in 
large quantities. The giant strides 
taken by the company in the last 
two years warrant the belief that 
no enterprise is too great or too 
costly to be undertaken when the 




The Union Oil Company's Barkentine Fullerton. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






company once makes up its mind 
that such an enterprise would fa- 
cilitate Its vast and rapidly-grow- 
ing business, and place it in a po- 
sition to handle more advantage- 
ously and cheaply the rapidly- 
growing oil output and the corres- 
pondingly increasing demand. 

The company is not only a large 
purchaser of oil In various dis- 
tricts, but is in itself a large and 
rapidly-increasing producer. 

In the oil fields of Los Angeles, 
Fullerton, Ventura, Kern and else- 
where it has over 300 producing 
wells. It has a large number of 
rigs constantly at work in all the 
proven fields steadily and system- 
atically drilling new wells, and, in 
the outside districts, where the 
geological conditions point to a 
possibly yet undiscovered supply of 
oil, its dri Is are at work slowly 
but surely proving the truth or 
falsity of Nature's story, written 
on the rocky hill-sides. 

REFINERIES. 

Besides selling crude oil to 
others, it is a vast consumer of its 
own product. 

At Oleum, on the shores of San 
Francisco bay, in Contra Costa 
county, the Union has a refinery 
able now to refine over 1,000 barrels 
a day of crude oil, and having this 
capacity constantly enlarged, asthe 
demand for its product increases. 
This refinery uses only the light 
oil from Ventura county, as this is 



better adapted for refining, for il- 
luminating and kindred purposes. 

At Bakcrsfield. within the last 
thiee months, anothei refinery has 
just been completed by the Union 
for refining the heavy Hakersfield 
oil for asphalt. This refinery has 
also a capacity of 1,000 barrels of 
crude daily, and, from its ware- 
houses are being shipped thous- 
sands of tons of first-quality as- 
phalt to be used in making the 
streets and sidewalks of eastern 
cities, which have just begun to 
realize the value and utility of 
California asphalt for these pur- 
poses, and which from now on 
will look to the Pacific coast for 
the product of petroleum, which 
is to take the place of cobble- 
stones, basalt blocks and maca- 
dam in the cities of the East and 
middle West. 

In introducing its asphalt pro- 
duct the Union Oil company is 
using every endeavor to show the 
superiority of California asphalt 
over all other pavement, and the 
success it is meeting in this re- 
gard means a great and rapidly- 
increasing output of crude petro- 
leum, which will add much to the 
returns received by the California 
oil producers. 

OIL FOR GAS-MAKING. 

From the Coalinga field the 
Union now transports to the bay 
many thousand barrels of a light 
oil that is peculiarly adapted for 



gas-making purposes, being found 
superior for that purpose to any 
other oil yet produced in the 
State. The demand for this oil is 
rapidly increasing, as the different 
gas companies recogni/e Its pecu- 
liar adaptability for their pur- 
poses. 

gXPOKTDTO OIL. 

As the output of California oil 
increased from year to year the 
I'nlon was one of the most enter- 
prising of all operating companies 
to find a market and create a de- 
mand for the product. 

Early last year it set on foot 
plans which would result in the 
complete usurpation of oil over 
coal as fuel in the Hawaiian isl- 
lands. How these plans were suc- 
cessfully carried out is now well 
known as an accomplished fact. 

Up to two months ago the con- 
I sumption of coal in the islands 
amounted annually to nearly 300,- 
000 tons. 

Of the eight islands comprised 
in the Hawaiian group, the follow- 
ing are the ones where sugar 
producing is carried on: Ha- 
waii, Maui, Ohau and Kauai. 
The island of Hawaii is as large 
as the other three combined, with 
Hilo as its principal port. On 
this island there is an abundant 
supply of water for irrigation, and, 
consequently, it has been the ban- 
ner island for the growth of the 
sugar cane. On the other Islands 



tained with some diffi- 
culty, and many of the plantations 
inve costly pumping plants, with 
which water is obtained from deep 
wells for irrigation purposes. In 
the sugar mills the refuse cane is 
used for fuel and for furnace use 
In the mills. There is no demand 
for fuel oil, but the pumping 
plants, which run for several 
months each year, and consume 
large quantities of fuel, create a 
necessity for a plentiful and cheap 
fuel. 

In order to supply this demand 
the Union Oil company has placed 
tankage in the several islands ag- 
gregating over 300.000 barrels. 
The company's contracts call for a 
delivery of 2,000 barrels per day, 
an equivalent per year of 730,000 
barrels, the contracts to run for a 
long term of years. 

In order to supply this vast 
amount of oil at such a distance 
from the California oil fields the 
Union company has constructed 
the largest wooden vessel ever 
built on this coast. 

She is the Fullerton, a four- 
masted barkentine, 270 feet long, 
with a 42.5 beam, a depth of 21 
feet, and a displacement of 4,600 
tons. The hold is divided into 
sixteen immense wooden tanks, 
each of which has a capacity of 
1,000 barrels. The cost of her con- 
struction was in the neighbor- 
hood of $175,000. She is a fast 




>>';> 

.?:*::;. 












Wells of the (.laremont Oil Company, in Kern River, owned by tie Union Oil Company. 



28 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



sailer, and her first trip to the isl- 
lands was begun on Monday, Aug- 
ust 18, 1902. She makes the round 
trip in from forty to forty-two 
days. 

The Union proposes keeping 
roo,ooo barrels of oil constantly in 
storage at Honolulu, while the 
balance of the tankage capacity 
will be divided among the other 
sugar-growing islands of the 
group. 

In addition to the Fullerton, 
the Union will soon have four 
tank steamers for use in the Ha- 
waiian and other long-distance 
trade. These steamers will have 
a capacity of from 10,000 to 15,000 
barrels each. A fifth tank steam- 
er, with a capacity of 2,000 bar- 
rels, will be built for use on San 
Francisco bay, the main purpose 
being to supply vessels and tanks 
on wharves with crude oil. 

Of these steamers, the Argyle, 
30,000 barrels, will be ready for 
service about the middle of this 
month, and the Whittier, to be 
used in the coast trade, will be 
ready in March. 

The coast trade in crude oil for 
fuel purposes is growing very rap- 
idly, and in this trade the Union 
is taking a very important part. 
Last month it began regular ship- 
ments by sea to Portland, Ore., 
her barge, the Santa Paula, car- 
rying thither her first cargo to 
that port of 8,200 barrels. This is 
but a beginning of the coast trade 
so far as the Union company is 
concerned. Before the close of 
1903 the company expects to be 
shipping by tank steamers and 
sailing vessels an average of at 
least 4,000 barrels of crude oil per 



day to points across the Pacific, 
and to the leading supply points 
north and south on the coast from 
Alaska to Central and South 
America. 

It should be remembered that 
the Union Oil company, which is 
developing such a market for Cal- 
ifornia crude oil, is a California 
corporation, headed by men who 
have lived their lives in the Gold- 
en State; that the capital back of 
the enterprise is California capi- 



ital, and that the success of its 
great enterprises means added 
wealth to the State, which will be 
confined to and expended in the 
State. In fact no California cor- 
poration has achieved greater suc- 
cess in years in any line of busi- 
ness than the Union Oil company, 
and its enterprise and progress- 
iveness in the face of most power- 
ful and sharp competition merit 
great praise and congratulation. 
The company has two main of- 



fices — one in San Francisco, the 
other in Los Angeles, the former 
being the headquarters of the 
sales and manufacturing depart- 
ment. 

The officers of the company are 
Lyman Stewart, president; Fred 
J. Rindge, vice-president; W. A. 
Carney, secretary; W. L. Stewart, 
general manager; John Baker, Jr., 
manager of manufacturing and 
sales department and of water 
transportation. 










Oil From Jewett & Blodgett Wells, Sunset District. 



INVESTIGATION EM INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Eern County, Cal., situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present operations is in famous Section 2, Township ri, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Well No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 cents A SHARE 



WILL LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that you act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value ji.oo) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock, and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment. We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member alifornia Petroleum Miners' Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and PostofEce Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

ELK BORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 



470-471-472 Parrott Building 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






FOREIGN CAPITAL. 



twenty teres, It was at once sold been made to drill in all thirteei 

to a new company of French and wells as soon as possible. 

Kngllsh capitals ted un- The parent company originally 

ier the laws of Great Britain, purchased or rather obtained the 

French and English Capitalists Invest in who are now going ahead most cptlonon the land fromjewett& 

Sunset Oil District. ptdltiotuUy with further de- Blodgett. Tlii- company not only 

velopment work. The company gave them the option, but also 

is called the Alameda oil com- .ijjreed to purchase all the oil that 

Companies Already Organized and More Will Be 

Formed to Develop Quickly and Profitably Oil Land 

in the Great and Prolific Sunset Oil Held. 



Less than a year ago some gen- 
tlemen, well informed as to east- 
ern and foreign oil fields, and fa- 
miliar with geological indications 
of subterranean petroleum de- 
posits, visited California to exam- 
ine the different oil districts, and 
make a selection of territory 
where a forelgu syndicate could 
pro6tably invest a large amount 
of capital, and aid in the develop- 
ment of an oil district. 

Nearly all of the oil districts of 
California were visited, and final- 
ly it was decided to obtain options 
on a large tract of land in Sun- 
set district near the refinery of 
Jewett & Blodgett, and not far 
from the present terminal of rail- 
road transportation. 

The land on which the options 
were obtained was located in dif- 
ferent sections, and all of it was 
believed to be rich in oil. The 
company had the privilege to buy 



this land outright at a certain 
price, in certain quantities, and 
within certain periods of time 

The company as thus formed 
was called the Petroleum Oil Fields- 
of Kern county, Limited. 

It was composed of English and 
French capitalists, the French 
probably having the larger finan- 
cial interests. 

A tract of twenty acres was se- 
lected and chosen in section 13, 
township 11, range 24, and drill- 
ing operations were begun at 
once. The company purchased a 
first-class rig, secured the services 
of a competent superintendent, 
and were fortunate in choosing 
Mr. L. Aubert as the representa- 
tive and manager of their inter- 
ests. A good well, having a pro- 
ductive capacity of 150 barrels a 
day, was obtained at a little over 
800 feet. 

Having proved this tract of 




The Alpha Well of the Alameda Oil Company, Sunset. 



pany, Limited, and their well, | 
being the first one drilled by 
the Petroleum Oil Fields of Kern 
county, Limited, is called the Al- 
pha well. Two more wells have 
been started, and are now being 
drilled, and two more will be com- 
menced immediately. Plans have 



might be produced on the land for 
a period of years at a price which 
should be a certain advance over 
the regular market price. This 
agreement, made by such a respon- 
s ; ble firm, assures the holders of 
the laud — the producers — imme- 
diate and satisfactory returns for 




Wells of the Superior Oil Company, on 2, 11-24, Sunset District. 



3° 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



their product, and relieves them of 
the labor and anxiety of hunting 
a market and obtaining a good 
. price. 

The Alameda company is capi- 
talized for ,£60,000, with shares of 
a par value of 4s. A pipe-line is 
already constructed from the wells 
to the refinery, about a mile dis- 
tant. 

The first well cost the company 
$6,000. The other wells will cost 
less. The company has enough 
working capital all paid in to 
drill the entire thirteen wells pro- 
posed, and the money fro n the 
sale of oil can be used for the im- 
mediate payments of dividends. 

The Petroleum Oil Fields of 
Kern county., _ Limited, having 
sold its first tract of twenty acres 
to the Alameda company, is now 
drilling a well on another twenty- 
acre tract in T2, 11-24, and is now 
down over 500 feet on this well. 

The Sedalia and California Oil 
company- is another company the 
stocV-of which is held largely by 
French investors. T ne land iD 
this company is in iS, n-23. Four 
wells are corop'eted and the fifth 
is being drilled. The derricks for 
Nos. 6 and 7 are in course of con- 
sumption.- The oil output from 
the four wells is about 300 
barrels, and the company has its 
own pipe-line. The company is 
capitalized at $250,000 and two 
dividends of 2 cents a share have 
already been declared. 

NEW DEVICE. 



Win. Plotts Patent Method Sop 
Oil Wells. 

Wm. Plotts has just been grant- 
ed a patent on his process for shut- 
ting off water from oil wells, which 
has been pending for a year or so. 
Some of the Whittier oil producers, 
says the News, have a fair know- 
ledge of the process from observ- 
ing its application on the Murphy 




Wells of Monarch Oil Company, Sunset District. 



Oil company's wells, where it has 
been applied for the last two years 
with complete success. The dif- 
ficulty of shutting off water has 
been the greatest cause of anxiety 
to California oil producers, many 
valuable wells having been aban- 
doned from inability to shut off 
the water, but by the Plotts pro- 
cess it can be done as certainly 
and with as little guess work as 
the operator can locate his break- 
fast. The method is as follows: 

The well is drilled wet, i.e., with 
the hole full of water. This pre- 
vents the softer shales from squeez- 
ing the casing and makes the well 
"be good"; that is, prevents it 



from filling up and flowing before 
it is finished. The well is drilled 
through the oil without attempting 
to shut off the water, after which 
the conditions must be ps follows: 
The strings of casing must be 
carried as far as it is desired to 
shut off the water. The inner one, 
which is to remain in the well, 
must be strong enough to resist 
the pressure against the outside 
where it is emptied. The other 
one must not be allowed to get 
stuck, and when it is completed, 
all but shutting off the water, the 
outer casing is mounted on a jig- 
ger of timber,or othermeans taken 
to impart a vertical motion, a stream' 



of water is introduced between the 
two casings, and screened sand or 
other suitable material is intro- 
duced slowly into the same place 
until a sufficient quantity is car- 
ried down to the bottom of the 
outer casing, where the shale or 
other caving material brought 
down by the action of the casing 
will have formed a bridge. The 
process requires much care, and as 
much as half a day of time should 
be given it. After the sand is all 
administered, the water and mo- 
tion should be continued for sev- 
eral hours, if the well is a deep 
one, to insure the sand all going 
down and to prevent it from 
"freezing" the two casings togeth- 
er. The outer strings of casings 
can then all be removed as the 
well only requires the one string. 

The agitation of the flowing 
water and the casing in the sand 
causes the coarser particles to set- 
tle to the bottom, the next in size 
higher up, and so on, with the fine 
sand on top, the pressure above 
then acts as a valve and causes 
the hard sand to adhere to the 
walls and make a bridge that noth- 
ing will move. 

Sometimes there is plenty of 
suitable sand in the well, which 
the agitation of the casing works 
down to the proper place, but the 
basis of the bridge must be of 
sand, gravel or" other hard material 
to prevent Its freezing out. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

LOMA PRIETA PRUNE RANCH COMPANY- 
Principal place of business, San Francisco. 
Location of ranch, Monterey County, California. 
Notice —There is delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of the assessment 
levied on the ioth day of November, 1902, the sev- 
eral amounts set opposite the names of the re- 
spective stockholders. 

SHARES AMOUNT 

Geo. J. Bucknall 5 $25 to 

Eliz. C. Culver," Ex't'x 10 5000 

C. T. Deane I 500 

James Jerome 2 ro 00 

Jas. R. Muirhead 2 ro 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors made on the ioth day of Nov- 
ember, rgo2, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public 
auction at the office ot Madison & Burke, 30 
Montgomery St., San Francisco, California, on 
Friday, the 9th day of January, 1903. to pp.y the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

FRANK MORTON, Secretary. 




Potomac Wells Mirrored in Oil — Kern River. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Sj 



PEERLESS OIL COMPANY. 



One of the Most Successful Now Operating 
In Kern County. 



Has a Large Acreage of Proven land, Has Excellent 

Management, and Is Always Prepared To Make 

a Satisfactory Report as to Its Affairs. 



The standing and success of an 
oil company depends upon two 
things: First, the quality and ex- 
tent of its lands as oil territory; 
secondly, the character and enter- 
prise of its management. 

Of all the companies operating 
in the Kern River oil fields, or in 
the State of California for that 
matter, no one of them has been 
more successful or stands higher 
in the estimation of its stockhold- 
ers, of the general business com 



H. C. Park, secretary; Gurdon 
Bradley, assistant secretary. 

Frotu the earliest beginning of 
development work the operations 
of the company have been con- 
ducted carefully and in a busi- 
nesslike way. The moneys re- 
ceived and the moneys expended 
could always be accounted for to 
any stockholder or to any possible 
investor in stock, and in fact to 
the public generally, 

The books of the company have 



pumping jack which enables it to 
pump all Its wells continuously 
and economically. It has three 
cement storage tanks which have 
a total capaci'.y of 67,000 barrels. 

Until about a year ago the com 
piny had sold a large part of its 
output to the United Oil 
ducers. A year ago, however, the 
company found itself called upon 
to take over to itself the business 
of the United Oil Producers, to- 
gether with all their contracts for 
furnishing oil to consumers all 
over the State. This meant also 
the taking over of the plants 
i which the United Oil Producers 
had established at such important 
distributing points as Oakland, 
Stockton and San Jose, as well as 
other distributing points in San 
Francisco and elsewhere. 

For the last year the company 
has successfully carried on the 
business of selling oil, have filled 
all old contracts, and have made 
many most advantageous new con- 



at work so that the company will 
soon have wells in reserve to en- 
able it to furnish any desired 
at of oil. 

The company is now paying 
regular dividends of ten cenls a 
share, and by the first of April, it 
not before, the dividends will be 
increased to twenty-five cents a 
share. 

The stock, which originally sold 
at one dollar per share, is now 
selling at thirteen dollars a share, 
and is hard to obtain at that fig- 
ure, as the holders of this stock 
are fully satisfied with it, and do 
not desire to sell at any figure. 

In order to show the condition 
of this company, we publish the 
last annual report to the stock- 
holders, and suggest that the ex- 
ample of the Peerless Oil com- 
pany, in making such a full and 
complete statement of its affairs, 
be followed by other oil com- 
panies, and especially by those 
who up to the present time have 




Some of the Wells of the Peerless Oil Company, Kern River District. 



munity, and of those interested in 
the production and consumption 
of oil, than the Peerless Oil com- 
pany. 

This company was organised In 
October, 1899. It was capitalized 
at $1,000,000 — 100,000 shares of 
the par value of $10.00 each. A 
wise selection was made in the 
choice of land, the company being 
fortunate enough to secure an 
entire quarter of section 31, ad- 
joining the wells of the Monte 
Cristo on the south, of the Ster- 
ling on the north, the Kern Oil 
company on the east, and Green 
and Whittier on the west. Every 
foot of this land is oil land, and 
its present worth cannot be esti- 
mated. Probably a value of $3,500 
per acre would not be out of the 
way. 

The officers and directors of the 
Peerless Oil company are John M. 
Wright, president; Jacob H. Neff, 
vice-president; Z. S. Cather, Hon. 
James G. Magulre, Ed. Coleman, 



always been open, and there has 
been no attempt or no desire to 
conduct the affairs of the company 
secretly or to seek to cover up 
any of its methods or modes of 
procedure. 

The first development work was 
attended with great difficulty ow- 
ing to the fact that at the time it 
was impossible to obtain other 
than a rig which was entirely In- 
adequate so far as strength was 
concerned to reach oil sand. This 
rig was finally abandoned, and a 
new and powerful rig obtained 
with which the first well of the 
company was drilled successfully. 
Since then development work has 
gone steadily onward until at the 
present time the company has six- 
teen completed wells, and will 
soon have three more completed 
if they are not already finished by 
the time this paper reaches the 
public. 

The Peerless company has a 
complete pumping system and a 



tracts. 

On December 1 the management 
of the Peerless company announced 
that it had made an advantageous 
arrangement with the Standard 
Oil company by which the Peer- 
less had turned over to the Stand- 
ard all of its distributing plants, 
all its contracts, old and new, and 
that on the first of January it 
would cease being a seller of oil, 
so far as hunting and maintaining 
an outside market was concerned. 

The management states that the 
Standard has agreed to purchase 
from the Peerless company oil to 
the amount of 5,000 barrels a day 
for a period of five years at a price 
not less than twenty cents a bar- 
rel at the wells. 

The Peerless has now a regular 
output of 3,000 barrels a day, and 
is drilling enough wells to enable 
it to furnish easily the necessary 
amount of 5,000 barrels a day. 
After this amount is obtained, one 
rig at least will be kept constantly 



not seen fit to make public the 
affairs of their several corpora- 
tions. 

The report of the Peerless Oil 
company is as follows: 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

We have three good water wells on our 
property which furnish sufficient water 
for all our present purposes. 

We are pumping oil from fourteen 
wells, namely, Nos. r, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
n, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16. 

Nos. 3 and 5 were never completed 
properly and are now dead wells. At an 
early day they will be replaced by new 
wells bearing the same numbers. 

On October 12th (yesterday) the daily 
product of our fourteen producing wells 
was given by our superintendent as 
follows: 

No. J, 275 bbls. ; No. 2, 20 bbls. ; No. 4, 
300 bbls.; No. 6, 250 bbls.; No. 7, 300 
bbls.; No. 8,300; No. 9, 150; No. 10, 300; 
No. 11, 200 bbls.; No. 12, 225 bbls.; No. 
13, 225 bbls.; No. 14, 150 bbls.; No. 
15, 108 bbls.; No. 16, 225 bbls. Total, 
3,oj8 bbls. 

We are not drilling any new wells at 
present. 

We have three reservoirs near the 
southeast corner of our property. The 



32 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






capacity of No. I is about 12,000 barrels, 
and that of Nos. 1 and 3, 28,000 barrels 
each. 

During the year ending with Septem- 
ber 30th, our wells produced 711,168.42 
barrels, of which 24,612 barrels were 
used in our operations at Peerless wells 
and 686,556.42 barrels were sold for the 
gross price of $135,887.06. 

Our power plant No. 1 consists of 
three boilers each of 30 horsepower. 

Our power plant No. 2 consists of 
three boilers each of 70 horse-power. 

Our pipe-line to the railroad is con- 
nected with reservoir No. 1 and our 
loading rack at siding No. 2 (Peerless 
siding) enables us to load fifteen cars at 
one time. 

We have constructed a good house for 
our superintendent at a cost of $2,170.56. 
Excepting the small house formerly oc- 
cupied by our superintendent, all our 
remaining houses were erected for tem- 
porary use. At an early day they are to 
be replaced by better buildings. 

May 1st we purchased and took over 
the business of Dnited Oil Producers. 
This business enables us to dispose of 
considerable quantities of oil in addition 
to the oil we are delivering regularly to 
Pacific Coast Oil company. 

The storage and delivery plant pur- 
chased for the u c e of'our sales depart- 
ment has cost us $19,150 and a fund of 
over $20,000 is required in its business. 
So far the profits of this department 
have gone in the building up of this 
fund and in paying for said storage and 
delivery plant. Stockholders will ob- 
serve that the storage and delivery 
plant is a tangible asset and that the 
amount of the sales department fund is 
in the form of cash belonging to the 
company; and as soon as the sales de- 
partment has taken up all its notes, its 
profits will be added to our dividend 
fund. 

Numerous "offers" have been made 
for Peerless property. Whenever we 
receive a favorable offer in tangible 
form it will be reported to our stock- 
holders. 

We have refused at all times to enter 
into combinations with other companies. 
The event appears to justify our course 
in this respect. 

The condition of our affairs is best 
shown by our trial balance for Septem- 



ber 30, looa, which sets forth also our 
assets and liabilities. 
Very respectfully, 

John M. Wright, President. 



BALANCE SHEET. 

eal estate $765,480,00 

orage and De 

livery plant 19, 150.00 

ermanent iui- 
P provements .... 110,590.7 

Water wells, Nos. 

1, 2 and 3, $ 3,620.37 

Oil -wells, Nos. 1 

to 4 and 6 to x6 

inclusive 66,756.78 

(Oil well No. 5 

charg'd to Profit 

and 1,05s ac- 
count). Oil well 

No. 17, now No, 

4. Oil wells 18 

to 22, inclusive, 

(derricks) 3,803.61 

Power pi ants, 

Nos. 1 and 2.. .. 7,742.12 
Pipe-line and load- 
ing racks 9,839.22 

Tankage 14,26966 

Buildings 4,5f 4 00 110590-76 

Personal property 36,641 15 
Tools and ap- 
paratus 22,71964 

Drillingrigs (3).. 9502.10 
Office furniture.. . 352.78 
Casing 4,066.63 3^,641. 15 



Money due to P. 
O. Co 

Dnited Oil pro- 
ducers 152.27 

Sovereign Oil Co. 3OO;0o 

Sales Depart- 
ment 21,261 86 2i. 714.13 



Cash in bank 

Total assets 

Expense accounts 

Operating ex- 
pense 65.350.20 

Salaries 20,386.66 

General expense ; 17.009.03 102,745 89 

Promotion ex- 
pense 



963.232.65 
56S.75I 74 



166.005.85 

268.7M-74 



Dividends 

Profit and loss.... . 
I^oss on oil wells 

abandoned 7,983.16 

Loss on insolvent 

debtors 145.36 

Gain on sales and 

exchange casing 



29,000.00 
7.486.39 



8,128.52 
642.13 



7-486.39 



$1,268,470 78 



Capital stock 

Production 

Pipe-line rental... 

Liabilities 

Pay roll 1,066.25 

Sundry accounts.. 5,235.63 
Billspayable 31,500.00 38,701.88 



MAPS OF THE OIL FIELDS 



Showing all of the Companies, Wells, Tanks, 
Etc., in the Kern River,' Sunset, Midway, McKit- 
trick and Coalinga Fields. 

These Maps are brought up to date and are ab- 
solutely corrert. They are the only maps that 
show the condition of these fields as they exist 
to-day. 

These maps are Copyrighted by the publishers, 
Barlow & Hill, and can only be used by them and 
their authorized agent in San Francisco, The 
Pacific Oii, Reporter. 

PRICE LIST OF MAPS. 

Large Blue Prints, 25x25, single map . $1.50 
Large Blue Prints, 25x25, per doz. . . 15.00 

Small Maps, single map 25 

Small Maps per doz 1.50 

Small Maps, per loO ........ 10.00 

Small Maps, per 1,000 . 30.00 

Small Maps, each additional 100 . . . 15.00 

Maps in colors, printed to order, showing in red 
the holdings of any particular company. Folders 
and Prospectuses printed giving maps and show- 
ing location of company's property, with proper 
descriptive matter. 

The above can be obtained only from 

Barlow & Hill 

1501 19th St., Bakersfield 

or the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco, Cal. 




Wells of the Monte Cristo Oil Company, in 5, 29-28, Kern River District. 



PACIFIC OH. REPORTER 







View of an Rxtension of the I.o» Angeles lily District. 



THE LOS ANGELES FIELD. 

The Outlook Good for a Very Prosperous 

Future. 



The Bra oT Ruinous Competition Has Passed, and 

a Growing Market and Good Business 

Management Insure Prosperity. 



By Tbeophile Colville. 



The year of 1902 closes with the op- is to continue, and that the re-adjust- 
crators in this field resting content in ment of conditions in the oil industry 
the thought that the acute troubles of. generally is bound to safeguard the lo- 
the past year are not to be repeated; cal field. That this optimism may react 
that the present upward trend of prices ! later to the detriment of the oil produc- 



ers themselves ia probably to an extent 

true, and more particularly as the pres- 
ent satisfactory state i>f affairs in the 
field results rather from the operation 
of economic law than from any exceed- 
ing wisdom on the part of the oil op- 
erators themselves. 

Of the 1,042 producing wells in the 
1 Id 931 only have been operated dur- 
ing the last few months of the 
and some of the best producers were 
closed down altogether. At the close 
of 1901 the average of about 3,000 bar- 
rels per day for the year was being 
steadily maintained, while the present 
year is dying away with a daily average 
of nearly 1,000 barrels less than twelve 
months ago. About two years ago 
there was a surplus in the field of near- 
ly 200,000 barrels of oil, while today 
there is no surplus stock and only suffi- 
cient in the tanks and in storage to 
handle the business that is steadily in- 



ng all of the time This is a his- 
il loeal conditions during the past 
year in epitome. Prices now are hov- 
irotind 70 cents, and will go 
higher, and the cause for this satisfac- 
ondition is found in the fact that 
the depression of the industry evcry- 
compellcd producers to do what 
they voluntarily were not inclined to 
do — curtail production. With the re- 
duction of accumulated stocks, the in- 
ing demand for the product had a 
direct tendency to stimulate prices in 
accordance with the ordinary law of 
supply and demand, and today the oil 
producers arc facing what they indeed 
believe will be for them a Happy New 
Year. 

But the fact is not to be gainsaid that 
the operators might today have several 
hundredsofthousandsof dollars in their 
pockets had they displayed the same 
business aptitude and ability in the 







Forest of Derricks at Los Angeles. 



34- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



marketing of the product as is required 
in the conduct of any ordinary mercan- 
tile business of large and imposing mag- 
nitude. But, truth to tell, the history 
of the discovery and opening out of the 
Los Angeles oil field has been such as 
to segregate and differentiate it from 
all the other fields in the State. 

DISCOVERY OK OIL. 

There was little reason for surprise 
that oil should have been discovered 
in Los Angeles, the wonder being that 
it was- not discovered at a much 
earlier date. The surface indi- 
cations proclaimed t-e under- 
lying wealth, and even in the early days 
of the puebla La Brea rancho gained 
its name from the large pools of liquid 
asphaltum, from which the original set- 
tlers obtained the necessary material 
for roofing their modest homes after 
the fashion taught them in the first in- 
stance by the Mission padres. For many 
years the small deposit of brea on what 
is now known as West State street, 
near Douglas street, was drawn upon 
by the scattered residents for fuel, and 
that was the vicinity where the firs'- 
oractical effort was made to strike oil. 
In 186.3, however, Mr. Baker of the Ba- 
ker block, who was one of the wealthi- 
est men in the community, took the 
initiative in drilling a well on what is 



capital, but were known among their 
immediate acquaintances as being men 
with ideas, and they were earnest in 
their belief that they could find oil. It 
was in 1892 that Doheny and Cannon 
began operations at the corner of Pat- 
ton and State streets, near the Second 
street park, and they themselves 
worked in the shaft until a depth of 150 
feet had been attained. A small rig, 
designed for water wells, was then ob- 
tained, and a seven-inch hole was be- 
gun, which was carried down to 225 
feet, at which point a vein of oil was 
tapped, and thereupon the petroleum 
industry of Los Angeles became an 
accomplished fact. The people of the 
city fully appreciated the importance 
of the discovery that had been made, 
for elsewhere in the State the oil fields 
were opening out. This we'd produced 
a small amount of oil for about three 
years, and though never a prolific pro- 
ducer, it served the purpose of demon- 
strating the presence of oil in the local 
field, and of arousing public interest in 
the industry that proved of immense 
benefit to the city. Doheny and Can- 
non brought into production a number 
of wells, but the market for oil had not 
then developed and oil became a drug 
to such an extent that they were ob- 
liged to turn their property over to 
their creditors. At later date these 



the Sister's Hospital, incited operators 
to renewed effort, and during the last 
three of four months of that year, 1897, 
over 100 wells were drilled in that new- 
ly developed portion of the local field. 
In 1898 continued development had 
carried operators to a point due north 
of Westlake Park, and it appeared as 
if the choicest residential part of the 
city was about to be invaded. Property 
owners appealed to the city council to 
stop the encroachments of the oil men 
in that direction, and finally a compro- 
mise was arrived at by which it was 
agreed that oil wells would not be 
drilled nearer than 75 feet to the sum- 
mit of the hill which lies north of the 
park. This prevented the invasion of 
the park, and left the drainage away 
from it, but, of course, could not and 
did not prevent the picturesque land- 
scape effect upon which Angelanos 
pride themselves from being marred 
by the erection of the line of derricks 
along the sky-line, as viewed from the 
park. 

It is needless to state in detail the 
various extensions made to the local 
field, suffice it to sav that at the present 
time it may be said to extend for four 
miles from Buena street running west 
to Hoover street with an average width 
of 400 feet; and for two miles approx- 
imately north and south, with an 




now known as 'Hoover street, between 
Seventh and the Wilshire boulevard. 
No oil was found and the interest in 
the matter, that had been stimulated 
into activity by the well that had been 
drilled on La Brea rancho lying west 
of the city in 1856-57 and the attempt 
that was then made to produce illu- 
minating oil from the crude product, 
died away. The company of associates 
that Mr. Baker gathered around him 
are reputed to have contributed $65,- 
000 for exploration work in the local 
field, and it is somewhat curious that 
only one well was sent down. In this 
connection it is interesting to surmise 
what caused this suspension of work 
while there' was a goodly amount of 
money remaining in the treasury, for 
just thirty-six years later, in 1899, some 
of the most prolific wells in the field 
were brought into production within 
1. 000 feet of the old pioneer well, in the 
college addition. 

It required the stimulus of the dis- 
coveries made in. other parts of the 
State to incite to systematic investiga- 
tion along practical lines in Los An- 
geles, and the pay streak was located 
hv 15. S. Doheny and George Cannon, 
both names to conjure with in the busi- 
ness world today, but at that time com- 
paratively unknown. They had little 



Los Angeles Wells near West Lake Park. 

same wells were a source of profit to 
their new owners. 

OPENING THE FIELD. 

With the presence of oil in commer- 
cial quantities demonstrated the inter- 
est in the new industry of the com- 
munity was \stimulated into activity, 
and the Second street oil field opened 
out with great rapidity. By the end of 
1893 there had been produced 100,000 
barrels of oil, and by the end of 1895 
there had been sent down more than 
300 wells within an area of about 90 
acres. The oil excitement throughout 
the state had been very great in 1900 
and that year has been unexampled 
for the taking up of oil lands and in 
the formation of companies. But not- 
withstanding this in 1894 the total pro- 
duct of the state was only 600,000 of 
which amount the Los Angeles field 
supplied 400.000 barrels, and a goodly 
proportion of the remaining 20 per 
cent of the total production was sup- 
plied from the Ventura county field. 

But in the meantime the work of 
prospecting had carried the oil field 
extension well to the eastward, until a 
break in the formation at Victor street 
prompted to investigation along a dif- 
ferent line. The discovery of oil to the 
east of Victor street, in the vicinity of 



average of nearly half a mile 
in width. WAthm this area there 
is a vast amount of unexploited 
territory, but this comprises the 
proven ground excepting the west- 
ern extension which is outside of the 
city limits though so immediately con- 
tiguous to it as to make it part of the 
Los Angeles field. Of this western 
territory little can be said save that to 
date it has not proven remunerative. 
It is also true, however, that by reason 
of the slump in prices work in this di- 
rection has been at a standstill. The 
fact that the Salt Lake Company has 
brought in five prolific wells, and that 
oil has been elsewhere obtained indi- 
cates clearly enough that the territory 
in the south-west, on the Santa Monica 
electric line holds . out promise of a 
rich return in the future. 

While it is true that much of the 
local ground remains to be developed 
a very little figuring will show that the 
Los Angeles field as at present defined 
within the proven area, and taking no 
consideration of the southwestern ex- 
tension, which is outside of the city 
and is yet unprospected, is very small 
when compared with other oil fields in 
the state. Without figuring too closely 
it represents less than a section and 
a half, in which there is some variation 



in the thickness of the oil stratum. 
SATURATION AND PRODUCT- 
IVENESS. 

In every oil field a question of para- 
mount importance is the possible limi- 
tation to the production of petroleum. 
To the mere layman it appears incom- 
prehensible how a stratum of lock, as 
compact in its formation as the oil 
sand generally appears to be can hold 
such enormous quantities of liquid. In- 
deed, in the^ early days of the industry 
in the Pennsylvania field it was gen- 
erally supposed that the oil collected 
if not in streams, at least in pools in 
underground caverns or crevices, as 
they were technically termed, and all 
paying wells were supposed to start 
from such fissures in the rock. That 
such fissures occur is quite true, for 
they often throw the tools out of plumb 
and start a "crooked hole," but that 
they are not a necessary adjunct to a 
paying well was proven long ago by 
Carll. After experimenting he showed 
conclusively that oil rock is capable 
of absorbing and holding from one- 
fifteenth to one-tenth of its own bulk 
of water or oil; this, too, when the 
pores of the rock are more or less 
clogged with residum from the oil 
previously held by it, and without it 
being charged under pressure. .Since 
then estimates have been made of the 
saturation of the oil sand in the various 
fields, and the amount of recoverable 
oil, with approximate correctness. So 
far as the Los Angeles product is con- 
cerned, it is to be remembered that it is 
a heavy oil, and that the gas pressure 
has never been very great. Estimating 
the thickness of the oil sand at 40 feet 
as an average, with a 10 per cent satu- 
ration, the. oil stratum of the proven 
area would contain, in round numbers, 
about 26,087.894 barrels of oil. Opinions 
differ regarding the percentage of this 
oil that has been and is being recover- 
ed. Considering all the facts, it may 
be well to accept the most conservative ' 
estimate that only about one-fourth of 
the amount of moisture as theoretical- 
Iv estimated is actually being produced. 
And this, too, of course, only applies 
to where development work is in pro- 
gress for while in some portions of the 
field there is a forest of derricks there 
are other places where they are sparse- 
lv scattered. The indications appear to 
be that after the wells have ceased to 
vield oil in large quantities they may 
still be made to produce small quanti- 
ties for an almost indefinite time. At 
present there are wells that have been 
yielding from one to three barrels a 
day for over a year, and are still pro- 
ducing at the same rate without any 
verv appreciable decline. 

Much of the oil territory is covered 
with buildings, and this is all the better 
for the wells closely adiacent. During 
the past year some interest was arous- 
ed among operators by the attempt on 
the oart of some of their number to 
reach a third oil stratum. All alone 
the line at the east end wells have been 
deepened, and one company, in carry- 
ing on this work, was firm in the be- 
lief that a third sand had in very truth 
been encountered. The record of the 
production of the T.os Angeles field, 
since 1893, is as follows: 

1893 100,000 

1894 400,000 

1895 900,000 

1896 1,200,000 

1897 1,400,000 

1898 1,182,000 

1899 1,200,000 

igoo 1 ,200,000 

TQOT 1,250.000 

1902 (estimated) 912,500 

The decline in the amount of produc- 
tion during the year of 1902. has not 
been owing to any falling off in the 
productiveness of the wells, but has 
been wholly owing to the curtailment 
of production made absolutely neces- 
sary bv the depressed condition of ,the 
oil industry generally, and the disorga- 
nized condition of affairs in the Los 
Angeles field. During the last month 
or two of the year the production has 
not ranged above 2.000 barrels per day. 

OUTSIDE DEVELOPMENT. 

Allusion has already been made to the 
oil bearing territory immediatelv con- 
tie-uous to the citv in the southwest, 
and which is practically a continuation 
of the city oil field. Without going far 
afield into the county, the development 
work being done in the Teiunga may 
be mentioned for the possibilities that 
'ie ahead in the event of oil being 
struck. Two wells are being sent down, 






just when 

to appear, the hole 

had to be abandoned 

Tcjunga, upon which these companies 

are operating is said to have bee:: 

pected and located by the 

who located the first well in 

on;and that the 
line in the Pico is a continuation oi that 
in the Tcjunga. but less well dctiu 
Russian Company has had great 
catty for several months past with 
water and cave*. The well has been car- 
ried down to about 1,200 icet, and 3 
small amount 01 high grade oil 
has begun to show. It is not possible 
to say (torn the few indications, what 
the result of this company's steady 
and persistent work in the face of most 
adverse circumstances will be, but in 
the event of oil being tapped similar to 
that obtained from the Pico wells, it is 
safe to say that a hundred derricks will 
soon decorate the hill sides in the Tc- 
junga canyon. 

To the nest of the Cahucnga 
the sedimentary rocks show metamor- 
phism and contain a few fossils which 
Dr. Cooper has referred to the Eocene 
period, and along the shore line 
west of Santa Monica, the rocks ex- 
posed are similar in appearance, and are 
supposed to belong to the same geo- 
logical horizon as the rocks exposed at 
Los Angeles. On the Malibu rancho 
evidences of petroleum have been very 
marked, and besides seepages, shale. 
sandstone, and conglomcratesgas blow- 
outs have been found; and. perhaps, 
the most important of all. black shale 
with seams of paraffine wax and lime. 
Assays of this, made by one of the at- 
taches of the State Mining Bureau, are 
said to have shown 71 ounces of paraf- 
fine to the ton. and from this showing 
it has been inferred that when oil is 
found it will have a paraffine base. In 
Carbon. Santa Cruz, and Decker Can- 
yons oil shale and rich seepages are 
very much in evidence, and experts 
have held the opinion that oil should be 
found at from 800 to 900 feet. Nearly 
all of the land not included in the Mali- 
bu rancho has been taken up, and the 
major part is owned by the directors ni 
the Los Angeles. San Pedro and Salt 
Lake road. 

While it has been realized that the 
time has not been ripe for exploiting 
this region on any large scale. Freder- 
ick H. Rindgc. owner of the Malibu 
rancho and a very wealthy man. under- 
took to do a little pioneer work. 

A drilling rig was installed and work- 
has been going on for about two 
months. The location selected is not 
the best that might have been chosen, 
the indication of oil being much better 
farther back in the country, but it is 
convenient to tide-water, and if a new 
field should onen up. this is the one 
feature that will make it of surpassing 
importance. Sometime ago, suit was 
begun by the United States Govern- 
ment to condemn 35 and one-half acres 
at Point Dume for the establishment 
of a fog and signal station. This land 
is on the Malibu rancho. and condemna- 
tion procedings have also been begun 
by the Government to obtain a tract of 
land at Canyada del Corral Viejo, to 
be used in building a wharf and con- 
structing a roadway to Point Dume. 
From this those interested in the 
develop ment of the region are 
taking comfort in the thought 
that when oil is developed in quantity, 
the transportation question will offer 
no difficulty. The product can be car- 
ried by pipe line from the field by 
gravity to tide-water. It is but right to 
say, however, that while this district 
will be watched with interest during the 
coming year, when it is believed that 
considerable development work will be 
done, the possibility of obtaining oil 
with a paraffine base is a thing hoped 
for rather than that it is to be a certain 
result when petroleum is obtained in 
quantity. Nevertheless, the facts as 
stated have been certified to by ex- 
perts of indisputable authority. 

A MISMANAGED MARKET. 

Jt is the veriest truism to say that 
the oil underlying the city of Los An- 
geles never would have been develop- 
ed if there had not been a market to 
absorb it. The crux of the whole oil 
industry is to so bring the product to 
the consumer that boththeproducerand 
the consumer mav make money, and in 
this the local operators have only been 
measureably successful. In 1898. when 
the practical use of oil. as a fuel began, 



id been 






A i 

any b 

d common 

tor the beni 

ean of oil was being devel- 
et for it. 
'lie refusal 

:de neccs- 
jtion. The 
ear companies in were ready 

and willing to contract to make deliv- 
ery at three or six months of any num- 
ber 01 cars, but the railroad companies 
did not place these orders, and 1 
suit was disastrous to the operators of 
Kern river. One result of this state of 
affairs was that brokers and jobTJcrs in 
es began tilling local orders 
with oil from north of the range, and 



then, 
hat the es- 
timate t right, that such an 
• I the mar- 
ket fallir 1 did. 

: into 

an ag: and Trans- 
portati 1 ir product 
and a of pro- 
ducers mel h to fix a 

But quite a number of opcrat- 



011 ur. 



mers 
ahead bj 
c new fuel. 

some 
the 

ear at cur- 

timr 

ng at the wells (or 60 1 

cents, and 
may be said to he in 
the latter figure there 

$1 a 

to be 

1 price 

■itsidcr 

i is to 

that in selling oil from 

his wells, he is drawing on a bank that 





Los Angeles Pumping riant — Pumping Twenty-Six Wells. 



the slump in prices in the local market 
followed. The production, that had 
gone on increasing from 1898, reached 
its highest point in 1901, notwithstand- 
ing these untoward conditions, and the 
congestion became so great that at one 
time there was a surplus at the wells 
and in storage of about 200,000 barrels 
of oil. 

The Producers' Association met 
each week, but without any measures 
being determined upon to meet the dif- 
ficulty confronting it. With certain ex- 
ceptions each individual operator ap- 
peared to be desirous of forcing upon 
the Association that particular idea 
which he considered a panacea for his 
particular and individual need. Nor 
was this altogether strange when the 
make-up of the local field is considered. 

The oil field opened out in the city 
itself, and in districts for the most part 
built up 'as residential neighborhoods. 
With such a good thing in sight as an 
oil well and every new thing is a good 
thing to the man that knows nothing 
about it. very many individual holders 
determined to hold the fabulous fortune 
stored beneath their garden lot for 
their own individual use, and proceeded 
to drill for oil themselves. Others 
associated themselves together in small 
companies, and the oil field was opened 
out by a vast number of individual 
property owners and small companies 
without a large amount of capital. But 



ors remained outside; they couldn't af- 
ford to lie themselves up in any way, 
however alight. They had to have 
money; money was their constant cry, 
and they had to have it. Prices sealed 
down as the surplus scaled up. It was 
no uncommon thing for an operator 1 
go to a broker and tell him that while 
he didn't want it known that he was 
selling oil so low. he was willing to let 
go on 1,000 barrels at such and such a 
price, if the trade could be put through 
at once, and without being made 
known. The seller had to have money 
and that was all there was to it. Con- 
siderable oil was sold at 25 cents a bar- 
rel, and inconceivable though it may be. 
1,000 barrel lots have been sold as low 
as 15 cents a barrel at the wells. Ol 
course, such a price did not anyway 
near pay [or production, but the ope- 
rator was caught in a tight place, and 
was compelled to let go. This Cain 
like attitude of the local operators con- 
tinued well inter the year 1902; each 
"lies hand was against his fellow in a 
business way; it was God for all and ih 
Devil take the hindmost. 

During the year now ended, however, 
two causes have operated to bring 1 
about a change for the better. For a j 
number of months there has been al- 
most a suspension of new work in the 
field, and consequently, the new pro- 
duction has been insignificant; and the 
market for oil has been expanding so ! 



has not got. an unlimited deposit. The 
lu'e of a well is limited, although 
producers have acted as if the contrary 
weir the case. In the early summer 
the Union Oil Company issued a state- 
ment to its stockholders in which the 
following suggestive words occur: 

"Oil can now be purchased at prices 
which scarcely exceed the cost of pro- 
duction, and our opinion is that within 
a comparatively short time, oil will 
considerably enhance in value, and al- 
though the company has large holdings 
of oil lands, aggregating more than 
100,000 acres, the Board of Directors 
deems it prudent to conserve the pro- 
duction of tin company as much as pos- 
lible for the higher prices which the fu- 
ture holds, and buy wdiile the low priced 
ml may be had." 

In this paragraph is contained the 
synthesis of worldly wisdom so far as 
ill.- ml industry is concerned, and 
when a local paper (The Herald) got 
hold of one of these private statements 
and published it, it had a decided effect 
in revealing to producers in the local 
held, the foolish policy they had been 
following. 

But the producers in Los Angeles 
would not feel so satisfied with the out- 
look, were it not that favorable condi- 
tions are attending the oil industry 
lly throughout the State. Lo- 
cally, 75 cents is regarded as the certain 
price in the very near future, and a safe 



36 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



price at that, because Kern river oil 
cannot be sold now for less than 25 
cents. With oil quoted at Bakersfield 
for 25 cents, the Los Angeles oil is 
fixed at 75 cents. 

REFINERY INTERESTS. 

The low price of oil gave an impetus 
to the business of refining until to-day, 
the money invested in this branch of 
the oil business is very large. At least 
two additional refineries would be run- 
ning in Los Angeles today were it not 
for the difficulties thrown in the way 
by the authorities, by making it almost 
impossible to obtain a suitable site. 
While it was the possibility of finding 
a profitable market for the asphalt that 
prompted the attention of moneyed in- 
terests to the refinery business, investi- 
gation showed that, with a more com- 
plete plant than that required for ex- 
tracting merely the asphaltum, by-pro- 
ducts could be obtained that would be 
also very profitable if they could be 
marketed. That was the rub — to find 
a market for the by-products. As a 
result of much labor and money ex- 
pended large shipments are being now 
made from Los Angeles to the east, 
and by-products are being sent all over 
the country, and as far over the sea as 
to Cuba and the Philippines. 

All of the refineries in the city are 
not now in operation, but the following 
six are given with their capacity: 
Hercules, (1,000 barrels); New Frank- 
lin, (850); Union Con.: ( ); Coombs, 
(2,000); Southern, (200); Pacific, (64). 

The crude petroleum from this field 
ranges from 12 degrees to 18 degrees 
gravity, and from the heavier oil is ob- 
tained an asphalt that is in constantly 
increasing demand. A test run was 
made at the New Franklin refinery 
quite recently on no barrels of IS de- 
gree gravity crude with the following 
result: 

Asphaltum, 33 per cent (99 6-10 pure). 
Heavy Distillate, 34 per cent (26 5-10 

gravity).. 
Green (Skid) Oil, 18 per cent. 
Engine stock, 10. per cent. 
Loss, 5 per cent. 
Total, 100 per cent. 

For a long time the Asphalt 
Trust obtained much of its asphalt 
from Southern California, and with this 
filled eastern contracts; but within a 
recent period it has become the custom 
in the east to decry the California pro- 
duct and exalt the Trinidad asphaltum 



as the product par excellence. It has 
been noteworthy, none the less, that the 
Trust in several instances used Califor- 
nia asphalt to fill contracts and passed 
it off as the Trinidad product. .But all 
of that is now outside of serious con- 
sideration for the Los Angeles asphal- 
tum has established its reputation, and 
all that the refineries can manufacture 
is meeting with ready sale. Indeed, at 
the present time the demand for asphalt 
is not nearly being met. 

As it can be manufactured at different 
points in the state at varying cost an 
attempt has been made to have 'refiners 
throughout the state maintain a sched- 
ule of prices. In Los Angeles the pop- 
ular grade of paving and roofing mater- 
ial has been held at $12 per ton, and 
none has been selling under that figure. 
It has been tentatively agreed, how- 
ever, that $2 a ton shall be conceded 
to the northern end of the state. How 
this plan may work remains to be seen, 
and there are those who aver that only 
along the lines of combination can a 
schedule of prices be maintained. 

The following list of by-products be- 
ing manufactured, and the uses to which 
they are put, is given in popular terms 
and without technicality: Tree Emul- 
sion, an insecticide for orchards; 
neutral oil, white, amber and extra 
heavy (manufacture of paints); cylinder 
oil, several grades for dynamo and en- 
gine purposes; journal oil, used largely 
by street railway companies; universal 
and castor oils, for heavy and light 
farm and other machinery; lubricating 
oil, engine stock, used for compound- 
ing; and the different grades of distil- 
lates used for making gas, in gas-en- 
gines, and as ordinary fuel. 

A deal was recently put through by 
a local jobber by which all of the low 
grade distillates from the city refineries 
will be placed. This means about 10,- 
000 barrels of distillate disposed of 
advantageously each month. It is 
reported that this arrangement 
went through, in part at least, 
owing to the contention of very 
high authority in the industry that one 
barrel of the distillate contains a much 
greater number of heat units than a 
barrel of crude. That a barrel of crude 
contains 42.000 heat units, and that a 
barrel of distillate contains just 14,- 
000 more. Theoretically, this is said to 
be true, but there are some expert re- 
fineries who aver that in order to prove 
such contention one has to juggle with 



figures. Be that as it may, it was on 
some such basis that the recent deal 
was made. 

CITY DAMAGES AND PROFITS. 

No one has ever ventured to deal with 
the Los Angeles oil field without ad- 
verting to the heavy depreciation of 
real estate by reason of the advent in- 
to the residential district of a multitude 
of oil derricks. This, too, notwithstand- 
ing that save in exceptional cases, there 
has been no loss to the property holder 
whatever. No property owner would 
have dreamed of drilling himself, or of 
leasing his front garden had he not felt 
reasonably sure of making money; and 
in most cases he has made enough to 
buy three or four such premises as he 
was occupying. As the wells become 
exhausted, too, the derricks disappear, 
the holes are filled fh, and once again 
the ground, after being despoiled of its 
underground wealth, appears as of old. 
That the beauty of the landscape is .de- 
stroyed might, perhaps, be conceded, 
but estheticism is not likely to be cul- 
tivated at such a sacrifice of money as 
the neglect of the oil industry would 
have required. 

To-day the value of the industry may 
be summed up somewhat as follows: 

1073 wells $1,235,460 

Tankage 272,680 

Pipe-lines 220,920 

Machinery 340,000 

$2,069,060 

These valuations are based on the as- 
sessment valuations made during the 
year. To estimate the value of the to- 
tal production of the field during its 
life is outside the bounds of possibility, 
but at least an industry which is re- 
ceiving a handsome return upon the 
money invested as given above stands 
as a very good offset to the individual 
instances of hardship, where there has 
been an actual and permanent deprecia- 
tion of real estate. In the coming year, 
the industry will expand. New uses are 
being found for the oil, and as the de- 
mand increases, the field work will in- 
crease. Many of the wells are yet in 
the first sand. These range from 850 
to 1,000 feet, and at about 1,350 feet the 
second sand is tapped whether a 
third sand exists or not, is matter of 
dispute among the operators, and it 
remains for the future experimental 



work to absolutely determine the full 
possibilities of the field. 

Theophile Colville. 
Los Angeles, Cat., Dec. 14, 1902. 



Thb Pacific Oil Rbporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



CALIFORNIA 
LIMITED 

to CHICAGO, Daily 



An ideal train 

for those 

who seek the 

best. 

SANTA FE TRAINS 



4\ 

Santa Fe 

% W 



Leave Market-Street Ferry Depot. 



Lv. S.Fran. 

Ar. St'kton 
" Merced 
" Fresno. 
" Han ford 
" Visalia. 
'• B'kfield 
" Kan. C. 
" Chicago 


Daily 

Local 


Daily 
Lim'td 


Local 
Daily 


Overl'd 
Daily 


8:00 a 
11:10 a 
1:20 p 

3:20 p 
5:00 p 
4:4s p 
7:10 p 


9:30 a 
I2:oS p 
1:40 p 
3:00 p 
3:5t p 

5:50 P 
2:31 p 
2:15 p 


4:20 p 
7:30 p 


8:00 p 
n:i5P 
1:2s p 
3:15 a 
7:50 a 
5:00 a 
7:35 a 
S:o2 a 
8:47 P 



a for morning; p for afternoon. 

8: a. m. Daily is Bakersfield Local, stopping at 
all points in San Joaquin valley. Corresponding 
train arrives at 7:50 a. m. daily 

0:30a.m. Daily is the "CALIFORNIA LIM- 
ITED," carrying Palace Sleeping Cars and Din- 
ing Cars through to Chicsgo. Chair Car runs to 
Bakersfield for accommodation of lucal first-class 
passengers. No second-class tickets arehonoied 
on this train. Corresponding train arrives at 11:10 
p. m. daily. 

4:20 p. m. is Stockton local. Corresponding 
train arrives at 11:10 a. m. daily. 

8:00 p. m. is the Overland Express, with through 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers, and free Reclining 
Chair Cars to Chicago; also Palace Sleeper, which 
cuts out at Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
at 6:00 p. m. d«ily. 

Offices— 641 Market Street and in Feriv Depot, 
San Francisco; 1112 Broadway, Oakland. 




The New Franklin Refinery. 



THB NEW FRANKLIN. 



One of the Most Prosperous Oil 
Refineries in the State. 

The Association of California Oil Re- 
finers recently formed in Los Angeles, 
has attracted wide attention, »nd is 
surely an important movement, in com- 
bining as it does the market interests 
of all those engaged in the refining of 
California Crude Petroleum. The new 
association is undertaking to regulate 
only the market on California asphalt, 
but already the benefit to be realized 
from such association agreement is be- 
ing felt, and with the increasing mar- 



ket for asphalt throughout the East, the 
members of this association are surely 
to be congratulated. Refiners of Cali- 
fornia Crude are kept busy night and 
day to fill orders that, once started, roll 
in with regularity, and this branch of 
the oil industry seems to be in most 
prosperous condition. 

Among the California refineries may 
be mentioned as one of the best known 
and most prosperous, the new Franklin 
Oil and Refining company of Los An- 
geles, and of whose plant we are enabled 
to publish a cut from a recent photo- 
graph. This refinery is located on the 
southern city limits of Los Angeles, im- 



mediately upou. the main line of the 
Santa Fe Railroad to Redondo, and hav- 
ing been in successful operation for sev- 
eral years past, is one of the well-known 
manufacturing enterprises of southern 
California. At the present time the 
Franklin Refinery is handling through 
its stills about 7,000 barrels of crude oil 
per month, and has a'ways orders ahead 
for its refined products. Asphalt from 
the Franklin Refinery is sold through 
Chicago and New York agencies, as well 
as locally, and the other products such 
as gasoline, distillates, and lubricating 
oils are sold through regular agencies in 
Arizona, Calfornia, and the Pacific 



Northwest. 

The Franklin is also manufacturing a 
line of roofing supplies, including 
paints, that finds a ready market. 

The New Franklin Oil and Refining 
company is certainly a prosperous and 
successful company, and may be right- 
ly considered among the strongest con- 
cerns in that line of business in the 
State. 

The plant is being enlarged to permit 
the storage of a greater quantity of crude 
oil than has been possible heretofore, 
and it is intended to add immediately 
one more asphalt still. The present sup- 
ply of crude oil for this refinery is being 
obtained almost entirely from the Los 
Angeles field. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTRR 



THE CAREAGA OIL FIELD. 

Here the Western Union Oil Company Hub 
A Great Property . 






A Dozen Wdls are Now Yielding High Gravity OH at 

the Rate ol Over Two Thousand Barrels a 

Day-The Output all Provided For. 



cut dis- 

- ' 

ipany is 

the ouipui ol the 

and at 

holders 



I Field, in 
nmy, seems 
•i the fore- 
oil-prodncing sections in C 
ilia 
This ornc out not alone by 

mincnt authority 
and i of tlic com- 

pany it -self, but by the successful devel- 



demand wherever 
' Among the i.; 

.1.1. which consumes large 
quantities annually. The lot i 

ill that the Pacific 

Railroad immediately afterward chug 
ed it > engines from coal to ml burners. 
witli most satisfactory results Since 




Refinery of Pacific Oil Transportation Company at Gaviota. 



cpment of oil on neighboring proper- 
taking in many miles. With a num- 
ber of wells in various sections, the 
Western Union property has been 
quite thoroughly exploited, and in every 
instance with most gratifying results. 

At the beginning of operations some 
three years ago, the company met with 
severe reverses and for a lime fears 
were entertained whether development 
. would be carried on to a success- 
ful outcome. The first well had been 
sunk to a depth of 2,000 feet, and the 
drillers were about to penetrate the oil 
sand when an earthquake twisted the 
casing and made further progress on 
the well impossible. The great expense 
incurred up to this time, made some of 
the promoters feel rather wary of put- 
ting down any more wells lest they 
should meet with a similar accident. 
The majority of the stockholders how- 
ever, had confidence in the project, and 
. p. rations continued until in Septem- 
ber, 1901. a strong flow of oil was en- 
countered. 

From that time on the field proved 
a bonanza, and the property today is 
rated in the millions. Over 15.000 acres 
comprise the Careaga ranch on wdiich 
the Western Union Company has the 
exclusive oil and mineral rights. On 
this properly at the present time 
there are ten wells under the pump, 
each one yielding from 300 to 400 bar- 
rels a day, while work on seven more 
i- progressing day and night. The 
wells attain depths ranging from 1. 500 
to _>.ooo feet, with an average of 1,650, 
The formation is mostly a Lin 
which varies in hardness. Quick- 
sands are occasionally encountered, but 
nol to any great extent. The time re- 
quircd to drill a well depends very 
much on the mal 

encountered, and style and size 01 
casing employed. Most of the wells 
air drilled by contract, and are gi 
llj completed in sixty days. The con- 
trad price for putting down a well 
ranges from $1.25 to $1.50 per loot 
, , ording to the depth that the driller 
i* required to 

The Western Union oil has a speci- 
fic gravity of .'4 degree. When the 

1 ., 1 fi rs | red and piped to 

Blake Station, two miles distant, it 

Howcd through a two inch pipe on 

gravity with only a very slight fall. It 

ptionally free from water and as 



then the Santa Maria Flour Mills have 
adopted the use of oil as fuel and find 
it superior to the use of either coal or 
wood, as well as decidedly cheaper. 
On large contracts the oil is sold for 
$1 a barrel, while in smaller contracts 
it brings as high as $1.10 per barrel. 
Aside also, from supplying the county 
with oil for road building, the com- 
pany furnished the neighboring oil 
companies with oil and gas for fuel 
purposes, which is piped for miles in 
all directions. 

The greater part of the oil produced, 
however, is pumped to Careaga Sta-jj 




A. Fairehild, C. A. Canfield, H. J. Crocker, W. A. Jacobs, Dr. C. T. Deaae 
and Fred Ilarkness at Western Union Well. 



shipped to the Hawaiian Islands and 
the Orient. 

The refinery, as well as the many 
miles of pipe-line through winch the 
oil is conducted has until recently 
been a part of an immense asphalt 
mining scheme, whereby the unlimited 
deposit of asphalt in the Sisquoc 
mountains was mined and reduced to 
a liquid state and with the aid of ben- 
zinc piped to Alcatraz, where it was 



of the Western Union Company, held 
n cently at Los Angeles, it was agreed 
ive the Pacific Oil Trasportation 
Company an option on the entire hold- 
ings up to April 1st, and the opinion 
among those in a position to judge, 
leads to the belief that the latter com- 
pany will avail itself of the opportunity 
to acquire this valuable property. 

Julius Ebel. 
Santa Maria. December 14, 1902. 



Oil-fired engines are being run for ex- 
perimental purposes on the London, 
Brighton and South Coast railway. They 
are burning liquid fuel (presumably Tex- 
as), which gives off no smell during com- 
bustion. The oil is stored in a galvanized 
iron tank, provided with a gas pipe, and 
placed in the tender. When the engines 
are in the stations care is taken by those 
in charge to prevent persons from seeing 
the liquid fuel burning arrangements. 
It is obvious that the company is con- 
ducting the experiments on most perfect 
nes. 



The Julia Luckenbach, the recently 
converted tank steamer, was the first 
vessel consuming fuel oil to leave New 
York. She was to make a trip to Sabine 
Pass, Texas, and will return with a cargo 
of Texas fuel oil. The capacity of this 
vessel is 4,000 tons. 



The new docks and depots were opened 
at Nancy on November 1st. Among 
other erections, reservoirs have been 
built for the storage of petroleum. These 
reservoirs have been erected on land 
apart from other buildings. 




Western Union Union Oil Wells on the Careaga Pancho, Santa Barbara County. 



38 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



DESERVE GREAT CREDIT. 



Success Attending the Operations of the 
Pacific Oil Transportation Company. 



Extensive Business Built Up in a Short Time at Home 

and Abroad— Immense Resources in Tankage, 

Pipe-Lines and Transportation Facilities. 



The youngest, perhaps, but by 
no means the least important of 
the large companies operating in 
oil in California is the Pacific Oil 
Transportation company, the main 
office of which is in San Francisco. 

As its name implies its main 
business is the transportation of 
oil, both crude and refined. 

Though organized scarcely a 
year ago, the company, backed 
by abundant capital, and handled 
by men of rare sagacity and busi- 
ness enterprise, has pushed 
rapidly to the front in the oil 



cities of the State, and to many 
consumers whose plants are scat- 
tered about in isolated places, 
some along the lines of the vari- 
ous railroads, and some about the 
bay shore, reached only by flat- 
bottomed, stern wheel steamers. 
It supplies oil to numerous 
steamers large and small, some 
running about the bay, others up 
and down the coast, others to far- 
away ports on the Pacific, such as 
the Enterprise, 4.000 tons, fuel 
capacity 3,000 barrels, running to 
Hilo, and the Mariposa, 3,158 




SOURCE OF SUPPLY. 

A tankage capacity of 240,000 
barrels, which capacity is being 
constantly increased as the con- 
sumption of fuel oil becomes more 
general, requires a great and in- 
creasing source of supply of crude 
oil. This the Pacific Transporta- 



transportation in the way of more 
tank cars. 

The main source of supply, 
however, is from the new and pro- 
lific Careaga field in Santa Bar- 
bara county where the Western 
Union company has already a doz- 
en wells and is drilling more as 




Tanks of Pacific Oil Transportation Company at Honolulu. 



Refinery and Landing of Pacific Oil Transportation Company at Gaviota. 



business and is now prepared to 
do and in fact is doing a business 
that a year ago would have seemed 
impossible to have been built up 
in a decade. But the vast pro- 
duction of oil in new as well as 
in old fields and the correspond- 
ingly rapid increase in the de- 
mand and in the consumption of 
the new fuel has brought about 
possibilities in the oil business 
that could not be foreseen a year 
or two ago, and that to-day cannot 
be realized without a personal in- 
vestigation as to the uses to which 
the new fuel is being put and the 
enormous increase in its con- 
sumption which is being effected 
more and more in every city, 
town, village, mining camp, and 
almost in every large ranch on 
the Pacific coast. 

To demonstrate this fact it is 
only necessary to note the history 
of the Pacific Oil Transportation 
company and what it has accom- 
plished in a short perkd. 

The company supplies oil to 
very many consumers of fuel oil 
in San Francisco, Oakland, and 
to almost all the large interior 



tons, fuel capacity, 7,100 barrels, 
and running to distant Tahiti; and 
the Alameda, a sister-ship of the 
Mariposa. 

Not content with a large share 
of the California trade in fuel oil 
the Pacific Oil Transportation com- 
pany has branched out after the 
oil trade in distant parts, and is 
now shipping regularly large 
quantities of fuel oil to the 
Hawaiian islands and to northern 
parts such as Portland, Oregon, 
where coal and wood was sup- 
posed to be so cheap that fuel oil 
competition was deemed impos- 
sible and impracticable. 

As proof that the company has 
succeeded in a short time in build- 
ing up a big business in fuel oil 
it is only necessary to state that 
in San Francisco they have a 
tankage capacity of 55 000 bar- 
rels, in Portland 55,000 barrels, in 
Honolulu 70,000, and at Alcatraz 
60,000 barrels. The last named 
furnishes a chapter in itself. In 
all then the company has a total 
tankage of 240,000 barrels — an ex- 
ceedingly good showing for a con- 
cern yet scarcely a year old. 



tioD company has secured in most 
favorable localities as regards 
transportation facilities, arid of a 
quality second to none in the 
State. 

In the Kern River field the 
company obtains a portion of its 
Kern oil from the dozen' wells of 
the Sterling and Sovereign com- 
panies, and their neighbors. 

These companies will soon have 
a number of new wells finished 
so that their production will soon 
be materially increased. 

In the Coalinga field the com- 
pany obtains large quantities of 
high grade fuel from several pro- 
ducers who have a great deal of 
first-class oil territory so that their 
oil output can be increased as 
rapidly as the railroad can furnish 



rapidly as possible. 

This field is fully described in 
the preceding article. 

Suffice it to say that the Pacific 
Oil Transportation company can 
rely on a regular supply from 
the Western Union wells to-day 
of not less than 2,000 barrels a 
day, and this quantity can easily 
be and is being increased. 

A few weeks ago the Pacific 
Oil Transportation company pur- 
chased the great asphalt refinery 
at Gaviota, called the Alcatraz re- 
finery, together with the pipe-line 
running formerly from the re- 
finery to Sisquoc. This pipe-line 
was removed and re-laid from the 
refinery to the Western Union 
wells, a distance of thirty-nine 
miles. It is a four-inch pipe-line, 




Western^Onion WeinNo. 3, Commenced Flowing September 3, 1901. !W 



«TK* 



and can easily carry ;.ooo barrels 
a day of the light oil from the 
wells to the re6nery at Alcstrai 
This refinery has a capacity of re- 
fining 2.250 barrels of crude oil 
dally. The light volatile paits are 
removed from the oil leaving a 
fifteen degree residuum oil thai 
for fuel purposes cannot be sut 
passed. From the di>tillntr la 
made gasoline, benzine, kerosene, 
etc. 

' The refinery is heated nenr thr 
landiug at Gaviota where a large 
and substantial wharf enable.-- 
vessels of large tonnage and deep 
draft to call at any seaM«n of the 
year to either replenish ih.ir fuel 
supply or load up. if they be 
tank vessels or steamers, with n 
big cargo of fuel oil. 

The track of the Southern Pa- 
cific runsdirectly past the refinery 
so that the company has the ad- 
vantage of both sea and rail trans 
portation. 

This refinery enables the Pa- 
cific Tr importation company to 
furnish its patrons a pure fuel oil 
free from all impurities and from 
moisture, and an oil that main- 
tains a high flash test, insuring 
safety, under all conditions. 

At Alcatraz are tankage facili- 
ties of 60,000 barrels. At the 
wharf at low tide there is a depth 
of twenty-four feet. 

TANK VESSELS AND STEAMERS. 

The Pacific Oil Transportation 
company has vast quantities of 
oil at its command, and it has 
tanks in which to store it. The 
next question is, What facilities 
has the company for transporting 
this great amount of liquid fuel? 

In the first place it has the great 
tank sailing vessel the Marlon 
Chilcott. 

This vessel will soon be making 
her third trip to the Islands where 
the company is under contract to 
furnish 300,000 barrels of crude 
oil to the sugar plantations for 
fuel. The vessel is a bark of 3,000 
tons carrying capacity. .- he is 
fitted up with twelve immense 
tanks having in all a capacity of 




•%i 



17,000 barrels. She is a fast 
sailer, making the round trip to 
the Islands in twenty eight days, 
coming up in the surprisingly fast 
time of twelve days. She re- 
quires but one day to load or un- 
load, her powerful pumps send- 
ing the oil through a half-mile 
pipe-line to the tanks on the Is- 
lands as if it was water. This 
vessel is a practical demon- 
stration what a tank sailing ves- 
sel can do in the way of trans- 
porting California oil to distant 
ports. 

Still more capacious and effec- 
tive as an oil carrier is the steamer 
Rosecrans recently purchased 
from the United States govern- 
ment as a transport and refitted 



Steamer Mariposa. 

as a tank oil carrier. The Rose- 
crans is a modern steamer, in per- 
fect order, and has a tank capacity 
of 24,000 barrels. She will easily 
make the round trip in twenty 
days and with the Marion Chil- 
cott will enable the company to 
meet easily all the present de- 
mands for crude oil both in the 
Islands and along the coast. 

In starting a new venture in 
the oil business on such large 
lines, and in carrying its plans to 
such successful fulfillment, stimu- 
lating as they do the oil business 
and adding greatly to the benefit 
of producers by increasing the 
consumption of oil, the officers 
and directors of the Pacific Oil 
Transportation company deserve 




great credit, and justly receive 
the thanks and cooperation of 
both producers and consumers. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gatio •, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and BoNDSunderwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



Steamer Enterprise. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE CITV 

AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

j In the matter of the Estate of Mary T. P. Flynn, 

deceased. 

Upon the reading and filing of the verified pe- 
tition of Hugh Flyno Adminis.ratoi ol the Estate 
ot Mary T. P FJynn, deceased: it i* hertby or- 
dered that all persons intere>ltd in the estate of 
Mary T. P. Flynn. deceased, be and ih-y aie 
hereby requirtd 10 be and appear in the Su- 
perior Court of the City and County ot San Fran- 
cisco. State of California in the Courtroom of 
said Court department 9 thereof in the City Hall 
ol said «.ity and County on the 19th day of Janu- 
ary 1903 at 10 o'clock a m. of that day to show 
cause, ifany they hav~ why ihe realty belonging 
to said estate and hereinafter deseiibtd should 
not be mortgaged for the sinu of twenly-seveu 
huudied dollars, or such lesser amount as to the 
Comt shall seem meet; reference to said petition 
IS her, by made for further particulars. 

'1 he really referred to is dc-cnbi d as follows: 
Commencing at a point on the Southeasteily line 
of Minna street, distant theieon 308 feet 9 inches 
southwesterly from the southwesterly line ol 
F, urth street, thence southwesterly along said 
line ol Minna street 23 ieet 9 inches, thence at 
right angles southetsterly So ieet thence at 
right angles Northeasterly 23 feet 9 inches 
thence at right angles northwesterly 80 feet to 
the point of commencement, and being a portion 
of 100 Vara lot ivo. 133, in said City aud County 
of San Francisco. 

It 13 further ordered tfcat notice of this order 
be given by the publication thereof for four suc- 
cessive weeks, at least once a week before the 
time appointed for said hearing in the Pacific 
Oil Reporter, a newspaper published in said 
City and County. J. V. COFFEY, Judge. 

Dated December 17th. 1902. 



40 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Portion of the Coalinga Field, Fresno County, California, Showing the Celebrated Blue Goose Well in the Foreground. 



THE COALINGA FIELD. 



The Future of This District Looks Very 
Promising. 



Both the Standard and the Union Will Soon Have Pipe 

Lines and Increased Tankage in This Field — 

Beginning of New Development Work. 



The future of the great Coal- 
inga oil field never looked as 
promising as it does today. 

Although a great deal of oil is 
taken every month from the Coal- 
inga field, the output is practi. ally 
limited on account of the lack of 
transportation facilities afforded by 
the Southern Pacific railroad. Up 
to the present time every barrel of 
oil that has been taken from this 
field has gone over the rails of the 
Southern Pacific company, and it 
has been found impossible to ob- 



tain from the company tank cars 
sufficient to meet the constantly 
increasing demand for the Coal- 
inga oil. 

The oil from this field is valu- 
able in a three fold way. First : 
It is greatly in demand for gas 
making purposes. Much of the 
oil obtained in this field has pecu- 
liar characteristics which make it 
superior to all other oils used in 
making gas. Secondly : It is in 
demand for refining purposes, it 
having been practically demon- 



strated that the oil* from this field, 
if properly handled, is well adapt- 
ed for making benzine, gasoline 
and the several grades of kerosene. 
Thirdly : The heavy oil produced 
in the field is one of the best fuel 
oils offered on the market. 

In 1901 the field produced 74,- 
000 barrels. Although there were 
in the field seventy-four pro uc- 
ing wells, oil was taken from forty- 
one, and of these forty-one wells 
scarcely a dozen were kept con- 
stantly on the pump, the others 
being puinped only as their oil 
could be utilized. The average 
daily yield last year was only 
about 230 barrels a day, which is 
only a fractional part of what the 
field is able to produce. The field 
at the present time is fully able to 
produce 1,500,000 barrels of oil a 
year, and this total yield could 
easily be doubled with six months 
or even less. 

There are at present in the 
Coalinga field proper twenty-three 
oil companies which have pro- 
ducing wells. These are as fol- 
lows: 



Name of Company. 



Chanslor& Canfield... 

Coalinga 

Home 

Cala. Oil Fields, Ltd... 
Cala. Oil Fields, Ltd. . . 

Sauer Dough 

Caribou 

Fauna 

Hanforfl 

Independence 

Twenty-Eight 

Oil City Petroleum 

Producers Guaranteed. 

j?fitna 

Confidence 

Maine State 

Commercial 

El Capitan 

Phila. & S. F 

Fresno & S. F 

Mercantile Crude 

York Coalinga 

S. F. Crude 

Esperanza 

St. Paul-Fresno 



(24) Total. 



17, 19- 

20, 19- 

20, 19- 

21, 19- 

27, 19- 

22, 19- 

22, 19- 

28, 19- 
28, rg- 
28, 19- 
28, 19- 
28, 19- 
3*. 1 9- 
3°. 19- 
3', '9 
3', 19- 
31, 19 
31, 19- 
36. 19 

I, 20- 
6, 20- 

6, 20- 

6, 20- 
6, 20' 

23. 20 



82 



The Union Oil company, which 
already has considerab e tankage 
in the field and a small pipe-line 
to the railway, is seriously contem- 
plating the building of a pipe-line 
over the Coast Range, traversing 
the Fresno-San Benito oil districts 
and finding its outlet at the harbor 




Portion of the Coalinga Oil District, Fresno County, California, Showing the Camp of the California Oil Fields, Limited. 



PACI 



T!j»i. i* t 




0\\_WA\s 



r> "TwOOu-.^ WtW s 



of Moss Landing in Monterey 
county. It is an established fact 
that the Union Oil company has 
taken the preparatory steps which 
probably will result in the con- 
struction of this line during iq°3- 
The rapidly increasing business of 
this company and the fact that it 
requires at least twice the amount 
of oil that it did a year ago, and 
that its requirements are increas- 



Map of tli- 

ing more rapidly from month to 
to month makes it evident that the 
Union Oil company must, as soon 
as possible, obtain a pipeline to 
the coast which will enable it to 
fill its tank steamers and sailing 
vessels with fuel oil such as can be 
obtained in the Coalinga field. 

The great pipeline of the Stan- 
dard Oil company from Bakersfield 
to Point Richmond is now laid in 



iuga Oil District. 

the San Joaquin valley, distant 
only eighteen miles from the 
Coalinga field. The Standard has 
already commenced the erectio' 
of an immense oil-storage plant 
on the land of the California Oil 
Fields, Limited, and when this 
plant is completed, if not before, 
a pipe-line will undoubtedly be 
laid connecting this plant with 
the main pipe-line frci Bakers- 



field to the bay. 

There are now in the Coalinga 
field proper eighty-two producing 
wells. It is safe to say that by 
the close of the summer months 
this number will have increased 
to over one hundred, and, that 
while the present yield is less 
than 250 barrels a day, that in 
six months the output of the field 
will exceed 1,500 barrels a day. 



42 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



WELLS OF VENTURA COUNTY. 



Many of These are the Oldest and Best 
Wells in the State. 



Over 250 Producing Wells Yielding a High Gravity 
Oil— This District Presents Great Opportuni- 
ties for Further Development. 



By J. B. McCloskey. 



When the history of the oil fields of 
Ventura county is written, it will be a 
revelation to many to know that there 
is such a great extent of well defined 
oil land within its boundary. 

The main oil belt extends practically 
across the county from east to west, 
and on it most of the wells have been 
drilled. Also, both north and south 
of this belt is some very extensive ter- 
ritory, also very well defined, both by 
surface indications and developments. 

Beginning on the west end of the 
main belt on the north slope, and ex- 
tending east to the Santa Paula Can- 
yon, are situated the wells of the Olga 
Ventura Company, Union Oil Com- 
pany, Sobra Vista Company, Whidden 
Doble Company, Bard Oil and Asphalt 
Company, Westlake Oil Company, 
and the Capitol Crude Oil Company. 

On the south slope are the wells of 
the Elesw Oil Company, Burrow's and 
Sons, Union Oil Company, Farrell and 
Soule, Green Oil Company, and Slo- 
cum Oil Company. 

East from the Santa Paula Canyon, 
are the O'Hara wells, and those of the 
Pure Oil Company, and Empire Oil 
Company. 

Then comes the Big Sespe District. 

Up the Sespe Canyon are located the 
wells of the Big Sespe Oil Company, 
Union Consolidated Oil Company and 
Sespe Canyon Oil Company. East 
from the Sespe Canyon are the Union 
Oil Company's wells, known as the 
Kentuck wells, California wells, Four 
Forks wells, and Tar Creek wells. 
Extending north and northwest from 
the Tar Creek wells is a great extent 
of undeveloped oil territory with well 
defined, and very regular oil strata, 
and which will some day be dotted over 
with oil derricks, and which will pro- 
duce an immense quantity of oil of a 
high grade, with long life to the wells, 
as this has been the history of develop- 
ments so far in the Big Sespe District. 
In fact, long life is characteristic of 
most of the wells of Ventura county. 



With its great variety of formations, 
and stratifications', the Big Sespe Dis- 
trict is extremely interesting from a 
geological stand-point. East of the 
Tar Creek wells is a divide that separ- 



longing to the Union Oil Company. 

All of these properties are produc- 
ers, and one would judge from the 
number of them, that Ventura county 
must be drilled full of holes, but such 
is not the case. In fact, the oil fields 
of Ventura county are but little more 
than prospected, considering the extent 
of the known field, not to speak of her 
possible untested territory. 

There are at least 250 finished wells 
in the county, and they will average in 
depth, about 1,000 feet. 

The average cost of drilling is a hard 
matter to arrive at, as conditions differ 
so much in the different districts, as 
well as the difference in management of 
the different companies. Poor man- 
agement and inexperienced labor in 
the drilling field, is sure to make an ex- 
pensive well; while under able manage- 
ment, and with skilled drillers, wells 
have been drilled 1,000 feet in this field, 
for less than one dollar per foot, 
while many have cost five dollars per 
foot and upward; but I believe it 
reasonable to say that three dollars per 




O'Hara Wells near Santa Paula, Ventura County. 



ates the Tar Creek wells from the Mo- 
delo wells situated on Piru Canyon 
watershed, and west of the mouth of 
the Piru Canyon are the wells of the 
Piru Land Company, and west of these 
wells in the Hopper Canyon are the 
Buckhorn Oil Company wells, and the 
wells of the Fortuna Oil Company. 
Across the river and a few miles east 
of the town of Piru, in the Tapa Can- 
yon are the Tapa wells. West from 
the Tapa wells are the wells of the 
Eureka Oil Company, and the Union 
Oil Company wells in Torrey Canyon. 
The Torrey Canyon wells have been, 
and are yet great producers of oil; in 
fact, they are among the "banner" 
wells of Ventura county. 

West from the Torrey Canyon wells 
are the wells of the Union Oil Com- 
pany, known as the Bardsdale wells, 
and the wells of the Patterson Oil 
Company, and Bardsdale Crua"e Oil 
Company. 

South of Santa Paula about twenty 
miles are the Calleguas wells, also be- 



foot will cover the average cost of 
drilling. 

There are about 15 strings of tools 
running in the county at present which 
number will probably be more than 
doubled before summer time. Among 
those who are drilling new wells are 
Farrell & Soule in the Saltmarsh Can- 
yon, Burrows & Sons in the Wheeler 
Canyon, the New Weldon Oil Com- 
pany on the Hartman place, Uncle John 
Oil Company north of Saticoy, Sulpher 
Mountain Oil Company on Sulphur 
Mountain, S. O. Wood on the Pres- 
cilla tract, and also on the Fitch tract, 
Bardsdale Oil Company, Mr. Gilmore 
on the Balcom tract, Sespe Canyon 
Company, Tapo Company, Modello 
Company,, Buckhorn Company, Olga 
Ventura Company, and the Union Oil 
Company. 

Situated as the oil fields of this 
county are, at an elevation of from 800 
feet to upward of 3,000 feet above sea 
level, all the production of the differ- 
ent fields gravitates through pipe line, 




Bard and Capital Crude Wells, near Santa Paula, Ventura County. 



to the ocean at Ventura, where there is 
extensive tankage, or to a shipping 
point by rail. 

The pipe line sytem of the Union Oil 
Company, is the most extensive and 
complete of any company in California, 
reaching almost the entire oil field, 
and as it is a gravity system, it is com- 
paratively inexpensive to operate. 
There are 22 miles of 4-inch line, and. 
16 miles of 3-inch, both together form- 
ing the main line to the ocean, and 
there are over 100 miles of 2-inch lines 
leading into it. 

Besides the Union Oil Company's 
pipe-line, the Capitol Crude Oil Com- 
pany has a line from their wells, 7 miles 
north of Santa Paula to their own re- 
ceiving and storage tanks at the rail- 
road, and the Empire Oil Company 
has 6 miles of pipe-line, the terminus 
of both lines being at Santa Paula, 
where they have their own loading 
rack to fill the tank cars. 

There is also a pipe-line from the 
wells in Hopper Canyon to tankage at 
Buckhorn station, and the Modelo Oil 
Company also owns its own pipe-line 
from their wells to Piru station. 

Altogether there are about 175 miles 
of pipe-line- in the county, and about 
150 miles of a telephone system, used 
exclusively by the different oil compan- 
ies. 

There are about 130,000 barrels of 
storage and stock tanks, besides more 
or less smaller tankage at the different 
wells. 

Santa Paula is the principle distrib- 
uting point for the oil fields, and there 
are the shops of the California Tool Co. 
and the Santa Paula Oil Tool Co., 
where everything needed in the oil bus- 
iness is kept in stock, and where all 
repair work can be done at very short 
notice. This is a very important fea- 
ture in the developing of an oil field, 
to be close to a base of supplies, and 
well-equipped shops where first-class 
work is turned out. 

There seems to be a wide-spread 
misapprehension among oil investors, 
in regard to Ventura County. Many 
of them are under the impression that 
what lands are not owned by the Un- 
ion Oil Company are not worth inves- 
tigating, but this is not the case. It 
is true the Union Oil Company owns 
thousands of acres of good oil land, 
but they do not own all of it. There 
is still a vast acreage outside of the 
Union Oil Company's holdings, and 
besides, what the Union owns they 
are justly entitled to, for were it not 
for their early pioneer work in the oil 
business, Ventura County in particular, 
and the State of California in general, 
would not be near as well developed 
along oil lines, as it is today. 

Then there is the long life of the 
wells in this county to be taken into 
consideration. The old Scott wells in 
the Santa Paula canyon, now operated 
by the Slocum Oil Company, were 
drilled in the early 70's and have been 
pumped continuously and are still pro- 
ducing. The same is true of some of 
the wells drilled by the Union Oil Com- 
pany in the Adams canyon in 1888, 
while the Kentuck wells, California 
wells and Tar-creek wells are all old' 
producers. No. 1 well in Tar-creek 
was drilled over 15 years ago, and is 
still among the producers of that re- 
markable district. No. 1 well on the 
O'Hara property is still producing, al 
though it is only 60 feet deep, and was 
-irilled in 1887, and there are many 
others in the county. 

These are only a few of the advan- 
tages of the Ventura County oil fields. 
The ups and downs of the oil business 
have been many, but every indication 
ooints to a steady raise in prices, and 
vith the rapidly increasing demand for 
oil, there is no reasonable doubt but 
that the raise will be permanent. 

The oil producers are in some re- 
spects like the farmers. They won't 
stick together. If they did, there would 
■lot be any oil selling at 15 cents per 
barrel, with its only competitor, coal, 
selling at from five to seven dollars 
per ton. As long as the producers 
von't combine their interests and keep 
the market steady, it is a good thing 
'or them, and the oil business in gen- 
-ral.that some one with both unlimited 
capital and experience in the business, 
'ike the Union Oil Company, and the 
Standard Oil Company, does come in 
md straighten out the tangle; and the 
-iil business in California will be all 
the better for the advent of the Stan- 
dard Oil Company. 

J. B. McCloskey. 

Santa Paula, Cal., December 20, 1902. 



PACIFIC Oil. RKPORTKR 



WHITTIER OIL DISTRICT. 

An OH Region That Produces a Good Grade 
of Refining Oil. 



A Rich OH District Supplied With Pipe-Lines and 

Abundant Tankage, and Which Presents Great 

Opportunities for Further Development. 



By \V. A. Smith 

The development ol the Whittier oil The wells of the Whittier Crude, five 
fields has been similar to that of most 



other California fields of recent date. 

In 1888, the Pickering Land, and 
Water Company which owned, at that 
time, 3 vast tract of land, and which 
colonized Whittier, made several at- 
tempts to get oil. They believed it 
Was there from brca beds and seep- 
ages which were to be found all 
through the hills, and even made three 
attempts to get the fluid. The wells 
were all drilled with crude tools, and 
consequently were all crooked. The 
deepest well was about 800 feet. Some 
oil was found, but not in paying quan- 
tities. The contractor, in a fit of in- 
ebriety, shot them and all chance to go 
deeper was lost. 

There was at an early day also 
some development in Chandler can- 
yon, but the wells were all shallow, and 
not very productive. 

In ;S95, Messrs. Neuer, Lacy and 
Stone prospected the hills, and secured 
from the Pickering Land and Water 
Co., a lease of 2,700 acres of hill land, 
and founded the Central Oil Co., which 
at once began development work. They 
got their first well in '96, and have kept 
steadily at work ever since, having at 
this time over 30 producing wells 
averaging about 1,000 feet in depth and 
with a production of 18,000 barrels per 
month. 

This was the pioneer company, after 
it came the Home, a local organiza- 
tion, which commenced work in 1897, 
and now has 15 producing wells, aver- 
aging about 1,400 feet in depth, with 
a production of about 10,000 barrels 
per month. 

The Whittier Crude, Turner, Fi- 
delity and Warner companies 
came along in about the order named. 



number, are about 1,400 feel deep 
■ .11 an average, with about 3,000 barrels 



ccp with a production ol 8,000 
barrels per month. 

The Murphy I 
which have been drilled to an av< 
I they ba\ 
largest production in the field 
.l-'.ooo barrels per month. Tht 
their w»lls flow and the oil is oi light 
product. 

The New England and Raymond 
have oil, bul particulars arc 
ittainable at tin- writing. 

All the Whittier wells are in the 
range ol the Puente hills and on the 
well defined line extending from Sum 
mcrland on the north down through 
Newhall and Los Angeles, A few miles 
to the cast is the property of the 
Puente Oil Co., which has been pro- 
ducing for 15 years, and lias over 60 
producing wells at present. 



4i 



1 this 

•h lh( Murphy 

.vcrc 
1 month. The \\ : 
and Home companies ha> > 
lines :i,- n.icks at 

Whittier. 

The tankage in this field will r 
150,000 barrels. The Murphy company 
- el, 40.1XX) barrel 
tank, on their propi 

The situation is much brighter than 
a few months ago. There is a better 
demand at an advanced pme. and de- 
velopments arc commencing attain, 
I strings having been pul 

Whittier oil runs from 18 to 23 grav- 




per month production, 
four productive wells 
t.ooo feet, with about 



The Turner's 
average about 
3,000 



barrels 



Murphy and Central Wells at Whittier. 

and on end, and drilling is very expen- 
The Whittier field is a hard proposi- 
tion, the formation is badly broken, 




Fidelity, Home, Turner and Whittier Crude Wells, at Whittier, Cal. 



ity, and much of it is sold to refineries. 

It is interesting to note the success 
of the Murphy company, and the deptli 
attained. These are largely due to 
Wm. Plotts, the manager of the com- 
pany. Mr. Plotts is an experienced 
oil man, and difficulties seem to hamper 
him very little. He has patented many 
devices for overcoming the peculiar 
conditions found here, and to these 
inventions and his gray matter is due 
his company's production. His latest 
invention is a method of packing wells 
to make them flow more freely. 

While the Whittier field is not the 
most productive field in the State, its 
possibilities are exceedingly great, and 
the field could easily produce 
many times the present amount of pro- 
duction if it was sufficiently developed. 

The-quality of the oil is far above the 
average of California crude, and trie 
price obtained makes a fifty barrel well 
exceedingly valuable. 

W. A. SMITH. 

Whittier, Cal., Dec. 16, 1902. 



The National Tube company recently 
announced a reduction of 10 percent in 
the price of merchant pipe. It would 
have been very gratifying to the oil men 
if the big corporation had made the re- 
duction general, and apply also to line 
pipe, tubing and casing. All through 
the depression the price of pipe, such as 
is used in the oil fields, remained at a 
fixed point. 



It is reported that the Italiau Govern- 
ment intend to make a large purchase of 
Texas oil. A group of French finan- 
ciers, having business relations with 
Italy, have commissioned Mr. Laing 
Malcolmson of London to negotiate with 
Texas producers on this subject. 



44 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE MIDWAY OIL FIELD. 



The Coming Great Oil District of Cal= 

ifornia. 



Its Future Possibilities in the Way of Production Just 

Beginning to Be Appreciated— Much Develop 

ment Work Is Promised. 



By Hon. C. A. Barlow. 



The fact is beginning to be 
recognized that the west side of 
Kern county is the greatest and 
most prominent oil field in the 
world. The oil land is laid down 
in regular formation, outcroppings 
along the edge of the foothills 
demonstrating perfectly the trend 
of the strike. The sand has the 
coarse, pebbly character that is 
recognized by oil experts as the 
ideal reservoir from which to draw 
a long continued supply of good 
quality oil, and more nearly re- 
sembles the famous oil sand of 
Pennsylvania than is found in any 
other field. This coarse sand 
forms a natural filter, keeping 
back any finer particles that may 
be in it, and relieving the pumps 
of the continual sanding that pre- 
vails in many localities. 

The general strike is nearly 
northwest and southeast, with a 
dip of about 30° to the northeast. 

Beginning at Sunset, the de- 
velopment has shown that the oil 
belt has a width of from one and 
one-half to two miles, and extends 
northwest through Midway and 
McKittrick to Templor. Also, 
though still undeveloped, the out- 
croppings and general formation 
show that in all probability the 
same belt continues on through 
the Canary Springs and Devil's 
Den districts to Coalinga, making 
what time will demonstrate to bt 
a continuous oil belt nearly one 
hundred ..niles long. 

The heart of this great field so 
far as developed is the Midway. 
Here is found all the signs and 
characteristics of an ideal oil 
formation. All are laid down in 
perfect order. The boundaries can 
be traced by the experienced eye 
with perfect regularity, and the 
finding of oil is no longer a matter 
of speculation, but simply a busi- 
ness proposition. Shrewd inves- 
tors have seen these conditions, 
and have been quietly picking up 
good territory for some time. The 
question of transportation has 
hitherto been the unsolved prob- 
lem. Recent surveys by three 
different railroad companies, sev- 
eral projected pipe-lines, and the 
assured fact of the immediate 
building of the Midland Pacific 
railroad from Midway through 
Sunset to Port Harford, affording 
cheap transportation from the 
heart of the oil fields to one of the 
best harbors on the coast, aresigns 
of the nearby solution of the vex- 
ed problem, and the operators in 
this field are beginning to believe 
that the merited reward of their 
keen foresight and patient en- 
deavors will soon be at hand. 

Mr. C. F. Lufkin, field expert of 
the Standard Oil company, recent- 



ly visited the oil fields of Kern 
county in the interests of his com- 
pany. The views of such a 
specialist on the value of oil terri- 
tories, who has visited all the oil 
fields in the world, given in a re- 
cent interview in the Bakersfield 
Echo may be interesting in this 
connection. 

"Speaking of the outlook here 
Mr. Lufkin said that the three 
fields, McKittrick, Midway and 
Sunset, showed as much promise 



Maricopa, Monarch, Occidental, United 
Crude, Pacific, Tremont, J.B. & B., Fed- 
eral Crude (formerly Colorado-Califor- 
nia), Beaver, Stratton, Lucky Boy and 
California Fortune. At the latter wells 
there is over 50,000 barrels of oil in one 
of the largest reservoirs in the county. 
There are more than two dozen flowing 
wells in this field, and today the wells 
in the south Midway and Sunset field 
number over 140. With pipe-lines or rail- 
road facilities in this field will come an 
era of development such as California 
has never seen since the palmy days of 
1900 in the Kern River field. 

THE STANDARD ROCK OIL 



This Asphalt Company Is Now 
Actively Filling Contracts. 

Major R. A. Falkenberg, President and 
Manager of the Standard Rock Oil and 
Asphaltum and Refining company, ex- 
pects his company very shortly to be in 
a position where it will be able to fill the 
orders for its product which have been 
coming in very freely lately. These 
orders could not be filled for the simple 
reason the company was not in a position 
to incur the large and necessary ex- 
penses which must be incurred before 
the company could secure a sufficient 
amount of proper raw material and the 
proper appliances for handling it. 

Last year the company acted upon the 



•T'S'S'a'g^'g'y'T'g'j'y'.'.'B'S'S'B'S'S'^ 1 » 



ft 



7* 

m 

9\ 



m 
m 

m 

m 
m 
m 

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% 



California Oil Refineries. 

There are thirty-two oil refineries in the State, 
varying in size and capacity from the twenty-barrel 
plant of the Knapp Refining company at Half Moon 
Bay to the mammoth refinery of the Pacific Coast Oil 
company at Point Richmond. 

The Pacific Coast Oil company, the Union Oil com- 
pany of California, and the Puente Oil company man- 
ufacture refined oils for illuminants, naphthas, and 
other products, while most of the other refineries are 
mainly confined to the manufacture of asphalt, distil- 
lates, and lubricating oils. 

Their locations are as follows : 
Bay and tributary region around San Francisco. ... 7 

In the San Joaquin Valley ' 8 

Region along the coast 4 

City of Los Angeles 12 

At Chino 1 



it/ 

it/ 



it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
it) 
it/ 
it/ 
it/ 
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» 



Total .... 32 ijf\ 

The total still capacity of all the refineries is ap- "* 
proximately 31,575 barrels. 'ti 

^^^ ^^» ^^^ ^^to* ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^»- ^^fr 4^^ ^^fr ^^^ ^^v ^^^ ^^» ^^» ^^^ ^^b* ^^» ^^^ ^^^ ^Fi _ r 



as any fields he had ever visited. 
He found the tracings more broken here 
than in either of the other two fields, 
but he gave twenty years as the shortest 
duration ol the life of the field " 

The recent strike by the Altoona Mid- 
way company of a 400-barrel well of 21 
gravity oil has proven the theory long 
held by the most observant that the Mid- 
way oil would prove to be the best in the 
county. This well is on section 25, 32- 

23, and adjoins the famous "Croesus" 
property on the same section, and the 
"Mascot" property, which is on section 
26, 3223. These two last mentioned 
properties belong to Spellacy & 
Stroud, two of the best known and most 
practical oil men in the state. 

To the northwest from these wells 
many good properties have been de- 
veloped and the wells of Chanslor & 
Canfield and the Midway Oil company 
of Oregon on section 8, 32-23, which are 
about 400 barrels capacity and 20 grav- 
ity oil, simply prove the theory that the 
belt is continuous and that the oil sands 
are similar. Southeast of the group of 
wells referred to in the vicinity of 25, 32- 
23 the strike is proven coutinnous, until 
a couple of miles southeast of Jewett & 
Blodgett development on section 13, 11- 

24, S. B. M. 

It would be superfluous to mention all 
of the wells in this stretch of proven ter- 
ritory, but among the most prominent 
are the Queen, Alameda Limited, Crown, 



advice of its vice-president, who claimed 
to have a -practical knowledge of asphalt 
refining, and expended several thousand 
dollars in putting several tunnels into 
the asphalt hills, and in excavating and 
placing on the dump a great many hun- 
dred tons of bituminous rock for the 
purpose of refining from it the asphalt 
which it contained. Four large and 
modern stills of the finest marine steel 
were purchased and placed in position at 
great expense and labor. 

After all this had been accomplished 
actual and repeated tests demonstrated 
that, although the bituminous rock could 
be refined and a very fine quality of 
asphalt obtained, the process was too 
lengthy and expensive to be profitable. 
There was so much refuse material in 
the bituminous rock of clay, sand, dirt, 
pebbles and other matter of vegetable 
and mineral nature, that the refining 
process required numerous repetitions in 
order to produce a product of high grade, 
and consequently the product when ob- 
tained could not be sola at a profit if sold 
at prevailing prices for high class as- 
phalt. 

Having seen the mistake, and aware of 
the great and unnecessary expense in 
which the company had been involved 
President Falkenberg ceased experi- 
menting further with tne bituminous 
rock proposition; and began a thorough 



search after the underlying deposit of 
liquid asphalt from which had oozed 
the bitumen which had formed the bitu- 
minous rock. 

Six holes were bored in different 
places and at depths ranging from 50 to 
150 feet. In each hole a deposit of pure 
liquid asphaltum was obtained which 
raised up in each hole nearly to the sur- 
face. 

A shaft eight by four will be exca- 
vated to a depth of 150 feet, or perhaps 
300 feet if necessary ; steam pipes will be 
placed in the hole for the purpose of 
heating the liquid asphaltum, thus thin- 
ning it out so that it can be pumped 
without difficulty into the stills. 

Some time since Major Falkenberg 
sent samples of his asphalt to England 
of the B grade, and received in return an 




Maj. R. A. Falkenberg. 

initial order for asphalt of this grade to 
be sent by steamer direct to London. 
This order is now being filled, and if it 
is satisfactory to the London purchaser 
another order aggregating 1,000 tons a 
year will be received. 

The company has been handicapped 
by lack of sufficient funds to continue 
work as it should be continued, and the 
policy of the company has been never to 
go in debt, but to pay as it goes. 

It is said the company has received re- 
cently some new blood" and the needed 
capital, and will now 'go ahead rapidly 
and on broader lines. 

Thecompany has excellent property, 
good prospects and deserves, and will 
certainly have, great success. 

The company is now establishing east- 
ern agencies for the sale of stock and also 
for the Fale of its asphalt. Mr. W. J. 
Curtis of Portland, Or., has been ap- 
pointed ass'stant secretary. He is highly 
efficient, and has charge of the northern 
and northeastern agencies. 

It is a matter of regret that Major 
Falkenberg, the efficient manager of the 
company, has lately been a great sufferer 
from rheumatism and neuralgia, brought 
on largely from overwork and exposure 
at the company's plant at Sargent's. It 
is to be hoped that his severe indisposi- 
tion will not prevent his giving his con- 
tinued personal at'ention to the affairs of 
the company, but at any rate the affairs 
of the company will go on uninterrupt- 
edly, and will follow the lines laid down 
by the management. 



Good-bye to the Loomis. 

After all these years of faithful- 
ness Ventura Is to lose the oil 
steamer, George Loomis. That 
craft made her last trip this week, 
and in future will carry refined 
oil from San Francisco to the va- 
rious coast ports. 

It is expected that the new oil 
boat to run between this port and 
Honolulu with crude oil will soon 
be in port. She took on her in- 
itial trip from San Francisco to 
the islands a cargo of oil, and in 
future will make the trip direct 
from Ventura to Honolulu. She 
is due any day now. 

The Loomis and her strenuous 
whistle will be missed, as will her 
weekly visits. It is stated that 
the Loomis has carried enough oil 
since she's been in the business to 
float all the fleets in the world. — 
Ventura Free Press. 



New Oil Company. 

The Eastern Consolidated Oil 
company has filed articles of in- 
corporation. Principal place of 
business, Portland, Me. Direc- 
tors: D. N. Morgan, E. Cady and 
O. L- Ackerley. Capital stock, 
$5,000,000. 



PACIFIC OIL REP( 



OIL USED IN GAS-MAKING. 






si and steam con: 



A Process Perfected that Lessens Materi- 
ally the Cost of Manufacture. 



As a Result Many Small Towns in California Hither- 
to Unable to Afford Gas Plants are Now 
Generally installing Them. 



By B. S. I'edcrscn 



ny on 
■ i.il to 
the manufacture o( illumi- 
nating ami (ucl gas. In tins age o( 
keen electrical competition and small 

profits u i> a serious 
uith failun ■ those who 

Until within the last ten years very 
little gas was made by any but the 
time-tried method of distilling litnmin- 
eoal in retorts, a method which 
furnished a gas of good quality, and 
several by-products all of which 
brought a fair price to the gas com- 
pany. 

Electricity becoming a factor in the 
lighting business, the ipanies 

were compelled, for their own protec- 
tion, to adopt cheaper and more mod- 
ern methods of gas manufacture, 
in the larger cities 
installed water-gas apparatus, the 
capacity of the apparatus per 
square foot of floor area and decreased 
labor per thousand feet manufactured 
appealing to them as well as the 
adaptability of the apparatus to the 
daily output of gas. Thus, with an 
apparatus rated one million feet daily 
capacity nearly as great a degree of 
omy could be obtained wdiile it was 
at half its daily capacity as at full load, 
whereas coal gas benches are required 
run at full capacity that they may 
be economically operated. 

By running the two in conjunction. 
the gas companies were enabled to 



:or fluctuations of the output, 
making their minimum output on the 

coal g.t* benches and then making the 
quired in addition on the water 
pparatus: 

The smaller companies were not 
-low in following the lead of the larger 
ones as they were benefited p 

greater extent. They 
could fill their holders with gas and 
then shut down the plant until the 
- were to In- refilled, using the 
operator meanwhile for other work 
There was no wasted lime, and the ap- 
paratus required no attention ami 
caused no expense while it was idle, 
while with coal-gas benches constant 
attention was necessary, and continual 
expense was incurred whether gas 
was being made or not. 

In water gas manufacture anthra- 
cite coal is generally used for fuel, 
though a good quality of coke does 
just as well. 

A standard water-gas apparatus 
consists of either two or three cylin- 
drical shells, lined with fire-brick, and 
designate generator and superheater 
where two shells are used and gene- 
rator, carburetter and superheater 
where the three shell setting is used, 
the latter being invariably used 
wherever a daily capacity of over 50,- 
000 cubic feet is required. 

The generator besides being lined 
with fire brick is fitted with grate bars 
and cleaning doors after the manner of 
vertical boilers and is also supplied 



are ' 

Both v 
with 

Tin m the two 

the super' 

in reaching from the 
part ol thi 

it of the superheater under the 
arch. 
Th. : and scrubbei 

innion to either style of letting. 
In the manufacture ol wal 
antlr, .1 for 

fuel, though quality an- 

swers the purpo ry respect. 

The ci I in the generator ami 

a blast applied until the fai 
to a high degree. incand< 31 
the point desired. Tl ruing 

from the blast pass to tin- superheat- 
er, where .111 additional blast is admit- 
ted, and the gas ignited when it >-. 
the purpose of heating up that shell 
and the bricks placed upon tin arch. 

When tli'- proper heat ha 

king, the blasl is shut 
off and tli<- stack valve closed. Steam 
is admitted under the grates in the 
generator which, passing up through 
the body of fuel is decomposed into its 
constituent gases — hydrogen and oxy- 
gen. The oxygen combines with the 
carbon of the fuel, forming carbonic 
oxide and some carbonic aeifl gas. 
the hydrogen passing with the above 
gases as free hydrogen. 

This combination of gases passes in- 
to the superheater, where a jet of oil is 
injected above the lower arch and va- 
porized. This oil is used to enrich the 
water-gas which in itself has little il- 
luminating power. The water-gas and 
oil vapor combines in the superheater. 
and is there thoroughly fixed in the 
oassaee Up the shell and around the 
heated checker brick, becoming the 
commercial water-gas in its raw state. 
This is further washed, scrubbed, con- 
densed, and purified before being sent 
to the consumer. 

This method of gas manufacture 
while very satisfactory in comparison 
with coal ens. because of the'scarcity of 
coal, and the prices asked for it. as 



well as 



tried to 

lighter oil 
Having ci 

install . 

With 

at hand, the 

of all other 
liquid, and use it in tl 
ready installed hv the 

The 
being the fil 
dard wa 

Tli.' char 

able 10 tin- mamil 
.'..in.. I tn be 

of facilitating combu i ion in 
11 ..1 the Ii.mv \ oil, and 
rapid and direct connections Ihro 
the apparatus. 

The 1 — e 

the generator ami 

removed an. I a straighl 1 omvection 

made between the two shells near the 

bottom. 

The grates wen ■ :. and 

a fire-brick arch sprung in its place 
with loose fire brick placed on il a- in 
the superheater. A blast connection 
was made near the top of thi 
or ^nd an nil burner and steam jel 
placed at the extreme top 'lite supei 
heater was left as in the watei 
tine, a rearrangement of thi 
brick being all that was reqi 

One reason for making the 1 
was to make use of all heatina paci 
possible in the machine which can 
readilv Ire seen could belter be obta 
by injecting oil in the ton of the gen- 
erator. allowing it to pass down l.hr It 

the machine, being thoroughly eras 




Interior of Oil Gas Works at Oroville. 



46 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Wells of the Monarch Oil Company, in 2, 11-24, Sunset District. 



sified in the passage by coming in con- 
tact with the heated bricks, and then 
passing into and up through the super- 
heater where it would be fixed or made 
permanent as a gas.. 

Had we tried to use the water-gas 
apparatus without changing it, the oil 
would have been injected into the low- 
er part of the generator where it would 
have collected and made a pool of oil 
and pitch, as it would not have been 
possible to force the oil up through the 
machine. 

It was the intention to make a 
water-gas as with hard fuel, using the 
particles of carbon in the form of lamp 
black which had deposited upon the 
bricks in heating up the machine to 
form carbonic oxide as is the water- 
gas machine. The spraying of oil up- 
on the highly heated bricks was also 
counted on to aid in the water-gas 
manufacture. 

While this theory looked very plausi- 
ble on paper, we were doomed to dis- 
appointment in the practice. 

The first run demonstrated that very 
little if any water-gas was made, the 
action being more in the nature of a 
conversion of oil into marsh gas at the 
'first part of the run, and then as the 
bricks cooled off, a gradual increase in 
the illuminating gas or rather oil vapor 
which mixed with the first' part of the 
run made an average gas of good can- 
dle power. 

Having ample superheating surface, 
no trouble was encountered with con- 
densation. ■ 

An analysis of the gas proved our 
revised conclusion correct as to the gas 
made. The gas was found to contain 
by volume about 30 per cent, of marsh 
gas, 50 per cent, of hydrogen, 9 per 
cent, illuminants. and only 5 per cent, 
of carbonic oxide, the balance being 
nitrogen, carbonic acid and oxvgen be- 
ing a gas that was well supplied with 
all the (requirements of a first-class 
commercial, and favorably comparable 
to any gas made under any method. 

Some trouble was anticipated in the 
handling of the heavy 14 degree oil, 
and precautions were taken to elimin- 
ate all known difficulties. We were 



pleasantly surprised to note that no 
trouble of any kind was traceable to 
this end of the works, and we are firm 
believers that the oil has not yet been 
discovered that we cannot handle. 

While we thought all care had also 
been taken to eliminate the source of 
all failures of oil gas machinery which 
was the lamp black trouble, it was as- 
certained after one day's run that we 
had not altogether done so. The de- 
fection was however immediately 
remedied by some small changes in the 
seal and scrubber and that bugaboo was 
laid at rest for all time. 

Because of the great volume of hy- 
drogen gas in the finished product, it 
was found necessary to carry a little 
higher candle power than would be re- 
quired with coal or water-gas, but with 
this small addition of oil the gas was 
not distinguishable from either coal or 
water-gas. The flame was fairly large 
in an open tip and intensely white, 
combining it seemed the good qualities 
of both coal and water-gas. 

While the above is written largely 
for the benefit of those companies al- 
ready having water-gas apparatus, 
showing what may be done to relieve 
the strain on their purse as well as 
mind; it may also show those contem- 
plating gas works installations in 
smaller cities that it can be done, and 
as far as the question of making oil gas 
is concerned, it is only a matter of 
choosing the best apparatus under the 
conditions prevailing. 

The number and shape of the ap- 
paratus bears very little upon the ques- 
tion of choice; but one thing must be 
well looked into, and that is the appar- 
atus for the adjustment and equaliz- 
ing of heats in the machine. 

It is most important that every shell 
be provided with blast arrangement, 
as the adjustment cannot be made at 
one point for the entire apparatus, and 
any attempt to do so will invariably 
result in excess of lamp black, or pos- 
sibly the stopping up of pipes with 
pitch. 

Again, the construction of seal and 
scrubbers must be so that there is no 
possibility of lamp black or any other 



substance but gas passing the last 
named apparatus. Failure to heed this 
warning will result in more stoppages 
than any set of men can take care of. 

In laying out a new works, ample 
holder room should be provided, as it 
is in the large make that the real 
economy is apparent. Preferably twe 
holders should be used — a small re- 
lief or primary holder into which the 
gas passes directly from the apparatus 
and a secondary or storage holder 
from which the town is supplied, the 
gas passing from the first through the 
purifiers into the second. 

•Having the relief holder of 10,000 
cubic feet capacity and the storage 
holder op 20,000 cubic feet capacity 
would give ample storage for a good 
run, and on a run of 30,000 cubic feet, 
full economy can be reached with an 
oil gas apparatus. 

Taking lesson from the water-gas 
men who were compelled to change 
to oil gas, the prospective investor 
should secure an apparatus that, should 
the occasion require, could change from 
oil-gas to water-gas. and the necessary 
connections should be bought with the 
apparatus and stored for possible use. 

To give an idea of the comparative 
economy at the present time of water 
and oil gas manufacture, using prevail- 
ing prices for fuel and oil, the follow- 
ing is submitted, an arbitrary standard 
of works being one of 10,000 cubic 
feet, daily send out, which I think will 
be a fair average through the State, ex- 
cluding the large cities, of course. 
COST OF MATERIAL— WATER 
GAS. 

Forty-five pounds of anthracite coal 
per thousand feet manufactured at 
$10.00 per ton, 22j4 cents. 

Fifteen pounds of boiler fuel, 7;^ 
cents. 

Four and one-half gallons of Coalin- 
ga oil per thousand feet, made for en- 
riching at 3 cents per gallon, 23J4 
cents. 

Total material per one thousand 
feet of gas manufactured, S3 l A cents. 
OIL-GAS. 

Twelve gallons of crude oil at 2 cents 



per gallon, 24 cents. 

This amount includes boiler fuel 
and oil for heating up the apparatus for 
the first thousand'. 

It can readily be seen that in order 
for water-gas to become dominant 
again, the price of crude oil must at 
least double in price, the difference in 
favor of oil gas being 29 cents per 
thousand feet of gas made. 

As the other expenses of the two sys- 
tems are alike, no notice is taken of 
them, and the question of coal gas is 
hardly liable to ever again be consid- 
ered seriously by the smaller com- 
panies in the State. , 

Oil gas being a demonstrated success 
there is apt to be a rush towards that 
class of investments and gas properties 
will again be classed as the best pos- 
sible investment for surplus moneys. 

With modern methods and able 
management, a great many towns in 
this State that have hitherto not enjoy- 
ed the blessings of gas will secure it, 
and the gas man may well look for- 
ward to a wonderful activity and con- 
tinued prosperity. 

B. S. PEDERSEN. 

137 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



The Sunshine Paraffine Oil com- 
pany has been organized at Tuc- 
son, Arizona, to develop 4,000 
acres of land in the Pinal country. 
L V. Navarro, Mexican consul at 
Tucson, is president of the com- 
pany, and W. W. Robinson, a min- 
ing engineer from San Francisco, 
is general manager. The com- 
pany is capitalized at $1, 000,000. 



The test well drilled in on the 
Pryor farm by the Carter Oil com- 
pany at the head of Straight Fork, 
two miles in advance of the Big 
Lime development on Clear Fork, 
Monroe county, O., is good for 
forty barrels a day. 



LATEST OIL NEWS. 

New Development Work in Dif- 
ferent Fields. 

FRI- 

Oil has been struck in the Coal- 
ings district of California by the 
El Zumo Puro Oil company. The 
Esperanza company has a 400- 
barrel well in the same section. 

GLENN. 

The Washington-California well 
is now 1,850 feet deep. The drill 
has now gone through 250 feet of 
very hard formation and is now 
going down rapidly and with 
comparative ease. The drill is 
now in a soft sandstone and were 
it not for the water present in the 
well better work could be done. 
The company is very much elated 
over the prospects and think that 
in a short time they will demon- 
strate to the world that Glenn 
county has oil and plenty of it. 

KERN 

The Claremont is sinking a well 
at present. 



PACIFIC Oil. REPORTER 



47 



The Associated is now running 
four strings of tools. 

Three strings are being operated 
by the Monte Cristo. 

The Nevada is in oil in No. ro, 
and No. 9 is pumping. 

The Sovereign is putting up a 
new rig, and will soon be drilling 
No. 6. No. 5 in the oil. 

A general merchandise store 
and a meat market have been es- 
tablished at Oil Center. 

The Dayton company has be- 
gun operations in the northwest 
corner of section 9, 23 23, near the 
Inter-Nos. The contr ict calls for 
a well 1,500 deep. 

The St. Paul Oil company at 

Sunset has completed the well on 

which it has been working for 

1 some time past, and will shortly 

begin work on another well. 

Several deals for property in 
the Sunset and Midway fields are 
now pending, and according to the 
terms of option must be closed up 



within the next thirty or 
days. 

The Pittsburg is putting up 
fourteen derricks on its property 
at Sunset, and in all more than 
100 derricks are being erected in 
that field, most ol them on assess- 
ment work. 

It is reported that recently the 
tjueen well at Sunset, which has 
been closed for some time, was re- 
opened, and the oil fairly poured 
out at the top of the tubing and 
through the casing at the rate of 
2,000 barrels a day. 

The Kern Oil company is per- 
forating its well on the northwest 
quarter of section 28, 28-28, and 
has all arrangements completed 
for continuing the work of drill- 
ing. The company has entered 
Into a contract for the sale of its 
product. 

The California Fortune Oil com- 
pany's well, No. 2, which gave 
such a spectacular performance 
about a year ago, repeated it last 



week, when the cap was blown off 
by the pressure of gas and oil, and 
spouted a stream of oil over the 
top of the 74-foot derrick. Before 
it could be recapped, several hun- 
dred barrels of oil ran to waste 
down the road, much to the dis- 
gust of those who were compelled 
to travel over it. The remarkable 
record of the California Fortune's 
three wells is accountable for the 
extensive development in North- 
West Sunset. It is estimated that 
at least 75,000 barrels of oil are in 
storage at this company's plant. 
A contract has been let for a 55,- 
000 barrel steel-riveted storage 
tank. This will be the largest 
tank in Sunset, and as large as 
any in the State. The California 
Fortune is supplying oil to drill- 
ing rigs in the immediate vicinity. 
O. S. Hickey, who went out to 
Sunset a few days ago to perforate 
the United Crude's well, found 
the hole choked with sand, and, 
after cleaning it out, was prevent- 
ed from further operations by the 






1 




V 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



gushing of the oil. In Mr. Hick- 
ey's opinion, the well flowed 150 
barrels in twenty-four hours, and, 
when it is perforated, that it will 
go three times that much. Noth- 
ing more will be done with the 
well until after the holidays. 

The Webfoot company, pioneer 
of the Cuyama,is now down about 
700 feet with its 1 1 5 s casing. Ow- 
ing to cold weather, which pre- 
vents the flow of water through 
the pipes until two o'clock in the 
afternoon, the work is apt to be 
abandoned until next spring. 

The Sunset Center is reported 
to have decided to drill ' seven 
wells during the coming year. 
This is the company which recent- 
ly turned down an offer of twen- 
ty-seven cents at the railroad ter- 
minus, equivalent to twenty-five 
cents at the well. 

The California Combined Oil 
company has let a contract for a 
well on section 7, 28-2S on land 
adjoining the Edgar. The con- 
tractors are Z. L. Phelps & Co. of 
Los Angeles, and they propose to 
use the wire cable, claiming it is 
possible to drill much more rapidly 
with such than with the rope 
cable. The contract calls for a 
depth of 1,500 feet if necessary. ■ 

The Standard has been offering 
inducements of late to the com- 
panies lying along the eastern 
side of section 25. 28-27, which if 
accepted will end in the laying of 
a pipe-line up the canvon which 
runs through that region. The 
price to be paid for the improve- 
ment is the signing of contracts at 
a comparatively low figure, and, 
so far, consent has not been ob- 
tained. 

There was not any very great 



cessation of work in the oil fields 
during the holiday season. There 
is a steady increase of new work 
and many of the owners in the 
petroleum districts have yet to 
complete their assessment work. 
Preparations for much new de- 
velopment work have- been made 
and operations will commence 
shortly after the first of the new 
year. 

The estimated output of the 
Kern River field is 25,000 barrels 
a day. About 20,000 barrels are 
shipped out and the balance is 
used by local consumers and stored 
by the Standard. Some 330 wells 
are being pumped, a greater num- 
ber than for a year past. The 
wells, naturally, have dropped 
down from their first capacity and 
the time is not far distant, it is be- 
lieved, when drilling will again be 
undertaken generally. 

According to an advertisment 
printed in an eastern oil publica- 
tion, the Dabney company of Mc- 
Kittrick has land valued at $1,000,- 
000, seventeen wells, cash on hand 
and bills receivable amounting to 
$47,042.77 and a surplus and un- 
divided profits to the extent of 
$120,111.46... Its liabilities are less 
than $5,000. It has paid ten con- 
secutive monthly dividends of one 
percent of the par value of the 
stock. 

The Lion Oil company has con- 
tracted to furnish the Pacific Re- 
fining company of Alameda with 
all the oil needed for its entire 
operations. The Lion has only 
one well of unknown productive- 
ness, "but it has eighty acres of 
land in the heart of the Sunset 
district, and oil of high gravity. 
The contract price is 23 cents and 



the contract period six months. 
Other Sunset producers expect an 
advance in the price of 30 cents in 
a few weeks. 

The California Kern Oil com- 
pany has twenty-five acres in 8, 
29-28 in Kern River and also 640 
of undeveloped territory back of 
Sunset. The company has one 
good producing well, and will 
shortly have several others, as it 
is prepared to immediately com- 
mence drilling operations. The 
officers of the company are well- 
known citizens of Indiana, the 
vice-president being the lieuten- 
ant-governor of that State, and 
the secretary being ex-secretary 
of the State, the treasurer being 
city attorney of Indianapolis, and 
the president being F J. Carman, 
one of the best known oil and 
mining men of California. The 
stock is held largely in Indiana, 
and large blocks of it are also held 
in Germany. The company ex- 
pects to be soon producing large 
quantities of oil. 

It is a flattering commentary 
upon the worth of our fields that 
capital in Texas, in the neighbor- 
hood of Beaumont, should be seek- 
ing investment here. Yet such is 
the fact, says the Californian. 
An operator who has handled 
some of the largest propositions 
in Kern county oil land deals 
is now in communication with 
Texans who are desirous of 
getting in on good things in Kern 
River, Midwav, Sunset, or Mc- 
Kittrick. In Texas is what was 
recently supposed to be the great- 
est oil territory in the world, and 
yet men who are now there, who 
know all about the value of that 
district, choose to put their money 



into California property. Several 
deals are now on which, if they 
go forward to completion, will end 
in the acquirements of lands and 
leases in this locality by operators 
who. in so. buying, acknowledge 
that the fields of the West are of 
more worth than those of the 
South. 

1,0s ANGELES. 

The Murphy Oil company at 
Whittier started its second string 
of tools last week. 

George Robinson has the con- 
tract for drilling a well for the 
Central Oil company at Whittier. 

The Home Oil company started 
another string of tools last week, 
making three strings now running 
by this company at Whittier. 
The new well is No. 16 and is 
just south of No. 15. 

The Whittier Crude Oil com- 
pany whose tools have been idle 
for the past six weeks started 
again this week. Frampton Bros., 
contractors, state that it is the 
purpose of the company to make 
this a test well, going as deep as 
possible. The location is on top 
of the hill north of the other wells 
of this country. 

By a lease that now is effective, 
the terms of which are well 
guarded, the Los Angeles field of 
the Consolidated Crude Oil com- 
pany has been leased to Allen 
Craig, The office of the company 
has been removed from the Frost 
building to specially erected prem- 
ises on the corner of College and 
Adobe streets, where J. W. Mc- 
Michael, the secretary, can be 
found. The tenor of the lease 
does not in any way effect the 
identity of the company. Major 
Bulwer, the president of the com- 



HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD. 



Most Valuable Oil on Pacific Coast. 

There is a refinery at Halfmoon Bay that buys the oil and pays {1.50 per 
barrel for the oil at the well. This refinery makes THB HIGHEST GRA.DB GASO- 
LINE, BENZINE AND ICEROSBNE OB ANY KBBINERY ON THB PACIFIC COAST. 



$89 buys 100 Shares in each of four companies, op 
400 shares full-paid, non-assessable stock, par value $400 

1. The advance to par of one stock out of -four will return in cash 
112 percent on the investment. 

2. The advance to par of two stocks out of four will return in cash 
225 percent on the investment. 

3. The advance to par of three stocks out of four will return in cash 
337 percent on the investment. 

4. The advance to par of all four stocks will return in cash 450 
percent on the investment. 

Stockholders of all four companies protected by a Trust Fund of 
goo, 000 shares held in trust by us. 



The following is taken from a letter written by C. T. Dean, Secre- 
tary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, to the London, 
England, Petroleum Review: 

'There have been some discoveries lately on the coast at Halfmoon 
Bay, San Mateo County, adjacent to San Francisco, of a very high grade 
oil, 52°Baume. Although we have an unlimited supply of low grade fuel oil, 
we have comparatively little as yet of a high grade for illuminant purposes: 
It is gradurlly dawning on capital that they are letting the greatest opportu- 
nity that has ever come to this State slip into corupantively few hands, 
and I can see them in a few years kicking themselves because they did not 
take advantage of it. Money is plenty and there is no reason except lack 
of knowledge (which is easily obtainable) why they do not invest, not in 
any speculative venture, but in actually proven lauds, which can be 
obtained to day for from $500 to $5,000 per acre, and which in a few 
years will be worth five times that price." 



Trust Fund— The Investor Protected by a 
Stock Pool. 

A Trust Fund has been perfected which is of the highest import- 
ance. The stock of each one of the companies is guaranteed by the 
other three* Investors are protected by trust-fund stocks contributed 
to a pool by each company pro rata. This pool aggregates' 900,000 shares. 
We act as trustee foi this pooled stock. If either one of the companies 
should be unsuccessful, the stock therein will be taken up and the pooled 
stock ot the suocessful companies will be substituted therefor on a basis 
which will protect the investor from loss. Thus if three com- 
panies out of the four were unsuccessful and only one became a dividend- 
payer the investment would still yield i2'/i percent profit, with such 
dividends as were thereafter received in addition. It is not expected that 
any of the four companies will be unsuccessful, but, from the investor's 
standpoint the Trust Fund is, nevertheless, a most desirable feature. 



THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY now offers stock for sale in four 
strong companies operating in the HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELDS. One ci m- 
pany is pumping 52° gravity oil, selling it at $1.75 per barrel at the well; another 
company drilling, 1,150 feet, with 200 feet of oil in the hole, enormous gas pres- 
sure, every indication of a first-class well; tnird company's well down 700 feet, 
passed through several prolific oil strata ; fourth company has very valuable asset. 
and land holdings, drilling rig, and interest in royalties from developing companiess 

All these facts are explained in detail in our printed matter, the following 
being a partial Index of the subjects treated : 

INDEX. 



Facts Worth Reading , Costly Advertising 

Investigations Why Some Corporations Fail 

Trust Fund Our Plan 

Debentures A Word About Our Business 

Experienced Management A Good Thing to Do 

a Word of Caution Satisfied Stockholders 

Our Invariable Rule The Percent of Failures 

No Man Always Knows A Refinery 

Loans to Customers Maps and Photographs 

Our Profits Ten Reasons Why 

The Big Four The Price of Oil 

Directors of The Oil Companies Press Notes 

Reports Upon The Property Faithin Oil 

Our location is 35 miles from San Francisco with tidewater transportation. 



THREE REQUISITES FOR A SUCCESSFUL OIL PROPOSITION : 

TRANSPORTATION, MARKET, PRICE. 

Halfmoon Bay has all these, with a high grade oil, 50 to 55 gravity. 
Investigate this proposition. 

Write us for maps, pictures, literature, etc. • 

THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

230 Bush St., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTRR 



_49 



pany, who is in Europe, will not 
return for several months. 

MARIN. 

The active work b;Ing carried 
on near the town of Bolinas, in 
Marin county, by the Bolinas Bay 
Oil company, piomises the devel- 
opment of a new oil district near 
San Francisco, as Bolinas Bay is 
only about twelve miles lrom this 
city by water. The company 
holds over 1.200 acres of land, on 
which croppings of oil sand and 
seepages appear in many places. 
Two wells have been drilled — No. 
1, to a depth of 2,000 feet, in 
which oil was found at 740 feet, 
1,320 feet, and at 1,660 feet, to the 
extent of from five to fourteen 
barrels per day, being of light 
gravity, from 24 to 34 . Well 
No. 2, now being drilled, is down 
a little over 1,600 feet. Tracings 
of oil have appeared, and the for- 
mation indicates that a body of 
oil may soon be reached. At a re- 
cent meeting of the board of di- 
rectors it was decided to drill a 
third well. The officers of the 
company are: E. A. Bruguiere, 
president; Wm. McCracken, vice- 
president; LeRoy G. Harvey, sec- 
retary and manager. Office, 520 
Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA. 

The Rocky Mountain Oil com- 
pany has raised $10,000 to con- 
tinue its drilling operations near 
Elko. Oil indications are abun- 
dant. 

ORANGE. 

Well 34 on the Santa Fe lease is 
now down 2,600 feet, and it Is said 
to be the deepest hole in the Ful- 
lerton field. The company is look- 
ing for light oil in this well. 

At a reported price of $50,000 
Charles Victor Hall of Los An- 
geles has purchased from J. W. 
Hale 100 acres of unimproved 
land in La Habra valley, three 
miles from La Habra, Orange 
county. Owing to the favorable 
indications for oil in that section 
Mr. Hall, who is a pioneer in the 
oil industry, will proceed to de- 
velop. In the Orange county 
fields activity prevails, with thirty- 
two rigs now in operation. The 
best oil thare is reported as sell- 
ing at $1.70 a barrel. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

Well No. 11 on the Western 
Union came in last week Wednes- 
day with a good strong flow of oil 
at a depth of 1,820 feet. 

The Southern Pacific company 
has acquired title to a valuable 
piece of oil property heretofore a 
part of the Arellanes rancho, near 
Casmalla, in the northern section 
of Santa Barbara county, on the 
main line of the coast road. It is 
the intention of the company to 
drill for oil to be used for fuel pur- 
poses in the company's locomo- 
tives. It is understood that the 
Southern Pacific will begin opera- 
tions at once. 

The Pinal Oil company are run- 
ning their pump regularly now 
during the daytime and producing 
72 barrels per day. Of course by 
pumping day and night they could 
double this amount. A mam- 
moth tank has been erected. Sur- 
veyors are at work marking out a 
line for a pipe-line, which, when 
completed, will enable the Pinal 
people to pump direct to the rail- 
road. The ground is being gotten 
in readiness for well No. 2 and the 
derrick put in place. Operations 
will begin shortly. 

The Brookshire company is dis- 
posing of its stock so rapidly that 



operations will be under way be- 
fore very long. The company 
owns its property, and being only 
three-quarters of a mile from the 
l'inal company, and in direct line 
with the famous Western Union 
property, there is every reason to 
believe that they will strike oil 
when they get started. 

The Grasciosa Oil company, 
working on the Captain Harris 
rancho, is making slow progress. 
The well is now 2,180 feet deep 
with a 6 inch casing. The ground 
in which the drills are moving Is 
of a sticky and caving nature. 
The drillers are therefore forced 
to proceed very slowly in order to 
protect the well from caving. 
There are heavy seepages from 
several strata already cut. 

SAN BENITO. 

The Hamiltonian Oil company 
has commenced operations in the 
Vallecitos district. The property 
has been turned over to the 
Ashurst company of Stockton, 
which will continue the develop- 
ment of the company's holdings. 

VENTURA. 

The Slocum company has just 
finished up a well that is good for 
twenty-five barrels per day. 

The. Sulphur Mountain Petro- 
leum company are up against a 
fishing job, having lost two strings 
of tools in the hole. 

The Ferndale Oil company's 
outfit was sold at sheriff's sale on 
the 1 2th inst. to tbe Union Well 
Supply company for $587.30. 

It is reported that the Merchants 
and Traders Oil company has 
struck a good well on the Burson 
lease near Bardsdale. 

W. F. Robinson, who was ap- 
pointed receeiver for the Buck- 
horn Oil & Transportation com- 
pany has begun to deepen one of 
the wells on the Buckhorn lease, 
with the expectation of inreacsing 
the production. 



Thirteen hundred tank cars are 
owned by the Southern Pacific 
and Santa Fe railroads, the Stand- 
ard Oil company, and a few more 
outside companies, carrying oil in 
California. 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



Bid.' 
• 30 
■75 
.08 
■ 12 



Asked. 
•31 
.85 
.11 



.68 



■95 



• IS 

•57 

9800 . 

3.00 

16.00 . 

.06 

.08 
3-8o . 
8.25 

.06 

.18 
1.27^. 

■13 

• 17 

12. 2S 
•3° 
I.50 
7.00 . 

.26 
1.62^. 

8.00 

1.50 
56 00 . 
96.00 . 

2.50 

• 45 . 



3.05 



Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks. 

Apollo 

Aztec 

Bear Flag 

California Standard 

Caribou 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude 

Clairmont , 

Four 

Hanford 

Home 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern River 

Lion 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of West Va. 

Oil City Petroleum 

Peerless 

Reed Crude 

S. F.&McKittrick 

San Joaquin O. & D 

Sovereign 

Sterling 

Thirty-three 

Twenty-eight 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Wolverine 



.08 
.09 



9.00 
.07 
•19 



.14 

.18 

12.50 

•31 

1-75 



.28 



8.50 
1.60 



500 



Through the recent purchase by 
the Erkenbrecher sydicate of Los 
Angeles, a new field in this coun- 
ty, twelve miles west of Santa 
Monica, north of the Malibu 
ranch, will be explored for oil. 
About 4,000 acres have been se- 
cured by lease and purchase from 
F. H. Rindge. The ocean is dis- 
tant about one mile from the land. 
It is understood that indications 
for light oil are noted that will 
make the field desirable. F. M. 
Elliott and W. H. Tonkin of 
the syndicate made the in- 
vestigation and prepared the 
reports. Mr. Elliott says that ar- 



rangements will be perfected as 
soon as possible to put rigs in the 
j field. The property leased in 
I elude the holdings of D. M. How 
' '•■ I.. Waring. .1. A. St an wood 
- Stanwouil. S S. Stanwood 
T. H. Dudley, B. H. Henry, C. C 
Deming, W. A. Deming, J. W 
Henry, P. B Marsh, M. C. Lich 
tenberger, H. E. Carter and J. G 
Hoy. 



Mcnil-crrs of Merchant*" Hxchange 

California Slock ami Oil Exchange. 

Sylvaln Solomon 
BftOEBR. Grain, Oil, Stocks & Bovds 

Room 2-.t Ray ward HuiUliug, 
Telephone Main 5775 Sun Fmticiseo. 



Alaska Mosquito Head Net 

A Perfect Protection Against Insect Pests 




Adopted by the United States 
Government as the Standard for 
use in the army. 

Over rso.oooof these nets sent to 
the Philippines. 

Invented for and in general use 
in mosquito-infested Alaska. 

Folds up compactly and goes 
easily into the pocket. 

Made of specially prepared gal- 
vanized steel wire and the finest 
and strongest netting. 

Invaluable for hunters, campers 
and travelers. 

Can be worn day or night with- 
out inconvenience. 



Made in Two Varieties. 

No. 1. Made of finest netting, sure protection against mosquitos. 50 cents. 
No. 2. Made of very fine, but strong, imported lace, for midges and black 
flies, f 1.00. 

If your dealer does not handle them, write direct 
to the manufacturer and we will mail on receipt of 
price. 

ALASKA MOSQUITO BEAD NET CO. 

Factory, 1927 Haste St., BERKELEY, CAL. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORfilE 



Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack,?[the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San ; 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wreflch 



For carrying and placing 
bits in drilling stem boxes 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. For sale by all dealers. 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 



J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



.So 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GiIt=Bdged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKlttrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City. 
Street Improvement Company, 



ACRES 



ACRES 



of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected. Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, - 



Stock Nonassessable. 
= $350,000 



475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our A 1 Refined Asphaltum 



RESIDENCE 



TELEPHONES 



OUR RATES ARE CHEAPER 

Than Any City of Proportionate Size in the United States 



On and After January I, 1903 



Individual Line, no nickel attachment, unlimited city switching, 
Two Party Line, no nickel attachment, unlimited city switching, 



$5.00 per Month 
$4.00 per Month 



Pacific States Telephone & 

Telegraph Company 

216 Bush St. San Francisco 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



5i 



OU-6red engines are being ran for ex- 
perimental purposes on the London, 
Brighton and Sooth Coast railway. Tbev 
are burning liquid fuel (presumably Tex- 
as), which gives off no smell during com- 
bustion. The oil is stored in a galvanised 
iron tank, provided with a gas pipe, aud 
placed in the tender. When the engines 
are in the stations care is taken by those 
in charge to prevent persons from seeing 
the liquid fuel burning arrangements. 
It is obvious that the company is con- 
ducting the experiments on most perfect 
lines. 



Stock, Boid and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining; Stocks 
R. L. CHHNRY, Secretary 
S14-S>S Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. BWEN 

Member California Stock and 
Oil Exchange, 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL-. 



Telephone Main 1552. 



J. B. HILL 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange 

Mills Building. Sixth Floor, Room 9. 

Telephone, John 946 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange and of San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 



Joseph L. King. 

Room 3, Second Floor, Mills 

Bdilding, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of San Francisco Merchants' Exchange 
and Producers' Oil Exchange. 



Joseph B. Toplitz 

STOCK BROKER 

Oil and Mining Stocks Bought and Sold 

Telephone Bush 385, 330 PINE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Reference: California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company. S. F. 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



50 Percent 



a year. How to make it, 
Write J. D. (Johnston, 
Newport, R, I. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



PEERLESS OIL COMPANY— ON DECEM- 
ber 1, 1902. declared a dividend No. io, of ten 
(10) cents per share, payable February i, 1903. 
Books close January 26, 1903. 
The address of stockholder W. I. Taze is desired. 
GURDON BRADLEY, Assistant Secretary. 



GOLD! 



Always at Par. 



Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owns rich gold properties in Arizona; 
active work now in progress, to continue 
which stock is being sold at 



10 



A' Full Paid, 

CflADF Absolutely 

<" ,rtnl - Non-Assessable. 



When present block has been subscribed 
price will be advanced to 20 cents per 
share. Send for particulars. Bank ref- 
erence. 
W. G. Young tf Co., Fiscal Agents, 
628-630 Laughlin Building, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



California Fortu pany, 

Three Flowing Wells, 

1>1>TRICT, 
Dstaag , su Francisco, Cal 

QYGNBT FRTROLKCH CO 

•^P"* 1 1 .50.000 

50.000 th.tr. at |j. 

Location— Fresno count j. 

Dtrcctora-Chaa. L Fan. prcssdcnl. B1IU w r-aa 
Ion. Tice-preaMenl. Chaa. A. Lee. treasurer. John 
C. McRlror. secretary 

Office- 561 Parrot! Building-. 

Tel.— South 1&1. 



Opportunities in a Lifetime A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. E. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 

Capital.. »soo.ooo 

Treasury stock Ixoooo 

Location: 91 acrea leaaed proven oil land In 
McKlllrtck: So acre, owned In Coallnga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno. 160 acre, owned ad. 
Joining oil well In Napa valley. 

Leased 6000 acrea asphaltum land in Santa 
Clara county. Asphaltum refinery erected. 

Officers: R A Falkenberg. president: M J Hen- 
ley, secretary; B B Clawaon, R P chase. Col F, I 
Ensign. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrotl Building, 853 Market 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the Largest stock. Onr prices are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters 5 

Sold Within a Few Years. 

97 percent of 16 Leading San Francisco 
Banks Use Smith premier Typewriters. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is used 
exclusively by the Telegraph Depart- 
ment and the Sunset Freight Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Western Union and other Telegraphers 
use 115 Smith Premiers. 

Heald's Business College uses 32 Smith 
Premiers. 

San Francisco Call uses 23 Smith Premiers 

Oakland Public Sohools use 11 Smith Pre- 
miers, 

Pacific Hardware and Steei Company uses 
21 Smith Premiers. 

The Viavi Company uses 10 Smith Pre- 
miers. 

California Wine Association uses 9 Smith 
Premiers. 

The Emporium Company uses 7 Smith 
Premiers. 

Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett use 4 Smith 
Premiers. 

Descriptive Art Catalogue-Book on Touch 
Typewriting-No Charge 



Headquarters School, Gorerineit and 
Oil Laads in California. 



School land* may !•<■ taken I 
Land* aboun.l in ft. I countic 
quire no condition* aa to i 
cult iv* t ton. and carnr all m 



M. S. ALEXANDER 



L. E. ALEXANDER 



L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 

110 Mont* -Tiery St. San Francisco. 

Branch Stores: 

Spokane. Los Angeles and Portland. 



in mo acrea. 
late. They te- 
ice 00 ■• 

1 .nrl deposit*, 
°«ly$t ijanacie. Kaay term*. Fortunes have 
been made In atl the California oil district*. Now 

*<hool land* are adapted to 
Farming. Raoching. Timber Lands and are the 
-afe»t and Cheap**! speculation 10 the United 
Ma lev Send stamp for l.an.t Book and Circular*, 
fine proven oil land* to offer. Correspond. iu p 
aottcited. BaUbltahed 18S5. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



If You are going East call at the 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 
INFORMATION 
BUREAU 



and secure a copy of the booklet entitled 
"Electric Lighted, op Dollar (or 
Dollar," descriptive of the new electric- 
lighted Overland Limited service. 
Adjustable electric reading lamps in 
every berth, telephone service at each 
terminal until hour of departure. 

The New Electric-Lighted Overland 
Limited marks an era of advance in 
Railroad Equipment. 

E. O. MCCORMICK, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Pass. Traffic Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agent 



Southern Pacific Company 



PATENT S — United states and 

Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



219 Crocker Building 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 

kindred hydrocarbons 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 



San Francisco, Cal 



W. B. YOULE 



* 




CONTRACTOR & 
OIL EXPERT 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

I- Opinion on Oil Territory and 
j Proper Location given before 
Drilling. Advice on Value of 
I Stock, Oil Lands and Pros- 
j pects. Prices Reasonable. . . 
' Best of References. Stand- 
ard Rigs Furnished, Fishing 
Tools on hand. Contract Drill- 
ing for Oil. Twenty-five Years 
Experience in California Fields 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Present Address; 

Arbuckle, 
Colusa Co., - Cala. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 

ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but it Is especially 

1 ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simr 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Terri 
and In many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds et 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. AKRON, OHIO. 




52 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



UNION OIL TOOL COriPANY 




UNION UNOERrREAMER 



INCORPORATFD 



Manufa 



^"^^LUp=to=Date Drilling 

WWVWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWvWWWWWWW W W WVVW WW V 



AND 



Fishing Tools 

WWW WVWW^^B*^^^W V WW WW^WW^ W WW W WW W^^^W^F W WW W WW WW WWW 



FORGING AND MACHINE WORK 



WW^WWWWWW^ W WW W WVWW^WW/W^W WWW WW w W WW WW^W WWWW WWWWVWWW WWW^W WW 

FISHING TOOLS, BITS AND JARS A SPECIALTY 

▼▼▼▼ V W WW •¥¥¥¥¥▼¥¥¥¥▼ WWWWWWWW^WWW^WWW^WWWVW WW^W^WW^WV VWWWW^W 

547 MATEO STREET, 

Phone South 26 Los Angeles, Gal. 



American Steel & Wire Co, 

CH1CA60 NEW YORH WORCESTER DENVER SAN FRANCISCO 
Manufacturers of 

American Steel Wire Drilling Line 
American Steel Wire Pumping Line 
American Steel Wire Tubing Line 
American Steel Wire Sand Line 



Brittan Automatic Drilling Swivel 
^PACIFICj WORKS- 

GENERAL COAST OFFICE 

Folsom & Sixteenth Sts 

CITY SALES OFFICE 

8 and 10 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEO. H. ISMON 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NO. lO 



AGENCIES 
Los Angeles, California 

B. W. SMITH, Sales Agent 
Portland, Oregon Seattle, Washington 

E. R. EtDREDGE, Sales Agent O. D. COI.VIN, Sales Agent 



CHAS. C. MOORE & CO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



hninneers complete power plants 

****^1UW.1 ** Machinery of the Highest Grade 




Geipel Steam Traps 

Always Closed when Steam 

is in the Brass Pipe. Always 

Open when Water is in the 

Brass Pipe. 

Guaranteed Positive in its 

Action. 




Main Olfice 

San Francisco, Cal. 

32 First Street 



Branch Offices 
NEW YORK 1803 Havemejer Bldg 
LOS ANGELES 103 S. Broadway 
SEATTLE 2i8 Second Ave. So 







Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 4. No. 10. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1903. 



Price 10 Cents. 



OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 

P1TTSB URGH, PA. 

MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING REQUIRED 

To Drill, Equip and Operate OIL, GAS and WATER WELLS 
BOILERS, ENGINES, DRILLING and FISHING TOOLS 
MANILA & WIRE ROPE, CASING, TUBING, DRIVE & LINE PIPE 

COMBINATION OUTFITS 

INTERCHANGEABLE FROM STANDARD CABLE DRILLING TO THE 
HYDRAULIC ROTARY SYSTEM, SHIFT MADE IN A FEW MOMENTS 
FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER. 

CABLE SYSTEM FOR HARD ROCK FORMATIONS, HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
FOR QUICKSAND 6- CLAY, COMBINATION OUTFITS for any condition. 



\ 




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IMPERIAL WORKS, Oil City, Pa., one of the OIL WELL SUPPLY CO.'S numerous ManTg Plants. 



THE COLUMBIA STEEL DRILLER. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






50 cents Asphaltum Refinery 50 cents 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure GHt=Edged Stock 

Modern Refining Works with Four Fine Steel Stills of 500 
Tons per Month Capacity are Completed and Running. 

Refining Works near Sargent, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coallnga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have leased on very low royalty, from the City 
Street Improvement Company, 

6000 ACRES 0000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of high 
grade asphalt near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
Refined Asphalt at a figure which will enable us to 
pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract in carload lots crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected, Refining Works and 
a Fine Laboratory NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned within a 
short time. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $14.60 per 
ton (present price) is greatly superior to the famous 
Trinidad at $40 per ton f. o. b. here. 



Standard Rock Oil Co. 



Capitalization 500,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 
Treasury Stock, = 



Stock Nonassessable. 
- $350,000 



475=476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coallnga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 



Alaska Mosquito Head Net 

A Perfect Protection Against Insect Pests 




Adopted by the United States 
Government as the Standard for 
use in the army. 

Over 150,000 of these nets sent to 
the Philippines. 

Invented for and in general use 
in mosquito-infested Alaska. 

Folds up compactly and goes 
easily into the pocket. 

Made of specially prepared gal- 
vanized steel wire and the finest 
and strongest netting. 

Invaluable for hunters, campers 
and travelers. 

Can be worn day or night with- 
out inconvenience. 



made in Two Varieties. 

No. 1. Made of finest netting, sure protection against mosquitos. 50 cents. 
No. 2. Made of very fine, but strong, imported lace, for midges and black 
flies, fi.oo. 

If your dealer does not handle them, write direct 
to the manufacturer and we will mail on receipt of 
price, 

ALASKA MOSQUITO BEAD NET CO. 

Factory, 1927 Haste St., BERKELEY, CAL. 



MAPS OF THE OIL FIELDS 



Showing all of the Companies, Wells, Tanks, 
Etc., in the Kern River, Sunset, Midway, McKit- 
■ trick and Coalinga Fields. 

These Maps are brought up to date and are ab- 
solutely corrert. They are the only maps that 
show the condition of these fields as they exist 
to-day. 

These maps are Copyrighted by the publishers, 
Barlow & Hill, and can only be used by them and 
their authorized agent in San Francisco, The 
Pacific Oii, Reporter. 

PRICE LIST OF MAPS. 

Large Blue Prints, 25x25, single map . $1.50 

Large Blue Prints, 25x25, per doz. . . 15.00 

Small Maps, single map 25 

Small Maps, per doz. 1.50 

Small Maps, per lOO 10.00 

Small Maps, per 1,000 30.00 

Small Maps, each additional 100 . . . 15.00 

Maps in colors, printed to order, showing in red 
the holdings of any particular company. Folders 
and Prospectuses printed giving maps and show- 
ing location of company's property, with proper 
descriptive matter. 

The above can be obtained only from 

Barlow & Hill 

1501 19th St., Bakersfield 

or the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco, Cal. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 4- No. 10. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.. SATURDAY, JANUARY 10. 1903. 



Prick, Ten Cunts. 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALT. 



Its Use in the Eastern States is Increasing 
Very Rapidly. 

The California Product Fast Taking the Place of that 
From Trinidad, and Over 1,000 Miles of East- 
ern Streets Were Paved with it Last Year. 



Asphalt is an important product of 
the California oil fields. The estimated 

yield for the year 190^ is 26,100 tons, as 
against 21,634 >"" s f ,,r 1901: the value for 
1903 at the average price of $13 per ton 

was $338,000; for 1901, at the prevailing 
price of $14.47, was $313,319. 

Below is a table showing the amount 
and value of California's asphat produc- 
tion from 1887 to 1903, both inclusive, as 
compiled from a bulletin issued by State 
MineTalogist Lewis R. Aubray. 



securing all the asphaltum they want by 
treating oil at the refineries. Moreover 
there are more refineries, and more as- 
phalt is being made at them than ever 
before. 

The percentage of asphalt in Califor- 
nia oil varies greatly. The largest per- 
centage is found in the shallow wells in 
the southern part of Sunset. Samples 
obtained by Hugh Philipps for the 
Easton-Eldredge interests contained 
about 80 percent liquid fuel asphaltum 



of other products than aiphaltum un 

profitable. 

In no other part of the United States 
arc there such large and trainable 
ducts of asphaltum as in California. The 
quality, after years of practical use and 
testing under all conditions, has been 
pronounced to be equal to, or better 
than, any other grade used in the mark- 
et. In southern California, especially in 
I.os Angeles, where bituminous rack was 
laid for many years, that material has 
not been admitted in the pavements for 
the past five years. In that city there 
are now several milesof asphaltum pave- 
ments, where the bituminous rock pave- 
ment has been taken up and replaced 
with asphaltum. Although laid for five 
years, and subjected to the wear of heavy 
traffic, these five milesof pavement have 
not cost one cent for repairs. 

Refiued asphaltum from California 
has been gaining a standing and reputa- 
tion in the East, where it has to compete 
with Trinidad asphaltnm as to quality 
and price. It has been shipped by rail 
at a carload rate of about $12 a ton to 
either Chicago, New York, Boston, or 
any city east of the Mississippi. Now 
the various reSning interests of the State 



\sphaltuni is far superior to bitumin- 
ous rock for paving purposes. The lat- 
ter has been laid pretty generall) in the 
larger cities of California. This ma- 
terial conies chiefly from deposits in 
Santa Cm/ and San l.uis Opispo coun- 
ties. In the early history of bituminous 
rock, when material used for street pave- 
ments was extracted from the outer 
ledges of the deposit, contractors were 
able to get a very good and even grade. 
It was fine In texture and could he re- 
lied upon for producing a fairly good 
pavement— much better than the ma- 
terial proved to be after the deposits 
were penetrated, where the ledges and 
deposits were in an uncertain condition 
ind it was Impossible for contractors 
to tell what class of material they 
were getting. The greatest trouble is 
the uncertainly. A contractor cau not 
tell when he lays it down what the re- 
sulting pavement will be. The as- 
phaltum which is in the sand is very 
uneven in quality and the sands are un- 
evenly distributed. If it were possible 
to get a thousand tons, say, of bitu- 
minous rock of the same or uniform 
composition, it would be possible to make 
a pavement of uniform tenacity. It is 
impossible. 




Refinery of Jewett & Blodgett at Sunset. 



Year. 



1887. 
1888. 
18S9. 
1890. 
1891. 
1693. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
igoo. 
1901 . 



Totals 



I903 . 



Tons. 



4000 
3,100 
3,000 
3,000 
4,000 
7.550 
9, 150 
11,698 

25.525 
20,914 
22,697 
25,690 
15,060 
■2,575 
21.364 



'«9.59o 
26,000 



Value. 



$ 16,000 

39.500 

50,000 

30,000 

40,000 

75.50O 

161,250 

233,800 

170,500 

362,590 

404,350 

482,175 

308, 130 

253,950 

313.219 



Per 

ton. 



$4.00 
12.74 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
17.62 
19.98 
6.67 
17.24 
13.40 
18.77 
20.45 
20.19 

H-47 



$2,920, 964J $15.41 
$35S,ooo! $13.00 



Of the 1901 product of 21,364 tons, 
9,324 tons, were from asphalt mines and 
12,043 tons from the refining of oil; or 
45.5 percent from the mines and 54.5 
percent from the oil wells. For the year 
1902, for which accurate figures are not 
yet at hand, the proportion from the re- 
fineries will show a large increase. In 
fact one of the biggest asphalt mines has 
been closed entirely, and the owners are 



or 60 percent of a D grade product. The 
south Sunset fields have a distinct lead 
1 over the other districts in this respect. 
The heavy percentage is due to the near- 
ness of the oil to the surface, the vola- 
tile elements having been evaporated. 
There is the disadvantage that the wells 
•re small producers and the oil is hard 
to handle. In the northern part of the 
Sunset field the wells are much deeper. 
the oils lighter and the percentage of as- 
phaltum smaller. 

In the Kern county fields the petro- 
leum is heavy, carrying forty-five to fifty 
percent of asphaltum. The light oils of 
Coalinga carry as low as twenty- five per 
cent. 

January i, 1902, there were eleven re- 
fineries in the State; January 1, 1903, 
there were thirty-two refineries, nearly 
every one of which is operated to save 
from oil the important by-product of as- 
phaltum. Two large refineries, one at 
Sunset, the other in Kern county, have 
i been operated for asphalt only, since 
I there was no market available for the 
distillates and the kerosene. The lack 
of cheap transportation made shipments 



have come to an agreement to maintain 
prices, they have combined and will ap- 
point one selling agent in New York, and 
make shipments by sea in shipload lots, 
reducing the charges for freight about 
one-half, and adding greatly to their 
profits. 

There is no class of pavement that has 
increased so rapidly in the favorable es- 
timation of the people. The area of sur- 
face covered last year in the United 
States with an asphaltum pavement w 11 
exceed any other class of pavement by 
300 percent. There has been laid or un- 
der contract last year one thousand miles 
of roadway to be paved with asphaltum, 
aggregating a cost of |<oo,ooo,ooo. 

California asphaltum has been largely 
used in this great work. New York City 
has up to the present time laid 3,000,000 
square feet of pavements with California 
asphalt; Brooklyn, 1,800,000 square feet; 
Buffalo, 700,000 square feet; Pittsburg, 
700,000 square feet. Other cities are us- 
ing this material, and it is no longer an 
experiment, but has proven to be one of 
the most successful street-paving ma- 
terials that has ever been offered. 



Refined asphaltum is always almost 
absolutely pure — at least 97 or 98 per 
cent. If properly treated in refining — 
and California refineries have learned 
how to treat it properly — there is no ma- 
terial that will or can surpass if for mak- 
ing a smooth, bard surface that will 
wear well and stand the extremes of 
heat and cold. 

The market for the California product 
is widening and the demand for it is in- 
creasing. In New York Trinidad as- 
phalt is quoted at I35 a ton and the Cali- 
fornia product at I32 — the difference of 
J3 a ton not being due to the inferior 
quality of the California material but to 
the reputation Trinidad has bad for 
j ears. 

In fact, California asphaltum is su- 
perior to that from the island of Trinidad. 
Trinidad ships about 62 per cent asphalt, 
while much of the supply from Cali- 
fornia runs over 90 per cent. The Cali- 
fornia product is brought to a proper 
consistency by adding natural asphalt, 
while the Trinidad has added to it 
■'still bottoms," or residues of refining 
the paraffine base of Eastern oils. Our 
prepared asphalt is better and more 
lasting. In the Trinidad product the 
proportion of pet rolene exceeds that of 
asphalteue, while in the California it is 
just the reverse, giving the latter a 
tenacity, durability and elasticity not 
possessed by the former. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A VALUABLE MINE. 



A Gold Property that Will Soon be Paying 
Big Dividends. 



It Is Located in Tuolumne County, California, Directly 

on the Great Deposit of Gold Ore Known as 

the "Mother Lode." 



Throughout the southern portion of 
Tuolumne county there is great activity 
in gold mining, partly due to the 
splendid showing made in the various 
prosperous and operating mines, and 
partly due to the fact that the mines are 
at last in direct connection by railroad 
with the outside world, so reducing 



Augels, following closely the direct line 
of the lode, and bringing into close com- 
munication some of the principal mining 
properties of California. 

Among the properties benefited by the 
completion of this new railroad are the 
Rawhide, Melones and Norweigan mines, 
all located directly upon or very close to 




today making most rapid strides in de- 
velopment. 

Tne property of the Norwiegan Con- 
solidated Mining company comprises 
about forty acres of patented ground, 
with all surface buildings and equipment 
necessary for operation, to a depth of 
2,000 feet, though the present main shaft 
has only reached a level of 525 feet. 

The mine has been operating for the 
past five years, and in development has 
encountered uniformly fine bodies of 
high grade milling ore with frequent 
shoots of ore running to high values that 
have attracted the attention of all the big 
operators along the lode, and have given 
the mine its reputation among the rich 
and profitable producers of gold. 

The Norwegian mine is in operation 
and is well warranted by the bodies of 
ore already uncovered and ready to be 
knocked down, and in the extensive im- 
provements and additions being made to 
give increased capacity for milling and 
other treatment of ore after it has been 
brought to the surface. The present, 
stamp mill has proved inadequate for 
the work of stamping out the free gold 
values, and the mine is in shape to 
handle and keep busy a mill with ca- 
pacity of twenty-five stamps, with the 
expectation of further increase during 
the next year of development work un- 
derground. 

In the mine to-day there are many 
hundreds of tons of ore ready to be 
knocked down, loaded into the cars and 
hoisted to the mill, and this ore is being 
taken out as the present milling capacity 
can handle it, but in the meantime work 
in the main shaft is being continued to 
carry it immediately to a point about 
250 feet below the present lowest levels, 
where a junction will be met of the 
three best producing quartz veins shown 
in the upper levels, with the assurance 
that at this junction will be found a 



Plant of a Gold Mine on the Mother Lode where Oil is used for fuel. 



of supplying the mines, and also in en- 
couraging the shipment to smelters of 
concentrates and of any high grade or re- 
fractory ores . 

It is only within the past sixty days 
that the Mother Lode Mountain railway 
has been in operation from Jamestown to 
greatly the cost operating in the expense 



the recently completed line. 

The Norwiegan mine is located about 
150 miles easterly from the City of San 
Francisco in the county of Tuolumne, 
California, directly on the most famous 
mineral belt of the West, the gold pro- 
ducing Mother Lode of California, and in 
the particular section of the state that is 




An Oil-Burning Plant of a Gold Mine on the Mother Lode. 



concentration of values as well as a con- 
solidation in volume of the three quartz 
bodies. 

This has been the experience of the 
successful mines in the vicinity of the 
Norwegian along the main Mother Lode. 

The Norwegian mine is complete for 
operation to a depth of 2,000 feet, and 
the milling capacity will be increased as 
the heavy bodies of ore are uncovered. 
Compressed air and machine drills are 
used in all the work underground, re- 
ducing the cost of mining to the mini- 
mum. 

The Norwegian mine is well known as 
having surface improvements and facili- 
ties equal to any. Power is supplied en- 
tirely by water which is carried through 
ditches to the central reservoir, located 
about 500 feet directly above the collar 
of the main shaft, and the supply is 
ample for operation without any help 
from steam or electricity throughout the 
entire year. The recently completed 
branch of the Sierra Railway to Angels 
passes within 250 feet of the property 
and all passenger and freight trains stop 
regularly at a point very close to the 
Norwegian company's office, affording 
exceptional facilities for handling sup- 
plies and timber for the mine as well as 
for the ore and concentrates shipped out 
to the smelters. 

In the Bell Mine, about one-half mile 
from the Norwegian, a "strike'' has re- 
cently been made of a fine body of high- 
grade milling ore, and, in consequence 
thereof, extensive surface improvements 
are being made. To the west of the Nor- 
wegian the Crystalline Mining company 
has a force of men at work driving their 
new tunnel, and generally along the 
Mother Lode there is great activity in 
all work of development. At the Me- 
lones Mine the new mill operating 
sixty stamps is busy night and day, 
grinding out the gold values, and the 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter Cables-best in tbe world 

We carry in stock heavy 7f6-in., 5f6-in. and 
4j^-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTRR 



present grent capacity is still further to 
be increased. Already there is on the 
ground equipment "f stamp t itteries to 
increase the capacity by an additional 
fifty stumps, and the concrete work is in 
position for these. This fanvus mine 
has one of the best and largest pi IX 
ore treatment upon the Pacific coast. 

The Norwegian Mine has been owned 
and operated by San Francisco 
from the commencement of work upon 
the ground, and his proved its value by 
a regular output of the precious metal. 

That gold mining in Tuolumne COOntj 
is generally prospering at this time is 
made plain from the reports issued by 
the supervisors of the county, giving in 
detail a resume of the year's mining de- 
velopment and from reports of the Cali- 
fornia State Mining Bureau. 

In the latter exhaustive reports, with 
reference to the gold production since 
1850 in California, the following state- 
ment is made: " What has been done is 
bnt an introductory chapter "f its his- 
tory." Certainly the annually increasing 
gold output seems to fully warrant that 
statement. 



Combine Against Standard 

The Bavarian Chambers of Com- 
merce have laid a joint petition 
before the ministry, asking that 
Bavaria combine with the other 
German kingdoms and principal- 
ities against the Standard Oil com- 
pany, which seeks to monopolize 
the kerosene trade. 

The petitioners demand that 
the royal railway be forbidden to 
establish oil tanks for the benefit of 
any trust supplying the consumer 
direct, near their tracks. All oth- 
er German chambers of commerce 
are invited to co-operate with the 
Bavarians. 

The Standard Oil company late- 
ly invaded the city of Rogens- 
berg, bought up the wholesalers' 
contracts with Roumanian oil 
wells, and then established a 
house to house delivery system, 
underselling everybody else 1% 
cents per quart. 



In Texas. 

Right Hon. James Roche, for- 
merly a member of the British 
parliament, representing County 
Kerry, Ireland, in the house of 
commons for eighteen years, is at 
at the head of a syndicate of Eng- 
lish capitalists who, it is stated, 
have secured an option on the oil 
field at Sour Lake, they having 
spent more than $50,000 in its de- 
velopment In the two months the 
field has been under their control. 
Mr. Roche was interested in the 
fields of Baku, Russia. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Rkpoetee. 



COAL AND OIL CONSUMPTION. 



In the Former Fuel Consumption Decreases 
But Increases In the Latter in 1902. 



The Total Figures Show a Marvellous Increase in 
the Total Amount of Fuel Consumed in Cali- 
fornia tor Manufacturing Purposes. 



The report of J. W. Harrison on 
the consumption of fuel coal and 
oil in 1902 has just been pub- 
lished. It contains the following: 

The consumption of coal this 
year shows a shrinkage of 389,187 
tons below that of 1901, as can be 
seen by referring to the figures 
below. This is no indication of 
the amount of fuel called for, as 
there has been a daily average of 
18,000 barrels of oil drawn from 
Kern county alone during the 
year, which is actually less than 
one-half the total amount of oil 
sent to market from the entire 
State. With this immense out- 
put for the year, it is singular 
that so much coal has been called 
into requisition. Never in the 
history of California have we con- 
sumed for steam and domestic 
purposes over 1,900,000 tons, 
whereas this year our fuel re- 
quirements foot up over twice 
this amount. There cannot be 
a more infallible index of pros- 
perity than fuel, hence 1902 must 
be chronicled as the banner year 
for California. 

Factories of all characters are 
running full time, and the major 
portion of them are now in arrears 
with their orders. This signifies 
an immense consumption of crude 
materials of every denomination, 
a number of which has heretofore 
come to us in the manufactured 
shape, simply because our high- 
lost fuel precluded home manu- 
facture. Thousands of skilled and 
ordinary laborers now find con- 
tinuous employment who would 
be seeking positions if unaided 
by low-priced fuel. Everything 
that moves, or is made, emanates 
from fuel; the cheaper same is, 
the greater the latitude is con- 
trolled for an outlet for the pro- 
ducts of our metals and our woods, 
which are manifold. To meet the 
oil competition, the prices of coal 



have been marked down, so that 
profits are finessed very closely. 
For household uses coal values 
have been well sustained, and 
will remain so, until some safe 
method may be devised where oil 
can declare itself a substitute. 
Hundreds of patents have been 
issued, each specifying that the 
main obstacle had been over- 
come, viz., the elimination of 
smell and smoke, without any in- 
crease of danger. They appear 
well, theoretically on paper, but 
are practically delusive up to date. 

For the moment coal producers 
feel confident of maintaining their 
position, hence a difference of 
$1.50 to $2.00 per ton exists be- 
tween first-class steam and do- 
mestic grades. It is singular that 
the imports of Australian and 
English show no decrease this 
year, notwithstanding they are 
handicapped with 67 cents per 
ton duty, and have fuel oil to 
compete with. 

The various sources from which 
we have derived our coal supplies 
are as follows: 

1S99 1900 1901 1902 

Tons Tons Tons Tons 
Brit.Coluuibla 623,133 766917 710330 591,732 

Australia 139,333 178,563 175.959 197,328 

English and 

Welsh.. 93.263 54,099 52,270 95,621 

Scotch none none none 3,600 

East'n (Cum- 
berland and 

Anthracite) 3S.95I 17.319 27,370 24,133 
Seattle (Wn.) 271,694 250590 240.574 165,237 
Tacoma(Wn) 355,756 418,052 433,817 209,35s 
Mnt. Diablo, 

Coos Bay ' 

andTesla.. 189,507 160,915 143,318 111,209 
Japan, and 

Rocky Mts. 

by rail 28,390 42673 51,147 47,380 

Total 1,740,027 1, 889,12s 1,834,785 1.445,598 

To secure a complete statement 
of the entire coal consumption of 
California, I have been obliged to 
include deliveries at Port Los 
Angeles and San Diego by water, 
which have been added in the 
above sources of supply. The 
total amount received by water at 
those ports foot up 126,356 tons. 

Fuel Oil. — The total produc- 
tion of oil for California for 1902, 



from figures carefully computed 
by the PACIFIC On. RbporTBR, 
shows the annual output to be 
over 13,000,000 barrels, equal to 
over three million tons of coal. 
1'p to date the oil discoverers have 
not proved to be the benefitted 
parties, the consumers have pur- 
chased their requirements at fig- 
ures leaving a very small margin, 
if any, to the producers, and have 
made large contracts for future 
deliveries at absurdly low figures. 
There is now a marked change of 
values, and purchasers will find 
they must pay more for their oil. 
fuel. It is now drifting into the 
hands of those who will prove 
more capable managers, and who 
have the necessary capital to en- 
able them to await making sales 
only when they are profitable. 

The recent purchase of the con- 
trol of the Beaumont wells by the 
Standard Oil company, and the 
immediate doubling ot oil values, 
shows what may be the probable 
future of the same interests here, 
when the pipe-lines are running. 
So far the discoverers and pro- 
ducers have not received the 
profits to which they were justly 
entitled. 

Coke. — The total quantity re- 
ceived by water foots up 64,916 
tons, as against 34,533 tons last 
year. Nearly 50 percent of this 
has been shipped from Great 
Britain, 18,000 tons from Belgium 
and Germany, and the balance 
from British Columbia and Aus- 
tralia. Considerable has been re- 
ceived by rail, but as this has been 
delivered direct to interior con- 
sumers it is impossible to approxi- 
mate these figures. 

Pig Iron. — The total imports 
by water aggregate 28,768 tons, of 
this 26,852 tons are foreign, 75 
percent of which were shipped 
from England, and the balance 
from Scotland and Belgium. The 
total amount of pig iron received 
here last year only figured up 
8,478 tons, hence it is very grati- 
fying to see the marked increase 
this year, evidencing that our 
factories must have had a greatly 
improved business. 

The above figures show an ex- 
ceptionally profitable year in the 
manufacturing line, and a marked 
assurance that there will be no 
diminution the coming year. So 
far we have had a seasonable rain- 
fall, promising us a favorable 
grain and fruit harvest; these, 
combined with our large oil re- 
fineries, now in course of con- 
struction, should show us bounti- 
ful returns for the ensuing year. 



O I L 

WELL 

SUPPLIES 
EXCLUSIVELY 



All Fully Equipped We Have 



^ THE LARGEST STOCK " 



ON THE 



PACIFIC COAST 



R. H. HERRON CO. S5? fSsco, s cal. 




STORES 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed By the California Petroleum 

Miners* Association' 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $250 

Six Months 1 50 

Three Months 1 00 

s 1 ngle Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Regi stered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

No attention will be paid to letters in- 
quiring concerning the standing of oil 
companies unless accompanied by money 
or express order for two dollars for 
each company concerning which informa- 
tion is desired. The editor of the PA- 
CIFIC OIL REPORTER Is compelled to 
adopt this rule on account of the increas- 
ing number of inquiries, which have taken 
up much valuable time. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal. . 
as second-class matter. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 10,1903 



The use of crude petroleum for 
fuel is not in 
Liquid Fuel Not any sense an 
an Experiment experiment. 
For twenty 
years and more it has been in 
general use in foreign countries, 
especially in Russia, where the 
use of oil for fuel began as far 
back as 1870, and so successful 
and profitable has its use been 
found that to-day there Is not a 
steamer on the Caspian sea, nor 
on the Volga; not a locomotive 
running on the entire Southern 
Russia railway system, nor hardly 
a boiler of that section of Russia, 
which is not operated by the use 
of liquid fuel. In fact, the use of 
such fuel is so rapidly extending 
throughout Russia and has been 
found to so materially benefit the 
industries of the country that ac- 
cording to late reports the con- 
sumption of oil for fuel now 
amounts to something like 9,000,- 
000 tons per annum. 

Nor is Russia the only country 
where the advantages of the new 
fuel have been recognized. The 
Hamburg - American Steamship 
company has fitted four steamers 
for liquid fuel, and the North Ger- 
man Lloyd two. Dutch mail and 
cargo steamers in the Far East 
are now employing liquid fuel 
regularly. The Shell Transport 
and Trading company have no 
less than twenty large steamers 
using oil fuel, and some of them 
are of 10,000 tons net carrying 
capacity. The Kensington, of the 
Red Star Line, has been the first 
passenger ship to cross the At- 
lantic with oil fuel. 

While crude oil has been so 
generally used for fuel that its 
use has passed the experimental 
stage particularly in Russia, such 
is not the case on the Pacific coast. 
Here experiments, many of them 



costly, are the rule rather than 
the exception. 

There are now over one hun- 
dred steamers hailing from San 
Francisco burning oil. On these 
steamers there are almost as many 
methods of using oil as there are 
steamers. These steamers are 
continually trying experiments in 
the way of new burners, new ato- 
mizers, new heaters, etc. One 
steamer is reported to have tried 
six different burners, and it is not 
yet determined which is the best. 

So far as we know not a single 
man or company claims to have 
adopted the system which is now 
generally adopted by the Russian 
steamers on the Caspian and the 
Volga, and the railway companies 
do not know wherein their sys- 
tems differ from those in use on 
the Southern Russian railway 
system. It would seem that no 
attempt apparently has been made 
to profit from the twenty years' 
experience of Russian engineers, 
who probably by this time have 
brought their appliances to some 
degree of perfection. There is no 
doubt but that our inventors in 
many instances have tried experi- 
ments and obtained results at the 
expense of much time, labor and 
money, that could all have been 
avoided had they been better ac- 
quainted with the results obtained 
perhaps years ago in far away 
Russia. 



DIVIDENDS IN SIGHT. 



The Immunity from accident that 

has at- 

Foreign Flash tended 

Tests for Fuel Oil the use 

of oil on 
foreign steamships is probably due 
to wise restrictions prohibiting the 
burning of oil of low flashing 
point. In fact, it is claimed that 
where the oil is of a proper flash- 
ing point there have been virtual- 
ly no serious accidents, notwith- 
standing its widespread and long- 
continued use. 

In Russia the law prohibits the 
use and the exportation of liquid 
fuel of low flashing point, and no 
oil which flashes below 150 is 
permitted. In the United King- 
dom Lloyd's Register originally 
required a flashing point of 200 
Fahrenheit, which has since been 
reduced to 150°, while the German 
authorities have accepted as safe a 
minimum flashing point of 150° 
Fahrenheit. The governments of 
India and of Ceylon permit the im- 
portation of oil for liquid fuel pur- 
poses which has a flashing point 
of over 150 Fahrenheit, and fuel 
of 150 flashing point has been in 
constant use from four to five 
years in a large number of the 
Shell company's steamers, as well 
as in jnany Dutch steamers in the 
East Indies, with complete immu- 
nity from accident. 



The Pacific Oii, Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



The Columbian Co.'s Refinery 
Now is in Full Operation. 

Many times during the past 
year this paper had occasion to 
mention the progress of a very 
worthy enterprise, the Columbian 
Oil, Asphalt & Refining company, 
operating at Carpinteria, Santa 
Barbara county, California. This 
company was incorporated about 
a year ago, and has been carrying 
on in the meantime very extensive 
operations, opening up its prop- 
erty, and has been acquiring ad- 
joining properties from time to 
time in view of controlling practi- 
cally all the asphalt business in 
that district. Its most important 
acquisition was the famous Al- 
catraz Refining plant and its 
thirty-nine acre property, from 
which about $1,000,000 worth of 
asphaltum has been taken out and 
refined. This deal was consum- 
mated a few months ago, and 
since then the Columbian com- 
pany has been remodeling and 
equipping the plant throughout 
with modern appliances and cow 
has it in successful operation 
starting with a daily capacity of 
from 400 to 500 barrels, which ca- 
pacity will be Increased from time 
to time according to requirements 
up to at least 1,000 barrels daily. 

The company now controls 
practically all the asphalt land in 
that district, and on account of 
the superior quality of the as- 
phaltum, and the many by-prod- 
ucts of great value which the re- 
finery is now separating from it 
and putting into marketable form, 
the management claim that enor- 
mous earnings will be made, and 
the first quarterly dividend is ex- 
pected to be declared now almost 
any time. 

The company is very conserva- 
tively capitalized for an enter- 
prise of such magnitude, the capi- 
tal stock being only $1,000,000, 
divided into shares of a par va ue 
of 10 cents each, fully paid and 
non-assessable. Three-quarters of 
the stock was placed in the treas- 
ury to be disposed of for the bene- 
fit of the company as needed 
from time to time. 

The president of the company, 
Mr. Clarence W. Ayers, a promi- 
nent oil expert and oil operator, 
is giving his personal attention to 
the affairs of the company, as is 
also Mr. John R. Scupham, the 
treasurer and manager of the com- 
pany, who is a prominent mining 
engineer of San Francisco. As- 
sociated with them are other well- 
known San Francisco business 
and professional men, making a 
very strong and thoroughly re- 
sponsible enterprise. The finan- 
cial affairs of the company were 
placed in the hands of the Ameri- 
can Investment company, 2 Kil- 
by street, Boston, Mass., who are 
acting as fiscal agents and have 
met with marked success in plac- 
ing the company's treasury stock, 



and the many hundred stock- 
ho'.ders interested in the company 
are about to be rewarded with the 
first dividend, and we understand 
it will be the policy of the com- 
pany to pay quarterly dividends 
thereafter. 

On another page will be found 
an announcement of this enter- 
prise by its fiscal agents, and in 
the advertisement is a very fine 
half tone of a part of the com- 
pany's extensive refining plant, 
to which we call your special at- 
tention. The American Invest- 
ment company who are handling 
the stock is a prominent broker- 
age house in Boston of many 
years' standing, and well-known 
and thoroughly reliable. 



A Profitable Concern. 

The career of the Union Oil 
company of California illustrates 
how profitable a properly man- 
aged and permanent oil enterprise 
may become. The company was 
organized in November of 1890, 
and has paid dividends regularly 
every year since. Ninety-three 
dividends, amounting, in the ag- 
gregate to $1,131,250, have been 
paid. In addition to these divi- 
dends, the company has invested, 
out of its surplus net earnings, 
approximately $1,000,000 in plant 
and property. According to the 
statement made by the stock- 
holders last June, the company 
has written off for the deprecia- 
tion of property in the wear and 
tear of machinery, etc., the sum of 
$1,045,465.42. This latter item 
has, of course, been added to 
somewhat since the date men- 
tioned. Last year the capitaliza- 
tion was increased from $5,000,000 
to $10,000,000, represented by 
100,000 shares. 

The Union Oil company in ad- 
dition to being the largest pro- 
ducer of oil is the heaviest oil re- 
fining concern in the State, and 
the bulk of its profits undoubtedly 
come from the refining branch of 
its business. 



A Correction. 

The president of the Peerless 
Oil company states that the Pa- 
cific Oii, Reporter was in er- 
ror in stating in its issue of Jan- 
uary 3 (last column, page 31), that 
Peerless dividends will be in- 
creased to twenty-five cents per 
share "by the first of April, if not 
before." He states that under 
the most favorable conditions such 
a result cannot be expected before 
July 1. 

The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds underwritten. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



PACIFIC OIL RHPORTKR 






A GREAT PAPER. 

The New Year's Edition ol the Pncitie 
Reporter Well Received. 



Oil 



From All Sides Come Heartj Congratulations and 

Strongest Words <>i' Praise lor the Enterprise 

and Ability Displayed. 



It is plea-ant to work if the work is appreciated. 

This applies to every branch of labor, and the work of the news- 
paper publisher is no exception. 

To publish an edition such as was published last week by the 
PACIFIC On. tt means not only the outlay of a great deal of 

capital, but it means weeks of labor, a tireless quest for information 
and statislics from the various oil fields, and the collecting and 
arranging of the facts in such form as to make them both intelligible 
and interesting. 

Thst the New Year's edition was well received by the public 
goes without saying. Everyone who read it was pleased, and most 
readers were also astonished at the amount of development work 
shown to have been accomplished in the different fields, and at the 
bright outlook ahead for the oil industry in 1903. 

Although an edition of 20,000 copies was printed, enough it was 
thought to easily supply the expected demand, the sales have been 
so much larger than was anticipated that the edition is very nearly 
exhausted. The Sau Francisco News company, which supplies 
dealers all over the State, has twice duplicated its original order, and 
will probably need many more. The paper has sold freely in every 
oil field in the State, and next week Eastern orders will entirely 
exhaust the edition. 

Below are given a few of the many complimentary notices and 
letters received in regard to the edition. 



Of Marked Value to the Oil Industry. 

San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 3, 1903. 

Mr. W. B. Winn, Editor Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine St., 
City. 

Dear Sir: We have looked over with much interest the New 
Year's edition of the Pacific Oil Reporter, and wish to congratu- 
late you upon the excellent paper, and one which we believe will 
prove of marked value to the oil industry of California and the coast 
in general. 

You are deserving of a great deal of credit for the work in be- 
half of the oil industry, which has proved such a boon to the Pacific 
coast in general, and, in our judgment, we are only just beginning to 
realize the benefits that it will prove to all interests. 

Assuring you of our hearty approval and support, so far as we 



can give it in the advancement of the work pertaining to the oil in- 
dustry, and wishing yon all the compliments of the season, we re- 
main, Yours very truly. 

Pacific Coast Sales Agent, American Steel and Wire Co. 

v«.ry Able Number. 

Cai... Jan. 6, 1903. 
Mr. W. B. Winn, care of Pacific On. K 1,318 Pine St., 

San I'rancisco, Cal. 

Dear Sir : Accept my congratulations upon the very able num- 
ber which you have given to the public. I am very much pleased 
with it, and believe that it will be of matetial benefit to all oil pro- 
ducers in the State. 

Wishing you a happy and prosperous New Near, 
Yours very truly, 
Rdw. Strasbtjrg, President Oil Storage and Transportation Co. 



Most Valuable 01 Any Oil Paper. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cm.., Jan. 3, 1903. 
Mr. W. B. Winn, Editor Pacific On. Rhportkr, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

My Dear Sir: The California Petroleum Miners' Association 
wish to congratulate you on the issue of your journal of the New 
Year. It Is in our opinion the most valu ible issue of any oil paper 
within our knowledge in reference to the California industry. The 
articles are reliable and well written, and contain a mass of matter 
never before put forward in a single issue of any oil paper. We ap- 
preciate the difficulties you must have encountered in obtaining your 
facts, and above all in having them free from inaccuracies. 
Yours very truly, 

C. T. Deane, Secretary. 

Best Trade Paper Ever Issued. 

FROM THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter's special New Year's edition, issued 
yesterday, is the most creditable trade publication ever presented to 
the people of the coast, if not of the entire country. It is of fifty-two 
pages, printed on a fine quality of paper, thus presenting the numer- 
ous half-tone cuts of interesting scenes in the oil fields of California 
as clear as finished photographs. 

The many oil fields are graphically described and interesting 
figures of the output of each, with the remarkable development of 
the industry, are given. In a true and carefully compiled table it is 
shown that the output from the 2,152 producing wells of twelve dis- 
tricts for the past year was 13,692,514 barrels, a daily average pro- 
duction of 37,513 barrels. 

Owing to a lack of market and transportation facilities, 424 wells 
are capped. At the present time 138 wells are being drilled. The 
depths of the producing wells range from 200 feet at Summerland to 
2,500 feet at Fullerton. No person interested in petroleum or its by- 
products should remain long without a copy of this number of the 
Reporter. 



RECEIVE NEW ENGINE. 

University Will be Equipped fop 
Testing Petroleum Fuels. 

A highly important addition to 
the equipment of the University 
of California mechanical building 
is now being installed preparatory 
to opening new fields of investi- 
gation for the senior class in ex- 
perimental engineering. The de- 
partment has received a ten horse- 
power, two-cylinder Westing- 
house gas engine to take the place 
of the old and long since discarded 
Otto engine, whose antiquated 
pattern and long use had rendered 
useless. The new machine will 
be used for testing purposes, and 
especially for taking up the in- 
vestigation of the comparative 
efficiency of crude oil with gas 
or gasoline. A crude oil genera- 
tor is now being made by the 
students under the direction of 
George E. Cox, the expert pat- 
tern-maker of the department. 
This will be used to generate gas 
from crude oil for the purposes of 



supplying the motive power of 
the machine. The engine will be 
so piped that all three combusti- 
bles can be tried under the same 
conditions. Tests will be made for 
their efficiency under different 
conditions, such as varying loads 
and points of ignition, and vari- 
aus temperature of jacket water. 
These promise to be the first 
thorough experiments regarding 
the comparative efficiency of crude 
oil in gas engines, as nothing but 
desultory testing has ever been 
attempted heretofore. Charles C. 
Major, instructor in mechanical 
engineering, will have charge of 
this particulaa branch of the work. 

The Louisiana Field. 

Fifty Milwaukee capitalists, 
whose names are not to be di- 
vulged until the organization is 
completed, are forming an oil com- 
pany for the' development of the 
newly-discovered oil fields in Cal- 
casieu parish, Louisiana. The 
new Eldorado adjoins the oil fields 
of the Standard Oil company I 



across the line in Texas, and in- 
cludes about 20,000 acres of the 
same belt. ■ everal flowing wells 
have already been sunk, and their 
product has been analyzed by 
City Chemist Fred Ruschhaupt 
and pronounced of about the same 
grade as the crude petroleum 
which the Standard is using. 

He Took Out the Kinks. 

George Simonds, the man who 
burst the bottoms out of oil wells 
with nitro-glycerine, shot a well 
near Battlesville, Indian territory, 
the other day that was a surprise 
to both himself and the natives. 

The hole was a little over 200 
feet deep and one of those pretty 
curves in it which some drillers 
know how to make without the 
aid of a transit or a book of logar- 
ithims. 

The place the hole turned off 
on a new tangent was in a stratum 
of marble, or what the Texans 
called granite marble. Mr. Si- 
monds undertook to "' get on to 
the curves" of that hole and to 



blow all the crookedness out of it. 
He let. down a charge of sixty 
quarts of nitro-glycerine, and 
when the squib was dropped the 
upheaval of earth, shale and 
marble which followed tore away 
part of the derrick and made a 
hole at the surface six feet across. 
An investigation proved that the 
hole was no longer crookid. It 
had become a crater. — Chanute 
(Kan.) Daily Sun. 

Oil In New Brunswick. 

In New Brunswick an oil basin 
has been found about 100 miles 
long, beginning within thirty miles 
of St John and extending north- 
ward. In this basin there are 
three strata of oil at varying 
depths, and the quality of the 
product has been declared to be 
almost equal to that of the high- 
grade fields of the United States. 

Up-to-date maps of Kern Kiver, 
McKittrick, Sunset-Midway and 
Coalinga fields for sale at this of- 
fice. Large blue prints, $1.50; 
small maps, 25 cents each. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made OH One of the 
Greatest Industries in the Far West. 



KERN 

The Combined Oil company, on 
7, 28-28, is down about 600 feet. 

The Areata is making fine pro- 
gress with its first well on the 
northwest quarter of section 31, 
32-24. 

The famous Shamrock well on 
the southeast quarter of 4,29-: 8 
has surpassed all former records 
for flowing. For six days the well 
has kept up an unceasing flow, 
producing at least 1,000 barrels 
daily. 

The total shipments of oil from 
McKittrick during the last four 
months have been as follows: 

September 389 

October 173 

November 427 

December 453 

Lack of cars was the cause of 
the small number shipped in Oc- 
tober, otherwise there has been a 
gradual increase. Twenty-nine 
cars was the largest number 
shipped in any one day, this hap- 
pening two weeks ago. 

The Kern River Oil company at 
McKittrick will increase the pro- 
duction of their wells to 1,500 bar- 



rels daily. There are eleven fin- 
ished wells on the lease, but only 
five have been producing any oil 
for some time. Work has been 
commenced to make them all pro- 
ducing, and there are prospects 
that the output will exceed ex- 
pectations. Well No. 1 has been 
flowing nearly a month. 

It was the discovery of oil that 
made Kern county famous. The 
Kern River district is the most 
productive of all the oil fields in 
the county. The other produc- 
ing oil districts are Sunset, Mid- 
way and McKittrick. Land in 
these districts rose from a value 
of $1.25 per acre to $4,000, $5,000 
and even $10,000 per acre. It 
produced more than 50 percent of 
all oil produced in the State last 
year. — S. F. Chronicle. 

It is reported that Jewett & 
Blodgett will soon build a pipe- 
line from Sunset north t. est as far 
as the California Fortune and 
Lucky Boy wells, and perhaps 
farther. This will take in a large 
number of the large producing 
companies such as the Sunset Dia- 
mond, New York, Lion, Tiger, 



Sunset Center, Kern Sunset, Mari- 
copa, Federal Crude, Superior, Oc- 
cidental, Monarch, Obispo, Acme, 
Beaver, Stratton, etc. Tankage 
for 175,000 barrels is to be pro- 
vided at Sunset. Contracts are 
now being closed up, and the line 
will be laid unless operators hold 
out for too high prices. It Is said 
to be up to them. 

Up-to-date maps of Kern Kiver, 
McKittrick, Sunset-Midway and 
Coalinga fields for sale at this of- 
fice. Large blue prints, $1.50; 
small maps. 25 cents each. 

l,OS ANGELES. 

The Murphy Oil company at 
Whittier continues to send out 
lots of oil, having shipped over 
150 car loads during December. 
Work on wells Nos. n and 12 
of this company continues, the 
drill going down with a good deal 
of rapidity. This same company 
have just finished their 1,700-bar- 
rel tank at Los Nietos. This is 
their third loading tank at this 
station. 

OREGON. 

There is said to be quite an 
amount of activity in the Malheur 
county oil fields. Baker City peo- 
ple have had a gang of men at 
work there for some time doing 
$100 worth of work on each claim 
held by them, and in the aggre- 
gate have expended $3,000. The 
late Sol. Hirsch, of Portland, and 
the Hope brothers, banters of 
Vale, some time ago provided 



$20,000 to put down the first well. 
Although their operations were 
conducted with the greatest se- 
crecy, it is understood in the 
neighborhood that they have 
struck the first oil sand, which is 
an indication that they are liable 
to find what they are looking for. 
Those who have examined the 
Malheur fields claim that there 
are plenty of oil seep and gas 
there. Some time during the past 
year United States government 
geologists examined the ground, 
and on their report the section 
was withheld as an oil reserve. 
Experts from Pennsylvania, Cali- 
fornia and other places have vis- 
ited and studied the district, and 
none yet have turned it down. 
SAN BENITO. 
At present in the Vallecitos 
there is considerable stir in oil 
matters, and indications point to a 
great deal of work being done 
within the next year. Four rigs 
are now drilling, and several more 
are getting ready to commence 
operations. This territory has been 
looked upon as one of the best 
prospective fields in the St?te, 
and, now that capital has become 
interested, the future of the Val- 
lecitos as an oil-producing section 
is assured. 

SAN BERNARDINO. 

The San Bernardino Develop- 
ment company is a Chicago cor- 
poration, which controls, under 



(Coast Oil News contined on page 10.) 



INVESTIGATION EM INVESTMENT 



By you in the 



Elk Horn Consolidated Oil Co. 

Owning 1,400 acres positively proven oil land in famous Kern County, Cal., situated in the McKittrick, 
Midway and Sunset Oil Districts. The location of present operations is in famous Section 2, Township n, 
Range 24, Sunset District. Well No. 2 is surrounded by the following well-known corporations: Jewett, 
Blodget and Beale; El Rey; Pittsburg; Emperor; Superior; Wichita; Barrett; Areola; Occidental; Gold 
Dollar; Monarch; California Fortune; and Medina. An investment now at the ground-floor price of 



30 cents A SHARE 



WILD LARGELY INCREASE 

IN VALUE IN A VERY 

SHORT TIME. 



30 cents A SHARE 



We earnestly urge that you act at once in buying this stock. The price to-day is 30 cents a share (par 
value Ji.oo) and will be advanced from time to time as development progresses. The stock we offer 
is full-paid and non-assessable Treasury Stock, and is sold for the purpose of rapidly advancing develop- 
ment. We have issued an accurate map prospectus and will be pleased to mail you a copy. A postal will 
bring it. Incorporated under Territory Laws of Arizona. Member alifornia Petroleum Miners' Associ- 
ation and the Pacific Coast Petroleum Miners' Association. 

When ordering stock, Make Drafts, Express and Postoffice Money Orders Payable to the Corporation 

and forward to the 

, ELK BORN CONSOLIDATED OIL COMPANY 



470-471=472 Parrott Building 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



WITH POLE TOOLS. 

They Do Better Work In Canadji 
Thiin the Cable S.vetem. 
The boundaries of the oil field 
in Raleigh township have not, of 
course, been defined yet, but the 
Petrolea men have formed their 
opinion. They think that the 
6e d is bounded on the south by 
the lake and on the north by the 
middle road. The eastern bound- 
ary is made by a line drawn from 
Peter Jennet's farm, on the mid- 
dle road, to Cedar Springs, and 
the western boundary by a line 
drawn from T. L. Pardo's, on the 
lake shore, to William Bump's 
farm, at the corner of the middle 
road and the four-rod road. Of 
course this is only conjecture, and 
until the ground has been filled 
as full of holes as a pepper-box 
the size and extent of the oil field 
will remain a mere conjecture. 

On the Petrolea expert's judg- 
ment the field may be said to cov- 
er about 12,000 acres It won't be 
long before a lot more is known 
about the field, as drilling opera- 
tions on a large scale are com- 
mencing. Five drills are working 
now. The Imperial Oil company 
is erecting two more and the Cal- 
ifornia and Ontario Oil company 
began erecting two drills to-day, 
One is being put up on the farm 
of J. Johns, 13th concession. Cor- 
ey's drill is being put up on the 
Walker farm. 

This is the first test well to be 
put down south of the gusher. 
Two drilling rigs were shipped 
from Petrolea alone for the Ra- 
leigh oil fields this week. 

William McCrae, of Petrolea, is 
one of the men who are taking a 
very active interest in the Raleigh 
oil fields. He has been in the oil 
business since he was sixteen 
years old, and knows a good many 
things about oil. It may be said 
that Mr. McCrae is the biggest 
man in the oil business in the 
world. When you h ve seen him 
you can believe it. He weighs 
about a quarter of a ton. Mr. Mc 
Crae has just returned from the 
oil fields of Sumatra. He says that 
the oil fields there are good, but 
the country is a little warm. 
Coolies do all the work. Speak- 
ing of the two classes of drills, the 
cable and the pole, Mr. McCrae 
said: 

"I have been in the drilling 
business for years and have used 
both kinds of drills. The pole drill 
is by far the best adapted to the 
soil of this part of the country. 
At Petrolea we drill 500 feet with 
a pole drill, shoot the well and put 
in the pump all in from four to 
seven days. Where there is a deep 
surface of clay, as here, the pole 
drill will work much more rapid- 
ly. With the pole drill we can go 
down the first 160 feet in three 
hours, while it took those Amer- 
icans from Monday noon to Tues 
day noon to sink a hole 140 feet 
with a cable dr,ill. There is no 



system that has ever been Invent- 
ed that will put down a well as 
cheaply as the Canadian system, 
where the conditions are the same 
as they are here. In the old days 
at Petrolea the cable drill was 
used altogether, but it was dis- 
carded and replaced by the pole 
drill. This latter rig is cheaper, 
faster, and more effective. Pole 
well drillers will dtill a well down 
to a depth of 500 feet for twenty- 
four cents a foot, and find every- 
thing, while cable men consider 
from forty to forty-five cents cheap 
drilling with their rig. " I can tell 
you," continued the old Canadian 
oil well expert, " the American 
drillers can't tell the Canadians 
anything about drilling." — Chath- 
am Planet. 



A PECULIAR WELL. 



It is Productive But One Month 
in the Year. 

There is an old well near Payne 
creek, six miles from Barbours- 
ville, Ky., which is a puzzle to 
the oil men of the country. 

The well, which is now in the 
middle of the creek, flows regu- 
larly every November, but never 
at any other time of the year. 
During this month it flows at in- 
tervals, discharging great streams 
of oil, gas and salt water, and sud- 
denly stops to flow no more until 
November comes around again. 

This strange well was drilled in 
1840, on the bank rear Payne 
creek, by old settlers, who were 
after salt water, from which to ob- 
tain their salt. The machinery 
used at that date was of the crud- 
est nature, yet the drillers suc- 
ceeded in getting down 450 feet, 
when, to their astonishment and 
dismay, they struck an immense 
stream of oil, which flowed for 
days and weeks. 

In the course of time the bed of 
the creek changed, until at this 
day, It flows over the top of the 
old well. Since then during 
every November the water over 
and around the hole boils up 
through the force of escaping gas. 

As far back as the people in 
the neighborhood can recollect 
the well has made these annual 
eruptions. This year the dis- 
turbances came somewhat earlier 
than usual, attracting more than 
ordinary attention, owing, doubt- 
less, to the fact that oil men are 
operating in that section of the 
country. At times during the 
last few days water and oil have 
been thrown up fully fifty feet. 



was again lowered, and they are 
now about ten feet into the sand, 
and the oil growing stronger all 
the lime. There is very little gas, 
and just enough to cause the well 
to flow when capped. 

The well was first started in Oc- 
tober, a year ago, and drilled to 
the first sand, where very little 
oil was found, although the pro- 
duction was estimated at about